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  • 07/20/14--01:01: Movie Thief
  • About

    Movie Thief (Japanese: 映画泥棒, Eiga Dorobo) is a nickname given to a Japanese promotional character for anti-piracy. Since after 2010, the camera-headed guy has been a popular subject for parodies or fan works which are filled with a suggestive atmosphere though he’s a wholesome mascot for public service announcement.

    Origin

    In 2007, Movie Thief was born for an awareness-raising campaign for anti secret filming in theaters. This campaign titled “NO MORE Movie Thief” (NO MORE映画泥棒)[1] has been run by “Let’s Go to the Movie Theater” Committee, an agency formed for awareness-raising activities by Japanese movie industry organizations, and it’s scheduled to end in 2015.

    As of 2014, “NO MORE Movie Thief” has been changed 2 times in 2010 and 2012 for covering the revised copyright laws. The common plot in this series is a camera-headed man tries filming with dancing strangely and gets warned in a quite serious tone. In addition, he gets arrested by a police man with a red patrol lamp on his head after the 2nd version. And because there is no mentioning to the proper name of that camera-headed man, Camera Man (カメラ男, Kamera Otoko), he became to be called as “Movie Thief” among viewers. In a similar vein, the antagonist is known as Police Man (警察官 or 警官) or Red Lamp Man (赤ランプ男), though his official name is Patrol Lamp Man (パトランプ男, Patorampu Otoko).



    Spread

    Regardless of good or bad, Movie Thief has high visibility among Japanese people because they have to watch his strange dance every time before movies begin in theaters. His reputation in the early days was actually not so good. However, partly due to its atmosphere changing into more comical and cheery throughout the revisions, he became to a familiar character in moviegoing with people getting accustomed to him.

    Meanwhile, the online fandom for Movie Thief began growing rapidly in 2010, which was mainly driven by Fujoshi or female otakus who get “Yaoi” inspirations from the relationships of him and Patrol Lamp Man who was added to the series in that year. Therefore, most of fan illustrations for Movie Thief in the Japanese illustrator communities pixiv[2] and Nico Nico Seiga[3] are drawn by female users with a flavor of homosexual love. And Movie Thief parody videos on the Japanese video sharing service Nico Nico Douga (NND) are mainly hand-drawn animations or Miku Miku Dance covers, both of which are particularly popular among female users.[4]

    Additionally, doujin comic books for Movie Thief has been published on Comiket or other Doujin events since 2012, and even a doujin event[5] dedicated to Movie Thief has been held annually since 2013.



    Cover Art of the 1st Doujin Anthology Comic

    Official Merchandise

    “Let’s Go to the Movie Theater” Committee initially received the popularity of Movie Thief negatively because the committee considered the character as an evil incarnation of piracy in public service announcements. In fact, a secretary general of the committee told a newspaper in 2010 that they declined all merchandising approaches for Movie Thief as well as offers to him from TV shows and other commercial media.[6]

    However, the committee changed its policy, Movie Thief began to appear on the media in 2013. In January 2013, a Japanese dance performer O-ki[7] revealed his role in the camera-headed guy and performed his famous dance in a famous lunchtime live TV program (shown below, left). Then December of that year, TOEI, a Japanese movie company which is participated to the committee, finally started to offer the official partnerships for Movie Thief merchandise.[8] Under this license, figures[9], T-shirts and small toys[10] for Movie Thief have been released since after February 2014 (shown below, right).



    <!-- img figure -->

    On July 1st, Movie Thief launched his official Twitter account for a promotional campaign for moviegoing in the summer vacation season.[11] This account had earned more than 40000 followers within the first few hours, and the number of followers had increased to near 90000 in the first week.[12]

    It’s no doubt that that large online fandom supports the establishment of the official “Movie Thief” business. However, the official has ignored it and never mentioned about it.

    Notable Examples

    Videos


    Niconico 映画泥棒でハガレンopパロ【手描き】Niconico 映画泥棒で攻殻opパロ【手描き】
    Left: Fullmetal Alchemist Opening Parody | Right: Ghost in the Shell Opening Parody
    Niconico 映画泥棒がコーラを振るだけじゃなくなった【手描き】Niconico 進撃の映画泥棒【手描き】
    Left: X Shakes Cola | Right: Attack on Titan Opening Parody

    Illustrations





    Search Interest

    External References

    Editor’s Note: Registration is needed to browse the original videos/illustrations listed in this section.

    [1]Wikipedia – NO MORE映画泥棒 (Japanese)

    [2]pixiv – Search results for the tag 映画泥棒

    [3]Nico Nico Seiga – Search results for the tag 映画泥棒 (Japanese)

    [4]niconico Douga – Search results for the tag 映画泥棒

    [5]Official Site for “Movie Thief” Doujin Comic Event (Japanese)

    [6]TOKYO Web – 東京新聞:劇場CM ビデオカメラ男 映画を盗撮 “悪の化身”:放送芸能 / 04-30-2010 (Internet Archive, Japanese)

    [7]crank-in.net – 「映画泥棒」の中の人、正体が判明!「笑っていいとも!」でダンスTV初披露 / 01-28-2013 (Japanese)

    [8]TOEI.co.jp – 「NO MORE映画泥棒」映画館でおなじみのキャラクターが、ライセンシー募集を開始! / Posted on 12-26-2013 (Japanese)

    [9]Anime News Network – Anti-Piracy "NO MORE Movie Thief" Mascots Get Full-Scale, Posable Figures / 02-07-2014

    [10]Laughing Squid – ‘No More Movie Thief’ Action Figures Based on a Strange Japanese Anti-Piracy Ad Campaign / 01-22-2014

    [11]Twitter – 映画泥棒(ことカメラ男) (eigadorobo) / Launched on 07-01-2014 (Japanese)

    [12]web R25 – 映画泥棒Twitterが大人気 / 07-03-2014 (Japanese)


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  • 07/20/14--01:35: Top Gear


  • About


    Top Gear is a BBC education television series about auto vehicles, most commonly cars, and is the most widely watched factual television programme in the world. The show is currently presented by Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May, and has featured at least three different anonymous test drivers all known as The Stig. The programme has received acclaim for its visual style and presentation, and criticism for its content and often politically incorrect commentary made by its presenters.


