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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 10/22/14--11:19: Shake It Off
  • About

    “Shake It Off” is a 2014 pop song co-written and performed by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift as the lead single for her upcoming fifth studio album 1989. Upon the same-day release of the single and the music video in August 2014, the song was mostly met by positive reviews from the critics; however, some of the dance routines featured in the music video sparked a minor controversy for alleged cultural appropriation of black stereotypes.

    Origin

    On August 18th, 2014, Taylor Swift’s official Vevo YouTube channel[1] uploaded the video for “Shake it Off.” The video features Swift awkwardly attempting several different forms of dance, including ballet, modern and hip hop, while surrounded by professional dancers. Within 48 hours of its release,[2] the music video gained over 3 million views, and as of October 2014, the video has gained more than 190 million views.



    Criticism of Cultural Appropriation

    The same day the video was released, Odd Future’s rapper Earl Sweatshirt posted several tweet condemning Swift’s video for “perpetuating black stereotypes” and for being “inherently offensive and ultimately harmful," while admitting he hadn’t watched the video (shown below).



    The same day, the women’s interest blog Jezebel published an article criticizing Swift’s video for being a “cringeworthy mess.” Also on August 18th, Tumblr[19] user Orhgasm defended Swift in a post claiming that nothing about the video was racist. In the first 24 hours, the post gained over 1,500 notes. Meanwhile, Mashable[14] published a compilation of Twitter reactions to the music video. In the coming days, several other news sites published articles about the video controversy, including The Daily Dot,[15] Daily Beast,[16] Metro [17]and Billboard.[18]

    Spread

    On August 19th, USA Today[6] named “Shake it off” the song of the week. On August 27th, Forbes[7] announced the song debuted at number one on the pop charts. On September 11th, Taylor Swift’s Vevo YouTube channel uploaded three videos featuring outtakes from the music video. As of October 2014, the highest performing video has gained over 3 million views.



    Notable Examples

    Parodies

    On August 21st, YouTuber Miranda Sings[4] uploaded a parody of “Shake it Off” in which she digitally inserted herself into the video. As of October 2014, the video has gained over 6.1 million views. On September 9th, YouTuber KimmiSmile[5] uploaded a parody of “Shake it Off” which focuses on procrastinating. As of October 2014, the video has gained over 320,000 views.



    On September 19th, YouTuber lisbug[3] uploaded a parody of “Shake it Off” which replaced the song’s lyrics with angry comments her past videos had received. As of October 2014, the video has gained over 3.8 million views. On September 28th, YouTuber Bart Baker[6] uploaded a parody of “Shake it Off” which mocked Taylor Swift. As of October 2014, the video has gained over 6.8 million views.



    Notable Covers



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 10/22/14--13:40: [Clenches Fist]
  • About

    [Clenches Fist] is an action cue used in online conversations to convey a sudden rush of intense and typically undesirable feelings, such as anger, resentment or frustration, in a manner similar to the use of the expression [Rustling Intensifies].

    Origin

    The exact origin of the action cue is unknown. On May 21st, 2005, RPG.net[5] Forums member StephenO submitted a thread titled “Clenches Fist‘Nooooooooooooo!’”, mocking a scene from the film Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith in which the villain Darth Vader clenches his fist and yells “No!” after discovering his wife Padme has died.



    Spread

    On November 18th, 2011, Steam Forums[2] member chaotic replied to a thread to complain about Valve’s new social features with the action cue “clinches [sic] fist.”



    On the following day, Mirror Moon Forums[4] member AlextheLazy used the action cue in a reply to a post about the vampires in video games produce by the Japanese game company Type-Moon. On September 27th, 2013, DeviantArtist[3] DetectiveMar submitted a text post titled “Superhero meme yuuuuus,” which included the action cue “clinches fist dramatically.”

    Notable Examples

    On Tumblr

    In October 2014, the action cue began circulating on Tumblr[6] in text posts featuring sarcastic responses to various fandoms, typically employing the phrasal template “Oh you’re into X? Man I love the way they just [clenches fist] Y.” On October 21st, Tumblr user That-One-Trashy-Weeaboo[1] submitted a post about the Japanese video game franchise Danganronpa with the “[clenches fist]” template. That same day, Tumblr user knneki posted a compilation of “[clenches fist]” posts. In the first 24 hours, the posts gathered upwards of 420 and 950 likes respectively.