    Cool Wall

    The Cool Wall, introduced in the sixth episode of series one, is a wall on which Clarkson and Hammond decide which cars are cool and which are not by placing photographs of them on to various sections of the wall. The categories are, from left to right; “Seriously Uncool”, “Uncool”, “Cool”, and “Sub Zero”. According to Jeremy, an important part of each car’s coolness factor rested on the extent to which he believed they would impress the actress Kristin Scott Thomas.


    Star ia a Reasonably-Priced Car
    Star in a Reasonably-Priced Car is a segment of Top Gear, where presenter Jeremy Clarkson interviews a celebrity and then shows a clip of their attempt to drive round the Top Gear track, filmed earlier. They are then put on to a board. There have been four reasonably-priced-cars: a Suzuki Liana, Chevrolet Lacetti, Kia Cee’d, and a Vauxhall Astra.


    History


    Top Gear was first aired in 1977 and been cancelled and revive multiple time until, it’s finally revive in 2002 with a new host Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond, and Jason Dawe (which is later replaced with James May) with a mysterious test driver named The Stig. The new series added a new features to the show such as: “Star in a Reasonably Priced Car”, “The Cool Wall”, “The News”, “Power Laps”, and other wacky challenges.


    Richard Hammond’s Accident



    In September 2006, one the host (Richard Hammond) was seriously injured after driving a turbojet named “Vampire”. The show was postponed until Richard had finally recovered. Richard Hammond was driving at 288mph when a tyre burst. The dragster then skidded and flipped over. Hammond had to be cut free from the wreckage.


    Somi Guha’s Lawsuit


    In March 2014, Indian-born actress Somi Guha filed a lawsuit against the BBC for $1.8 million, for a racist term used after building a bridge over the Kok River in the Burma Special. Upon its completion, Clarkson said, “That’s a proud moment, but there’s a slope on it”, and Richard Hammond added, “Yeah, right. It’s definitely higher on that side”. This led to complaints as it is a derogatory term for an Asian person. In April, Top Gear’s executive producer Andy Wilman apologised for the racist remark.


    Reception


    Criticisms


    Top Gear has been criticized for its racist comments, homophobic jokes, environment issues, and promoting irresponsible driving.


    Awards and Impact


    Top Gear had spawned a Reddit page, two different Wiki pages, and a YouTube channel. The show has also won an Emmy, multiple BAFTAs as well as other awards and nominations for these awards in other years. Its popularity has spawned localised versions of the show in countries such as Australia, Russia, and the US.

    Notable Example


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  • 07/20/14--11:29: Dedotated Wam
  • <!--Work In Progress. Add or modify anything that can help this entry.-->

    About

    Dedotated Wam is a mispronunciation of “Dedicated RAM” told by a kid with the Minecraft username “superkai64” at Minecon 2013.

    Origin

    superkai64 is a generic kid that might have a speech impediment. He is a Minecraft player and a YouTuber. Not much is known about him except his recognition of the phrase and his smarts.

    Spread

    Dedotated Wam was first used by him at Minecon 2013 in Nov 2, 2013 as he attempted to ask a technical question about the amount of recommended RAM to add to a dedicated Minecraft server to the panelists. At the same time, ZodiaxEU uploaded a video titled “DEDOTATEDWAM” which shows the clip about him asking the question. As of July 2014, the video reached almost 280,000 views.



    The clip was later used on some instances on 420 MLG Montages.

    On June 21, 2014, PancakePvP uploaded a video of him interviewing “superkai64”. As of July 2014, the video reached 5,000 views.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest


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    About

    Jews and Arabs Refuse to be Enemies is an anti-war social media campaign that aims to promote peace and solidarity among the peoples of Israel and Arab nations in the wake of the Gaza-Israel conflict in June 2014.

    Origin

    On July 10th, 2014, the Facebook page[1] JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies was created by Abraham Gutman, an Isreali college student[5] and Dania Darwish . The following day Gutman[2] introduced the hashtag #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies to promote the Facebook page. In less than three weeks the page gained over 2,000 views.

    Precursor

    In March 2012, a similar social media campaign was launched by Israeli graphic designers Ronny Edry and Michal Tamir under the slogans Israel Loves Iran and “Iran Loves Israel” which sought to bring mutual assurance of peace between the two nations during the escalation of tensions over the Iranian development of nuclear technology.



    Spread

    On July 13th, 2014, Beirut-based American journalist Sulome Anderson[4] posted a selfie of her kissing her Jewish boyfriend white holding a sign which read:

    “Jews and Arabs refuse to be enemies.”