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]Tumblr – that-one-trashy-weeaboo

    [2]Steam Forums – Add a friend

    [3]DeviantArt – Superhero Meme yuss

    [4]Mirror Moon Forums – Least scary vampire in Type-Moon

    [5]RPG.net – Clenches Fist Nooo

    [6]Tumblr – clenches fist


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  • 10/22/14--15:17: Eyeless Jack
  • About

    Eyeless Jack is a creepypasta story about a man named Mitch talking about his experience with a creature he calls “Eyeless Jack”, which is known to eat peoples kidneys.


    Click here to read the story

    Origin

    The story was written on February 25th, 2012 by Creepypasta wiki user Azelf5000[1], although the image itself dates back to August 18th, 2010.

    Spread

    Nearly a month after the story was made, it was read by the popular YouTube creepypasta narrator, MrCreepyPasta[2], making its popularity grow by the day as theories, fan art and even masks of Eyeless Jack started popping up on DeviantArt and other sites.

    Fan Art




    Search Interest



    [1]Creepypasta Wiki – Azelf5000

    [2]YouTube – MrCreepyPasta


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  • 10/22/14--15:26: Common White Girl
  • About

    Common White Girl is a novelty Twitter account which capitalizes on the stereotypical behavior of a middle class American white girl which are often referenced online such as a love of Pumpkin Spice Latte and selfies.

    Origin

    On July 25th, 2014, the Twitter account CommonWhiteGirl[1] was created. The account sends out tweets which represent stereotypical tweets from a middle class American white girl in her teens or early twenties, the tweets focus on pop culture references often tied to Disney, complaints about her appearance and attraction to young male celebrities like the members of one direction. As of October 2014, the account has sent out over 5,000 tweets and has gained over 670,000 followers.



    Precursor

    A similar Twitter account called girlposts,[2] which has since its creation changed its display name to Common White Girl, was created in April of 2010. As of October 2014, the account has sent out over 56,000 tweets and has gained over 4.8 million followers.

    Search Interest



    External References

    [1]Twitter – CommonWhiteGirI

    [2]Twitter – girlposts


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    Editor’s Note: This is my first actual article, if someone could help me out it’d be great. Thanks :) ---Hakkron


    Overview
    The 2014 Canadian Parliament Hill Shootings were a set of shootings that happened on the morning of October 22nd, 2014. Two people were killed, including the shooter shortly afterwards.

    Online Reaction




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  • 10/23/14--10:49: Marlins Man
  • About

    Marlins Man is the nickname given to Miami Marlins fan Laurence Leavy[2] who rose to viral fame after being repeatedly spotted in the front-row seat behind the batter’s box wearing the Miami baseball team’s bright-orange jersey and visor at various Major League Baseball (MLB) matches and other major sporting events in the United States.

    Origin

    Laurence Leavy, a 58-year-old Miami-based lawyer, has been a Marlins season-ticket holder since the team’s foundation in 1993. In addition to being an avid fan of Florida’s collegiate and professional sports teams, Leavy has attended hundreds of major professional sporting events in America; by his own count, Leavy has gone to 27 NFL Super Bowls, over 200 NBA playoff matches and at least 85 MLB World Series games. Leavy’s obsession with the Marlins jersey was first highlighted by TV broadcast screen-capture blog 30FPS[6] in October 2012, when his standout presence behind the home plate was captured on camera during a MLB match between St. Louis Cardinals and San Francisco Giants (shown below).



    Spread

    On October 24th, 2012, the sports news blog SBNation[1] published an article titled “Who is the mystery Marlins fan at the World Series?”, which identified the Marlins fan as Miami-based lawyer Laurence Leavy and noted his appearances at other baseball games. On the following day, Leavy launched the @Marlins_Man[8] Twitter feed to highlight photographs of himself at various games.



    Throughout October 2012, several news sites published articles about Leavy, including NBC Bay Area,[3] Miami Herald[4] and Deadspin.[5] However, Leavy remained relatively unexposed until October 21st, 2014, when he was spotted behind the home plate during Game One of the World Series between the Kansas City Royals and the San Francisco Giants (shown below). Shortly after the broadcast of the game, the hashtag #MarlinsMan was mentioned more than 2,500 times on Twitter.