    Within two weeks, the photo gained over 100 likes. On July 21st, the photograph, along with Anderson’s quotes, were featured on ABC News in an article titled “’Jews and Arabs Refuse to Be Enemies’ Proves Love is Bigger Than War.” The hashtag and Facebook page were also covered by The Huffington Post and HLNTV[6].



    In less than a month the hashtag[3] was tweeted out over 4,000 times.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Facebook – JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies

    [2]Twitter – abgutmans

    [3]Topsy – jewsandarabsrefusetobeenemies

    [4]ABC NEws – ‘Jews and Arabs Refuse to Be Enemies’ Proves Love is Bigger Than War

    [5]The Huffington Post – ‘Jews and Arabs Refuse to Be Enemies’ Proves Love is Bigger Than War

    [6]HLNTV‘Refuse To Be Enemies’: A call to end Mideast hate


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  • 07/21/14--11:09: Miley Cyrus Death Hoax
  • Overview

    Miley Cyrus Death Hoax are fabricated rumors concerning the death of recording artist Miley Cyrus, which are often spread on Facebook by malware, phishing and survey scam websites.

    Background

    In September 2008, members of Anonymous circulated an internet death hoax rumor that Cyrus had been killed in a car accident. The rumor was paired with a screenshot of a fake Yahoo! News story[1] and persisted via edits to her Wikipedia page and a front-page link on Digg (shown below).



    Notable Developments

    August 2013

    According to Snopes,[2] a fake news story reporting that Cyrus had committed suicide circulated via Facebook as early as August 2013 (shown below). The story included a link to websites containing survey scams, malware or phishing pages that could compromise the viewer’s Facebook account.



    October 2013

    On October 2nd, 2013, an anonymous user of 4chan‘s /b/ (Random) board initiated a rumor that Cyrus had contracted AIDS (shown below), suggesting that the diagnosis of a potentially terminal illness is the reason behind the singer’s recent breakup with actor Liam Hemsworth and her controversial stage performances. Though it was short-lasted, the hoax led to the use of the hashtag #CureForMiley on Twitter to draw attention to the campaign.



    July 2014

    On July 19th, 2014, a screenshot of Cyrus laying down next to a spilled bottle of prescription medication from a video titled “Blonde SuperFreak Steals the Magic Brain”[3] began circulating online with the headline “{SHOCKING} Miley Cyrus Found Dead In Her Los Angeles Home!” (shown below). According to the Epoch Times,[10] the hoax was primarily spread on Facebook via a survey scam website.



    On the following day, the celebrity news blog Hollywood Life[4] reported that Cyrus was aware of the story and found it “pretty funny.” In the coming days, the hoax was reported on by several other news sites, including The Huffington Post,[5]MTV,[6] The Independent,[7] International Business Times[8] and Crushable.[9]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/21/14--13:02: SoundCloud
  • About

    SoundCloud is an audio-sharing platform with social networking features based in Berlin, Germany.

    History

    In August 2007, Swedish sound designer Alex Ljung and Swedish artist Eric Wahlforss began working on SoundCloud as a platform for recording artists to share music. In an interview with the technology magazine Wired,[2] Ljung revealed that the site was initially made out of frustration for not having a proper platform to collaborate on music. The site SoundCloud.com[5] was launched in October 2008. In April 2009, SoundCloud received €2.5 million in Series A funding from Doughty Hanson Technology Ventures.[1] In January 2011, SoundCloud raised $10 million in Series B funding from Union Square Ventures and Index Ventures.[3] On January 23rd, 2012, SoundCloud announced that had reached more than 10 million users and posted a story wheel on their official blog[4] to mark the occasion (shown below).



    Features

    SoundCloud users can upload audio files to share on their public feeds, with each given a distinctive URL. Audio tracks are automatically visualized as waveforms and users can leave comments at specific parts on a track’s timeline. Registered users are allowed to upload up to 120 minutes of audio to their profile for free and can pay a subscription fee to upload additional content.

    Highlights

    Actual Cannibal Shia LaBeouf

    Actual Cannibal Shia LaBeouf is a comedy song portraying the actor Shia LaBeouf as a homicidal cannibal. The song inspired several photoshopped images and animated GIFs of LeBeouf after it was uploaded to SoundCloud in March 2012.



    Comcast Customer Service Fiasco

    Comcast Customer Service Fiasco refers to the online backlash surrounding a recorded telephone conversation in which tech blogger Ryan Block repeatedly tries to request a Comcast customer service representative to cancel his cable service subscription over the course of an 18 minute-long call. The recording instantly went viral after Block uploaded a portion of the conversation to SoundCloud in July 2014, which ultimately prompted the American cable company to issue a personal apology.



    Traffic

    On July 17th, 2013, USA Today[7] reported that SoundCloud[7] had reached 40 million registered users and 200 million unique listeners worldwide. As of July 2014, the site has a global rank of 206 and a United States rank of 126 on the traffic analytics site Alexa,[6]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Tech Crunch – Now a million on SoundCloud

    [2]Wired – SoundCloud Threatens Myspace

    [3]USVSoundCloud

    [4]SoundCloud Blog – Ten Million

    [5]SoundCloud – SoundCloud

    [6]Alexa – Soundcloud

    [7]USA Today – Who’s listening to SoundCloud?


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  • 07/21/14--14:03: Auschwitz Selfie
  • About

    Auschwitz Selfie refers to a selfie taken by teenager Breanna Mitchell as she stood in front of Auschwitz concentration camp. After Mitchell posted the selfie to Twitter she faced a backlash from people who felt taking a picture in front of the camp, especially featuring a smile, was insensitive and offensive.

    Background

    On July 20th, 2014, Breanna Mitchell tweeted[1] a smiling selfie of herself with a caption which explained she was standing in front of Auschwitz, a concentration camp in Poland.



    In less than 48 hours the tweet gained over 4,000 retweets and over 3,000 favorites. Many of the retweets were critical of the picture, saying it was an inappropriate place to take one. Mitchell, however, retweeted those defending the tweet.



    However later that day Mitchell sent out a tweet which expressed a desire for the tweet to be left alone. As of July 22nd, Mitchell’s twitter feed has been made private.



    Notable Developments

    Media Coverage

    Also on July 20th, Business Insider[2] published an article titled “This Teenager Is Getting Harassed After Her Smiling Selfie At Auschwitz Goes Viral.” The same day the tweet was also covered by Buzzfeed[4] and Newsday.[5] The following day the tweet was covered by the New York Post[3] and The Mirror.[6]

    External References

    [1]Twitter – PrincessBMM

    [2]Business Insider – This Teenager Is Getting Harassed After Her Smiling Selfie At Auschwitz Goes Viral

    [3]NY Post – Smiling Auschwitz selfie sparks Twitter outrage

    [4]Buzzfeed – Teen’s Smiling Selfie At Auschwitz Goes Viral After Inciting Twitter Anger

    [5]Newsday – Teen criticized on Twitter for Auschwitz concentration camp selfie

    [6]The Mirror – Auschwitz selfie teenager faces backlash after posting smiling tweet on death camp visit


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  • 07/21/14--15:00: Pound Town
  • About

    “Pound Town” is a fictional destination that serves as a euphemism for engaging in the act of sexual intercourse. While the term is mostly used in a metaphorical sense in conversations, on the web, Pound Town is often depicted as a geographical location through photoshopped parodies of public transportation tickets, maps and image macros.

    Origin

    The exact origin of “Pound Town” is currently unknown. On July 10th, 2005, Urban Dictionary[1] user The Twelve Inch Pianist submitted an entry for the term “pound town,” defining it as a destination where “rough sex” occurs.

    Spread

    On December 11th, 2010, Urban Dictionary user pigpen102 submitted an entry for “Mayor of Poundtown,” defining it as a title given to a man who is skilled at performing sexually. On October 18th, 2011, Season 2 Episode 5 of the television comedy series Workaholics was broadcast, in which the character Anders Holmvik (played by Anders Holm) pulls up in a car decorated like an American flag and exclaims “All aboard to downtown Pound Town!” (shown below).



    On April 9th, 2012, Redditor obvious_stroll submitted a post claiming to have discovered a couple in a public bathroom “going to pound town” to the /r/AskReddit[6] subreddit. On February 4th, 2014, Redditor globaltourist submitted a photoshopped image of a ticket to “Dick City with a layover in Pound Town” to the /r/funny[3] subreddit, where it gathered more than 2,700 votes (86% upvoted) and 250 comments within five months (shown below).



    On July 16th, Redditor lizgwilson submitted a Captain Picard facepalm image macro joking about being taken to “Poundtown” to the /r/AdviceAnimals[2] subreddit, where it gained over 3,600 votes (94% upvoted) in the first five days (shown below, left). On July 18th, Redditor tardymarty submitted a Redditor’s Wife image macro referencing “Pound Town” to /r/AdviceAnimals[4] (shown below, right), where it accumulated upwards of 2,700 votes (91% upvoted) in 72 hours.



    On July 19th, Redditor QuantumGamer submitted a photograph of a Pound World storefront titled “Forget pound town, take her here” to /r/pics[7] (shown below, left). The same day, Redditor Stewpid submitted a Bad Luck Brian image macro about Pound Town to /r/AdviceAnimals[8] (shown below, right). In the next 48 hours, the posts gained over 930 and 2,000 votes respectively.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/22/14--09:09: Unimpressed Lizard
  • About

    Unimpressed Lizard is a photoshop meme based on an image of a lizard gazing at the camera with a grumpy expression on its face. The cutout image of the lizard is superimposed onto a variety of base images, in a similar vein to many other photoshop memes and image macros that have been inspired by photographs of bored looking subjects.

    Origin

    On July 21st, 2014, Redditor ehar101 submitted a photo titled “My gf is on vacation and sent me this picture. I found it hilarious and thought I’d share” featuring a small, bored looking lizard to the /r/pics[2] subreddit. In less than 24 hours the picture gained over 2,000 points.



    Spread

    Also on July 21st, the original photo was named “Photoshop Battle of the Day” by several sites including Chimpout[4] and Gurt.[5] On July 22nd, Buzzfeed[1] published a round-up of the meme titled “Unimpressed Lizard Is Your New Favourite Meme.” The same day Mashable[3] also published a round-up.

    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    External Links


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  • 07/22/14--10:33: I'm So
  • About

    I’m So is the beginning of a phrase popularized on Facebook and Twitter which goes on to explain why the user is such a stereotypical citizen of their city.

    Origin

    On September 12th, 2009, Twitter user Owtlaw[1] sent out a tweet introducing the hashtag #imsomephis, which went on to explain why he is a prime example of someone from Memphis, Tennessee.