    News Media Coverage

    The return of the “Marlins Man” at the 2014 World Series games was promptly picked up by various local news publications, including Kansas City Star[10] and Miami Herald[11], as well as U.S. national news sites like CBS Sports[12], ABC News[13], USA Today[14] and the Washington Post,[15] some of which likened Leavy to “Where’s Waldo” of the sports world. According to Leavy, the Royals owner had offered him a private suite in exchange for agreeing to move to another seat before the game, but he refused.[7]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/23/14--13:49: Christina Hoff Sommers
  • About

    Christina Hoff Sommers is an American author and self-described equity feminist known for her criticisms contemporary Western or “third-wave” feminism. Sommers has been accused of being a conservative anti-feminist by critics and became a notable figure among GamerGate supporters in September 2014.

    Early Career

    In 1994, Sommers released the book Who Stole Feminism? How Women Have Betrayed Women,[3] which argued that ideological “gender feminists” had over taken the women’s movements on college campuses. In 2000, Sommers released The War Against Boys: How Misguided Policies are Harming Our Young Men,[4] arguing that early education institutions had enacted policies causing boys to fall behind girls in school.

    Online History

    On December 23rd, 2009, the American Enterprise Institute YouTube channel uploaded a video in which Sommers addresses the question “Why aren’t there more female scientists?”, claiming it had to do with “preferences and aspirations” (shown below).



    In July 2011, Sommers launched the @CHSommers[6] Twitter feed, gathering upwards of 24,000 followers over the next four years. On October 4th, 2013, Sommers participated in an “ask me anything” thread on the /r/IAmA[5] subreddit. In the comments section, Sommers responded to questions saying that she considers herself an equity feminist, that misandry was “rampant” in western society and that schools had become “toxic environments for little boys.”

    Factual Feminist Series

    On April 10th, 2014, the first in Sommer’s “Facual Feminist” series was uploaded to YouTube, which analyzed the statistics behind the purported “gender wage gap” (shown below). Over the next six months, 18 additional episodes in the web series were released on the American Enterprise Institute YouTube channel.



    GamerGate Support

    On September 16th, 2014, the American Enterprise Institute YouTube channel uploaded a video in their “Factual Feminist” series titled “Are video games sexist?”, in which host Sommers refutes arguments by feminist media critic Anita Sarkeesian (shown below). In the first three weeks, the video gained over 440,000 views and 7,700 comments. As the video began circulating online, GamerGaters began referring to Sommers as “Based Mom.”



    Criticism

    On September 1st, 1994, the Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting[7] progressive media watch group published a critique of Sommer’s Who Stole Feminism titled “The ‘Stolen Feminism’ Hoax,” claiming she was guilty of making “unsubstantiated charges.” On July 2nd, 2000, The Washington Post[8] published a review of The War Against Boys, which accused the book of being “inexcusably misleading” and “a conservative polemic.” On September 17th, 2014, Kotaku[2] published an article about Sommers titled “Conservative Critic Argues That Game Culture is For Guys,” which chronicled Sommers’ career history and questioned assertions made in her “Are Video Games Sexist?” video. That day, Sommers posted a tweet announcing that she was a “former sixties flower child/socialist” and was currently a “registered Democrat-- with libertarian leanings” (shown below).[1]



    Also on September 17th, The Medium[9] published a “factcheck” article on many criticisms made against Sommers. On September 19th, YouTuber Jonathan Mann uploaded an “auto-tune” rebuttal to Sommers’ “Are Video Games Sexist?” video, in which he sings a song criticizing Sommers’ arguments (shown below, left).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/23/14--14:52: Ghostbusters
  • About

    Ghostbusters is an American horror comedy film about a group of men who battle ghosts and other supernatural creatures in New York City.

    History

    Ghostbusters was released on June 8th, 1984. The film stars Bill Murray as Dr. Peter Venkman, Dr. Raymond Stantz as Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis as Dr. Egon Spengler and Ernie Hudson as Winston Zeddmore, the titular ghost busters. The film also stars Sigourney Weaver as Dana Barrett and Annie Potts as Janine Melnitz. Ghostbusters II was released on June 16th, 1989.