    Spread

    On July 17th, 2014, the first entry for “I’m so (fill in city)” was added to Urban Dictionary[7] by user Benny Blue2 who defined it as:

    “It’s pretty much an attention starved individual stating that they’re proud of being from said city, and stating so by explaining that they are legit by either knowing of an old landmark that has been torn down or may still exist or by taking part in dumb ass past times which would most definitely get you arrested, or by reminiscing about past times, or phrases that no one uses or cares to take part in.


    Also on July 17th, Deadline Detroit[2] published an article titled “Detroiters Reach Back to Tell on Social Media: ’I’m So Detroit I …” which highlighted a trend of people using the phrase “I’m so Detroit” to explain their affinity for the city on Facebook, as well using the hashtag #imsodetroit to express the same sentiment on Twitter. Though the hashtag #imsodetroit was introduced by Twitter user GQue5050[3] on December 10th, 2009, shortly after the introduction of #imsomemphis, the Deadline Detroit article marked a the beginning of a push for local sites to cover the spreading trend. On July 21st, the trend was covered by Chicago Now[6] and on July 22nd, the trend was covered for their respective cities by Alabama Media[4] and HotToddy[5] (Oxford).

    Notable Examples




    External References


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  • 07/22/14--11:12: #LikeAGirl
  • Overview

    #LikeAGirl is a video advertisement for the Always brand of feminine hygiene products which compares the way adults and children mime various behaviors when asked to perform them “like a girl.”

    Background

    On June 26th, 2014, the Always YouTube channel uploaded a video titled “Always #LikeAGirl,” featuring adults and children standing in front of a blue screen who are asked to run, fight and throw “like a girl” (shown below). In the first three weeks, the video gained over 40.4 million views and 31,000 comments.



    Notable Developments

    On Reddit

    The same day the video was released, Redditor fletchleanne submitted it to the /r/TwoXChromosomes[6] subreddit. On June 27th, 2014, Redditor SpintheCork submitted the video to the /r/videos[1] subreddit, where it garnered more than 3,400 votes (66% upvoted) in the next three weeks. In the comments section, the highest-voted comment[4] pointed out that the video was an advertisement and that the actors in the video were likely coached to mimic various stereotypes.

    On Twitter

    Following its release on YouTube, the video began circulating on Twitter with the hashtag #LikeAGirl,[3] with over 120,000 mentions in the next month according to the Twitter analytics site Topsy[2] (shown below).



    On YouTube

    On July 12th, YouTuber UhOhBro uploaded a video titled “Like A Girl? #LikeAGirl”, in which he provides commentary over various cermonial first pitch and FAIL videos.



    On July 15th, the WonderFools YouTube channel uploaded a French language parody of the commercials in which people are asked to perform behaviors “like a geek” (shown below, left). On July 19th, YouTuber Thunderf00t uploaded a video criticizing the viral marketing campaign for exploiting women’s insecurities to sell products (shown below).



    News Media Coverage

    In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the viral advertisement, including Time,[7] The Telegraph,[8] BuzzFeed,[9] Mashable,[10] The Huffington Post,[11] Washington Post[12] and The Federalist.[13]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/22/14--17:54: ToysRus Pokemon Card Kid
  • About

    ToysRus Pokemon Card Kid is a freakout at the kids shopping place, ToysRus, A young boy at the store wants ‘Pokemon’ cards, which are Nintendo trading cards. While the mother says no, he throws a tantrum in front of people in the store. As of July 22, 2014, the video has been watched 1,864,806 times.

    Origin

    Pokemon is a role playing game made by Nintendo, it is very popular. In 1996, The Pokemon Company and Nintendo made Pokemon trading cards to battle, swap, and play. However, the cards (as well as the anime and games) have started selling like crazy, most kids love these cards, while parents hate them.

    Spread

    On Oct 28, 2011, a YouTube video called “Kid goes crazy over Pokemon cards” was made, which featured a young boy freaking out over Pokemon cards at ToysRus, while his mother is mad, the kid is crying and acting like an idiot,

    The mother drags the kid to the door and leaving. The video has become very popular overtime.


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  • 07/23/14--04:26: Spore


  • About

    Spore is a simulation videogame made by Maxis for PC and Mac. In it, the player controls a cell which will evolve into a sapient species that will start to build cities and spaceships, eventually becoming a vast empire in the galaxy.

    Story

    Spore started as a trial version called “Spore Creature Creator” in which the player could make their own creatures and publish them to the gallery, called the Sporepedia. Eventually, it evolved into a game of it’s own called simply Spore, in which the player could make their own creatures, vehicles, and buildings.

    Expansion packs






    The game spawned three expansion packs; Creepy and Cute, Bot Parts, and Galactic Adventures. Creepy and Cute added parts and paints for creatures, meanwhile Galactic Adventures adds the possibility to make adventure planets and captains. Bot Parts added robotic limbs and accessories (I.E. robot arms and limbs or metal plating) and was only available via a code under Dr. Pepper bottlecaps or at participating Taco Bell restaurants with any order of a large drink.

    Related games

    Spore Creatures



    Spore Creatures is an spin-off of Spore, a worm-like creature named Oogie is the main character. Another Oogie, Little Oogie, disappears and Oogie starts a search for him. Unlike Spore, any possible swear will cause the entire name to be censored (for example, naming a creature AlloSauruS will get it’s name censored). Due to that, it has recieved negative reviews.

    Spore Origin



    Spore Origin is a mobile version of the cell stage, in which a cell that the player can evolve and travel around a tide pool. The gameplay could be considered similar to flOw.

    Spore Hero



    Spore Hero is a Wii spin-off that revolves around a mouthless being that evolves out of an egg, trying to beat an evil creature causing red meteors to corrupt the creatures of the planet. The creature also helps other beings during his travel in minigames such as dancing, and editing beasts.

    Spore Hero Arena



    Spore Hero Arena is a DS spin-off of Spore Hero. The player builds a creature and explores the homeland meanwhile playing minigames such as bodyguarding or arenas. The game has been considered similar to Super Smash Brothers.

    Darkspore



    Darkspore is a RPG spin-off in which the player must protect the universe from the Darkspore, an army of corrupted creatures and races. The game contains a Hero Builder which could be compared to the make-your-own character builder from RPGs.

    Sporn (NSFW)



    Sporn is a fan-coined term for pornographic creatures. Normally, Sporn is deleted and the user gets banned. Sporn had an achievement called Bad Baby if the player got their Sporn deleted, but the achievement was taken out of the game as to not fill the Sporepedia with porn. It’s unknown how Sporn started, but it was most likely a Rule 34 takeover. Most of the Sporn creatures have enlarged breasts and anuses or genitals.

    The Grox



    The Grox are cyborg-creatures which live near the center of the galaxy. They have been considered icons of the game and many people have hacked to get the unaccessible parts the Grox have.

    Grox Anthem

    The Grox Anthem is an unusual song that can be heard by allies of the Grox. It is popular through the fandom due to the voices, which are different to the regular Grox voice, meaning they could possibly be enslaved creatures.

    Sporepedia



    The Sporepedia is a page in the Spore web page containing all the player-made content. It is normally filled with strange creatures or things from fandoms. Most of them depict videogames and shows, but there have been cases of meme creatures.

    35min 2005 Demonstartion

    A 35min demonstration was shown at GDCe in 2005. The reléase caused anger in the fandom due to highly different content, such as no blood or mating.

    Creatures







    Many creatures shown have become favorites by the fanbase, and have been attemped to recreate, normally without success. Most of the names were fan-made. The most known ones are Willosaur, a tripod creature with a hand in it’s tail and Splodey, a large spider.

    Most Pirated Game of All Time

    Due to the immense amount of DRM that is linked to Spore, the game quickly became the most pirated game of all time. This is due to the effect that DRM has on games as well as if a game is popular or not. DRM is typically used to stop piracy of video games, but it often has the opposite effect. The game was pirated more than 500,000 times on BitTorrent, making it the most pirated game of all time.

    Parkaboy

    Parkaboy is one of the most known Spore users, who has got the most downloaded conten (sometimes stolen). He won a travel to Maxis office and see GA before release, and was considered the Top Spore User.

    Clark and Stanley



    Clark and Stanley are two almost identical creatures featerud on adventures. The adventures consist of joining them, but they get killed. For example, they go to the beach and put bait to atract dolphins, but are eaten by sharks. He has been compared to South Park characther Kenny due to the recurring death theme.

    Impact

    Spore has been hacked many times, and searching spore in YouTube will make a lot of creation videos appear.

    Search Interest


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  • 07/23/14--10:13: Hot Pepper Challenge
  • About

    The Hot Pepper Challenge is a popular dare game involving eating extremely hot peppers, normally the ghost pepper. Since 2011 the game has become well known for the extreme side effects such as profuse sweating and vomiting and thousands of videos with people attempting the challenge have been uploaded onto YouTube.

    Origin

    On November 5th, 2011, the comedy website Rooster Teeth[1] uploaded a video titled “Ghost Pepper Challenge” which featured three men eating ghost peppers, named the 3rd hottest pepper in the world by the Guinness Book of World Records[2] in 2013. Though the men comment on the pain and heat from the peppers, none appear to have violent reactions.



    On November 11th, 2011, YouTuber WFAE Charlotte[10] uploaded a video of radio personality Marshall Terry completing the hot pepper challenge, during which he sweats profusely, vomits and hallucinates. As of July 2014, the video has gained over 330,000 views.



    Spread

    On February 4th, 2012, YouTuber AyyOnline[3] uploaded a hot pepper challenge which featured him eating a ghost pepper. The video was covered by The Daily Dot[4] on February 6th, 2012. As of July 2014, the video has gained over 5 million views. On April 21st, 2012, YouTuber Chuck From The Bronx[6] uploaded a hot pepper challenge. The video was covered by The Huffington Post[7] and Gawker[8]. As of July 2014, the video has gained over 420,000 views.



    On June 7th, 2012, YouTuber GloZell Green[9] uploaded a hot pepper challenge video. As of July 2014, the video has gained over 18.3 million views and is the most viewed pepper challenge video.



    On April 11th, 2013, Buzzfeed[5] posted a round-up of screenshots from YouTube videos from the hot pepper challenge titled “17 Very Misguided People Who Just Ate The World’s Spiciest Pepper.”

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 07/23/14--12:39: #YesAllBlackPeople
  • About

    YesAllBlackPeople is a Twitter hashtag campaign launched to raise awareness of the racism black people in America deal with. The hashtag was inspired by the anti-misogyny hashtag campaign #YesAllWomen and is used by African Americans to share their personal experiences with racism, personal and instutionalized.

    Background

    On July 23rd, 2014, The Daily Dot[1] published an article titled “17 things white people need to know about #YesAllBlackPeople” which introduced the hashtag and included many examples of racism black Americans face. In less than 24 hours the article was shared across social media over 7,000 times and gained over 1,000 comments.