    Related Memes

    “There is no Dana, on Zuul”

    There is no Dana, only Zuul is a memorable quote from Ghostbusters. In online conversations, its snowclone form “There is no X, only Zuul” can be used to refer to someone or something that appears to have been possessed by a demon or an unpopular belief. The phrase was first uttered in Ghostbusters by Dana Barrett (played by Sigourney Weaver) who hires the team to remove a ghost from her New York City apartment. Later in the investigation, Ghostbuster Peter Venkman (played by Bill Murray) finds Barrett possessed by the spirit of the demonic demigod Zuul, at which point Barrett says the line:



    Peter Venkman: Dana? It’s Peter.
    Dana Barrett: There is no Dana, there is only Zuul.
    Peter Venkman: Ol’ Zuula you nut, now c’mon. C’mon. I want to talk to Dana. Dana. Just relax, c’mon. Dana. Dana. Can I talk to Dana?
    Dana Barrett: [deep demonic voice]There is no Dana, only Zuul.
    Peter Venkman: What a lovely singing voice you must have.

    The earliest known use of the phrase appeared on the programming language message board PerlMonks[3] in December 2000, when the forum user amelinda referenced the quote to express his or her distaste for the commercialization of Christmas.

    The Pumpkin Dance

    The Pumpkin Dance is a YouTube video of a man dressed in all black wearing a Jack O’Lantern mask dancing to the theme song from the 1984 film Ghostbusters. The clip, which originally aired on the KXVO news channel in Omaha, Nebraska during a Halloween broadcast in 2006, went on to spawn several mash-up videos, remixes and photoshopped GIFs. The “Pumpkin Dance” segment first aired on Omaha, Nebraska’s local news station KXVO[1] during a 10 PM news broadcast on Halloween, October 31st, 2006. Without explanation, a man in a black unitard and a pumpkin mask was shown dancing to the Ghostbusters theme song[2] in front of a graveyard backdrop. On November 2nd, the clip was uploaded to KXVO’s official YouTube channel, where it has received more than 1.2 million views as of October 2012.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/24/14--10:09: Actually It's About Ethics
  • About

    “Actually it’s about ethics in videogame journalism” is a phrase often photoshoped onto screenshots taken from horror movies or videogames as a humorous response to the Gamergate movement. Proponents of the movement frequently used the phrase in related discussion. The images are created to mock the over-use of the phrase.

    Origin

    The earliest example of the phrase being paired with a still from a horror movie comes from a tweet sent out on October 15th, 2014, by Twitter user Alejandrobot[1], who captioned a still of the horror film It. Within two weeks the tweet recieved over 3,000 favorites and over 2,000 retweets.



    Spread

    On October 24th, 2014, the single topic Tumblr blog itsaboutethicsingamesjournalism[2] launched. Also on October 2014, the Tumblr blog actuallyethics[4] launched. The same day the meme was covered by BoingBoing.[3] The meme has also spread on Twitter through the hashtag #germergoat. The hashtag was introduced by Twitter user zpxlng[5] on October 24th. In less than 24 hours it was tweeted out more than 700 times.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/24/14--11:28: "Afraid to Ask" Andy
  • About

    “Afraid to Ask” Andy is an advice animal image macro series featuring a still image of Andy Dwyer (played by Chris Pratt), one of the main characters from the American TV sitcom Parks and Recreation, captioned with various confessions of one’s ignorance in current events or common knowledge followed by the phrase "…and at this point I’m afraid to ask.”

    Origin

    The caption stems from a memorable quote uttered by Andy Dwyer, who is portrayed as an oblivious but lovable city worker in the fictional town of Pawnee, in Season 6 Episode 16 “A New Slogan”[5] originally aired on March 13th, 2014.



    On October 23rd, 2014, Redditor john_solo76 created a post titled “Afraid to Ask Andy – Reddit is hard to follow sometimes”, featuring a photo of Dwyer with the caption “I don’t know what GamerGate is / And at this point I’m too afraid to ask” (shown below). In the first 24 hours, the post gained over 3,800 upvotes and 2,000 comments on the /r/AdviceAnimals[2] subreddit.



    Spread

    On the same day, Redditor silkysmooth190 submitted an Afraid to Ask Andy image macro expressing ignorance about net neutrality to /r/AdviceAnimals[4] (shown below, left). On October 24th, 2014, Redditor I_Am_Batman_For_Real posted an Afraid to Ask Andy image macro joking about the online fandoms for actor Nicolas Cage to /r/AdviceAnimals.[3] In less than 24 hours, the posts received more than 3,300 votes (87% upvoted).



    The same day, the tech news blog Mashable[1] published an article highlighting several notable examples from the series.