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 07/24/14--04:46: Gyate Gyate
  • About

    Gyate Gyate (Japanese: ぎゃてコラ, Gyate-Kora), occasionally called as “Ohayou” in English-speaking web, refers to a series of parody illustrations for a grin by Kyouko Kasodani[1] from Touhou Project. In a similar vein to Gununu and Moetron, her facial expression is one of the popular templates for drawing among Japanese amateur illustrators.

    Origin

    The original “Gyate” face is appeared on a 4-panel comic where Marisa Kirisame[2] pokes a bit of fun at Kyouko’s Yamabiko[3] or parrotry nature. This yonkoma[4] manga was written by a Japanese illustrator/mangaka Nekomura Otako[5], and posted to pixiv on April 30th, 2011.[6]


    Translation:

    Marisa: Good Afternoon / Kyouko: Good Afternoon!!
    Marisa: Woof Woof / Kyouko: Woof Woof!!
    Marisa: Meow Meow / Kyouko: Meow Meo-…
    Marisa: C’mon, What’s the matter? Not gonna say it? (snicker snicker) / Kyouko: (tremble tremble tremble)

    Spread

    The people who got inspiration from her grin in the first panel were anonymous users in the Japanese imageboard community Futaba Channel (2chan). They set that facial expression of her as a template of tracing, Futaba’s most famous drawing activity represented by Gununu and Moetron, and became to call it as “Gyate-Kora” (lit. “Gyate Collage”), which “Gyate” comes from Kyouko’s remark in the original game “Gyātē Gyātē” (ぎゃーてー ぎゃーてー). Gyate-Kora started to be practiced on Futaba by the middle of 2011 at the lastest, and it’s said that all Touhou characters including minor characters appearing only in books had been drawn in this style by Futaba users. However, there are no archives for those early works on the web due to the characteristic of Futaba.



    Then, this manner was inported to pixiv circa the middle of 2013, many Gyate-Kora illustrations became to be found on that Japanese illustrators community in that year.[7] Nowadays, various kinds of characters not limited in Touhou are drawn in this “Gyate” style. Additionally, dozens of Gyate illustrations are also found on deviantART.[8] And those illustrations are usually called “Ohayou” in the illustrators community in English-speaking web.

    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    [Not Available]

    External References

    Editor’s Note: Registration is needed to browse the original illustrations listed in this section.

    [1]Touhou Wiki – Kyouko Kasodani

    [2]Touhou Wiki – Marisa Kirisame

    [3]Wikipedia – Yamabiko (folklore)

    [4]Wikipedia – Yonkoma

    [5]pixiv – 「ねこむらヽ(・ω・)ノ」s Profile

    [6]pixiv – 「【東方神霊廟まんが】今日のきょうこさん・2」/「ねこむらヽ(・ω・)ノ」のイラスト / Posted on 04-30-2011

    [7]pixiv – Search results for the tag ぎゃてコラ

    [8]deviantART – Search results for Ohayou and Gyate


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    About

    If Gay Guys Said the Stuff Straight People Say is a viral video in which a gay character mocks statements commonly heard from straight people promoting various homosexual stereotypes. The video inspired a series of parodies exploring racial stereotypes promoted by white people in a similar style to Shit People Say videos.

    Origin

    On May 19th, 2014, YouTuber Daniel-Ryan Spaulding uploaded a video titled “If Gay Guys Said the Shit Straight People Say,” in which a gay character says several statements to a straight character as if their roles were reversed (shown below). In the first two months, the video received more than 1.7 million views and 800 comments.



    Spread

    On June 6th, 2014, the BuzzFeedYellow YouTube channel uploaded a video titled “If Asians Said The Stuff White People Say,” in which Asian actors flip common stereotypes held about topics like Asian religions and inter-racial dating around on white people (shown below). Within two months, the video gained over 5.6 million views and 11,200 comments. On June 12th, BuzzFeedYellow uploaded a Latino version of the series (shown below, right). In six weeks, the video garnered upwards of 1.3 million views and 4,700 comments.



    On June 13th, YouTuber Daniel-Ryan Spaulding uploaded another video titled “If Gay Guys Said the Stuff Straight People Say” (shown below, left). On June 20th, BuzzFeedYellow uploaded a new parody video titled “If Black People Said the Stuff White People Say,” in which black actors are shown saying variations of statements commonly (shown below, right). The video was subsequently highlighted by UpWorthy.[2] Over the next month, the video gained more than 2.8 million views and 4,300 comments.



    On June 23rd, The Huffington Post[1] published an article about the “If Asians Said the Stuff White People Say” video, which provided alternatives to many of the culturally insensitive statements from the parody.

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 07/24/14--09:45: Sad Jack White
  • About

    Sad Jack White is photoshop meme based on a televised image of American musician Jack White looking upset while watching a Chicago Cubs baseball game at the Wrigley Field in July 2014. Upon being shared on Twitter, the still shot quickly became dubbed the “Sad Jack White” in the tradition of other dispirited celebrity memes like Sad Keanu and Sad Kanye.

    Origin

    On June 22nd, 2014, Twitter user AndrewCieslak[1] tweeted a screenshot of a televised Chicago Cub’s baseball game during which Jack White, who was visiting the city to perform a concert, was caught on camera looking rather upset while dressed in a Cubs’ jersey in the crowd. Within 48 hours, the tweet gained over 600 retweets and over 600 favorites.



    The following day Slate[2] published an article titled “Sad Jack White Is the New Sad Kanye Is the New Sad Keanu” which featured the photo of White photoshopped into a photo with Sad Kanye and Sad Keanu.



    Spread

    On July 23rd, ESPN[3] published a post titled “Five best memes of Jack White looking utterly miserable watching the Cubs” which featured a round-up of the best examples of the meme taken from Twitter. The same day Time Out Chicago[4] published a post titled “Why so sad, Jack White?” which featured White photoshopped into photos of Chicago. The meme was also covered the same day by several other sites including Billboard[6] and Mashable.[7] On July 24th, SheKnows[5] published a post titled “6 Memes of sad Jack White and sad Kanye West hanging out” which featured examples of the two memes photoshopped together.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 07/24/14--11:26: #TimeTitles
  • Overview

    #TimeTitles is a hashtag associated with tweets featuring satirical news headlines that try to explain African American culture or slang in an out-of-touch way. The hashtag was inspired by Time Magazine’s superficial coverage of the term’s popularity in an article titled “This is What ‘Bae’ Means.”

    Background

    On July 23rd, 2014, Time Magazine[1] published an article titled “This is What ‘Bae’ Means," which described not only the definition but the origin of the word “bae,” prompted by Pharrell Williams’ same-day release of his latest music video “Come Get It Bae. Upon its publication, Twitter user PiaGlenn[2] introduced the hashtag #TimeTitles to poke fun at Time’s coverage of trends which began in the African American community with the fictional title “Who in the world is Daquan, anyway?” which references the fictional young black man often joked about within black communities on Twitter.



    Notable Developments

    On July 24th, The Root[4] published an article titled “Time Tried to Explain the Word ‘Bae’ and Twitter Went in With #TimeTitles.” The same day the hashtag was covered by several sites including Hip Hop Wired[5] and UpRoxx.[6] Within 24 hours the hashtag[3] was tweeted out over 27,000 times.



    External References


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  • 07/24/14--11:36: Bae
  • About

    “Bae” is a term of endearment for a significant other, similar to other pet names derived from the word “baby,” such as “B” and “boo.” Following the popularization of the term through various hip hop and R&B songs in the early 2010s, “bae” also became alternatively interpreted by some as a backronym for “before anyone else.”

    Origin

    The exact origin of “bae” is unknown. On March 14th, 2003, Urban Dictionary[1] user Trong submitted an entry for “bae,” defining it as a “bastardization of the term ‘babe’.”



    Spread

    On August 11th, 2006, Urban Dictionary[6] user bubbless defined “bae” as “a lover or significant other.” On December 12th, 2008, Urban Dictionary[7] user DreaBaeXXX defined the term as a Western Florida synonym for the words “baby, boo, sweetie.” On September 2nd, 2011, an entry for “Bae” was submitted to the online dictionary InternetSlang.[4] On August 14th, 2012, the @TeensAdvices[5] Twitter feed listed “bae” along with several other similar terms of endearment (shown below). In three years, the tweet accumulated over 730 reweets and 140 favorites.



    On January 18th, 2014, Redditor drgigglez submitted a screenshot of a tweet in which a woman is shown “twerking on baes grave” to the /r/cringepics[3] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 3,200 votes (90% upvoted) prior to being archived.



    On March 29th, YouTuber superkian13 uploaded a video titled “Do You Got a Bae?”, featuring several comedy sketches in which he mocks various slang terms. In four months, the video garnered more than 1.1 million views and 3,800 comments (shown below, left).



    “Before Anyone Else”

    According to the Visual Thesaurus,[8] the earliest known use of BAE as an acronym for “before anyone else” was posted in a tweet from 2011:

    “My girl hates being called bae but i still call her that bc it stands for Before Anyone Else”

    On May 1st, 2014, YouTuber Shane Dawson uploaded a video titled “The Bae Challenge,” in which he and fellow YouTuber Joey Graceffa argue about whether BAE originated as an acronym for “before anyone else” (shown below). In the first three months, the video gained over 900,000 views and 3,400 comments.



    On July 4th, Twitter user Alex Thomson[2] asked followers for a definition of “Bae,” to which user @NuclearTeeth replied that it is an abbreviated version “baby/babe” and a backronym for “before anyone else.”



    Bae Caught Me Slippin

    On October 9th, 2012, Twitter user @NostrandAv shared a photo of a woman taking a picture herself pretending to be asleep, with the caption “Females Be Like ‘Bae Caught Me Slippin’”. The tweet inspired a series of intentionally failed “caught me sleeping” selfie photographs.



    “Come Get it Bae”

    On July 23rd, 2014, artist Pharrell Williams released the music video for the track “Come Get it Bae” (shown below).



    The same day, Time Magazine[9] published an article titled “This is What ‘Bae’ Means,” which outlined the slang term’s history and defined it as a synonym for “boo” or “babe.” Shortly after, Twitter user PiaGlenn[10] introduced the hashtag #TimeTitles to poke fun at Time’s coverage of trends launched by the African American community, with the first example referencing the fictional young black character Daquan.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – bae

    [2]Twitter – @mister_tee

    [3]Reddit – I miss my bae

    [4]Internet Slang – bae

    [5]Twitter – @TeensAdvices

    [6]Urban Dictionary – bae

    [7]Urban Dictionary – bae

    [8]Visual Thesaurus – Bae Watch the Ascent of a new pet name

    [9]Time – This is What Bae Means

    [10]Twitter – PiaGlenn


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