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


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  • 10/24/14--13:26: Local Man Ruins Everything
  • About

    “Local Man Ruins Everything” is an image macro meme taken from the television show The Simpsons. The meme involves photoshopping someone’s image into the newspaper article under the headline “Local Man Ruins Everything.”

    Origins

    The meme originated from an episode of The Simpsons titled “Jaws Wired Shut,” which first aired on January 27th, 2002. The episode features a framed newspaper article with a picture of Homer Simpson under the headline “Local Man Ruins Everything.” The image first appeared online when Redditor oopsifell posted it to the r/Simpsons[1] subreddit on February 4th, 2013.

    Spread

    The image was added to the r/Simpsons Reddit on February 7th, 2014, by Redditor cayal3.

    Notable examples




    Related Memes

    Flordia Man

    Florida Man is a Twitter feed that curates news headline descriptions of bizarre domestic incidents involving a male subject residing in the state of Florida. The tweets are meant to be humorously read as if they were perpetrated by a single individual dubbed “the world’s worst superhero.”

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/24/14--13:57: #Ebowla
  • About

    #Ebowla, a portmanteau of the words “bowl” and “Ebola”, is a tongue-in-cheek hashtag that began circulating on Twitter after news media outlets reported that New York-based doctor Craig Spencer had gone bowling in Brooklyn after contracting the Ebola virus in West Africa.

    Origin

    On October 23rd, 2014, The New York Times[1] reported that doctor Craig Spencer, who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea, Africa, had been placed in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center after testing positive for the virus. The article also revealed that Spencer had traveled on the subway and visited a bowling alley in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Following the news, Twitter users began joking about the doctor’s bowling alley visit with the hashtag #Ebowla.[3]

    Spread

    That evening actor Jason Biggs joked that the doctor went bowling intentionally for the puns on Twitter,[3] receiving upwards of 870 favorites and 520 retweets in the next 24 hours. According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy,[4] there were over 2,100 tweets containing the keyword “ebowla” in the first 24 hours.



    News Media Coverage

    On October 23rd, The New York Times[5] Well blog reported that it would be difficult for Ebola to spread on a bowling ball or any other hard, dry surfaces. On October 24th, Time Magazine[6] published an op-ed by writer Charlotte Alter titled “The #Ebowla Jokes Need to Stop,” which criticized the Twitter jokes and those who scrutinized Dr. Spencer and his character. In the coming days, additional news sites reported on the hashtag, including Epoch Times,[7] The Daily Dot[8] and E! Online.[9]

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/24/14--22:16: Joshua Feuerstein

  • About

    Joshua Feuerstein is an American evangelist, internet and social media personality, who frequently uploads Facebook videos documenting his thoughts on a variety of subjects related to Christianity. He is best known online for his outspoken criticism of atheism and the scientific theory of evolution.

    Online History

    Feuerstein’s official Facebook page[1] was created on April 7th, 2014 and has almost 900,000 likes as of October 2014. His first video, uploaded April 8th, was a motivational sermon aimed at people with self-esteem issues.[2]

    On May 24th, he uploaded a video titled “Dear Mr. Atheist” in which he claimed to “destroy evolution in 3 minutes”.[3] It quickly went viral, amassing more than 19,000 likes and 200,000 shares as of October 2014. On June 3rd, the video was uploaded to Youtube by 438stroker. It has been poorly received there, with over 4,000 dislikes.


    Reputation and Reception

    Feuerstein has faced intense online criticism from atheists and proponents of evolution. The antitheist blog WWJTD published a blog post on June 9th in which the author provided a line-by-line refutation of the arguments made by Feuerstein in his “Dear Mr. Atheist” video.[4]

    The most prolific of Feuerstein’s detractors has been The Amazing Atheist, who has uploaded several videos lambasting the perceived lack of logic and understanding of science present in Feuerstein’s arguments. The first of these videos, titled “Christian ‘Disproves’ Evolution?”, was uploaded on June 2nd.[5]


    Personal Life

    Feuerstein is a former pastor and currently works as a featured speaker at national and international events. He has also been the host and guest of many television and radio shows.[6]

    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]Facebook – Joshua Feuerstein

    [2]Facebook – $100 CHALLENGE!!!

    [3]Facebook – Dear Mr. Atheist

    [4]Patheos – WWJTD

    [5]Youtube – Christian “Disproves” Evolution?

    [6]Joshua Feuerstein – About


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  • 10/25/14--11:56: Laughing Tom Cruise
  • About

    Laughing Tom Cruise is a reaction image and exploitable meme involving collage pictures featuring various surimposed faces of Tom Cruise maniacally laughing. First used as a reaction face to express hilarity, the meme expanded itself by covering other public figures, anime characters and eventually having its own memegenerator macro.

    Origin

    Following the leaked video of an interview with Tom Cruise about Scientology during Project Chanology, thus as early as 2008, remixed containing only the segment in which the actor can be seen laughing began to appear on Youtube (shown below):



    Because of Cruise’s public image, videos and photographs of him laughing hysterically became associated with him. On peculiar photo, taken during a Yahoo conference in March 2006[1], would stand out:


    Spread

    The photograph was then modified to include two other faces laughing (shown below). This version would then be used as an Advice Animal macro on memegenerator, starting on december 15th 2012[2], displaying over 165 pages of variations to date.



    A wikia page[5] on the macro phenomenon shows that it gained momentum among Spanish netizens under the name Laughing Tom. It also inspired two different tumblr sites dedicated to the phenomenon, one about Tom Cruise specifically[3] and the other about anime variations on the meme[4].

    Examples

    Parodies



    Macros



    External References


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  • 10/26/14--08:45: Lelf
  • About

    Lelf (a portmanteau of the words Lel and Elf) is a name given to a laughing elf character, whose face is often used as an exploitable for edits.

    Origin

    The original image (pictured below) comes from the Pathfinder tabletop role-playing game’s Ultimate Campaign book, released in May 2013[1]. One of the illustrations depicts an elf, laughing at the attempts of a halfling trying to charm the elf’s companion.


    Spread

    The first traces of spread can be dated back to February 25th, 2014[2], to a thread on 4chan’s /tg/ (tabletop games) board. Though the elf was known for quite some time, the name “Lelf” wasn’t given until September 29th, 2014[3]. Over time, many edits have surfaced, where the elf’s face is photoshopped on top on other images.

    Examples


    External References


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  • 10/26/14--10:18: The Koolaid Point
  • About

    The Koolaid Point is a theory coined by programming instructor and game developer Kathy Sierra to describe a point in which brands become hated because of the fame they are gathering instead of valid criticism of their work. The term became used to cover people as well, especially women and the harassment they receive.

    Origin

    On October 7th 2014, Kathy Sierra, known for her work and her publications on the Javascript program and Sun mycrosystems, wrote a lenghty post on her website Serious Pony[1], titled Trouble at the Koolaid Point, in which she described what she endured during the last ten years of facing harassment online, most notably concerning the 2007 case in which well-known hacker weev doxxed her[2] and send her threats. In the post, she referred to an article she wrote in August 2005 called Physics of Passion: The Koolaid Point[5] in which she coined the term Koolaid Point, inspired by the drinking the koolaid figure of speech, to describe a point in which a brand is hated because of the popularity it gains.
    She then went on to explain that the phrase can also apply to people in general.

    Spread

    On October 8th 2014, news website Wired republished the post unedited as an article entitled Why the Trolls Will Always Win[3]. The story was picked by The Guardian[4] on October’s 9th, in an article by Jess Zimmerman linking the concept to Gamergate. The post was also shared to other websites such as metafilter[6] or the Reddit gamerghazi subchannel[7].

    External References

    [1]Serious Pony – Trouble at the Koolaid Point

    [2]Wikipedia – Kathy Sierra’s Harassment

    [3]Wired – Why the Trolls Will Always Win

    [4]The Guardian – The truth about trolls and the men they worship

    [5]Head Rush – Physics of Passion: The Koolaid Point

    [6]Metafilter – Trouble at the Koolaid Point

    [7]Reddit – Gamerghazi


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  • 10/27/14--09:00: Now That's What I Call X
  • About

    Now that’s what i call X is an online catchphrase and exploitable fad parodying the album covers of the online hit music seller store NOWmusicstore.com[1].

    Origin

    This fad derived from the album covers of the music relases. Including UK and Ireland music artists. Then online users decided to remix these covers.
    The origin is uncertain. But it can be assumpted that the 4chan users created the earliest deratives related to the internet slang term edgy

    Notable Examples

    External References

    [1]NowMusicStore – Home

    [2]Archieve.moe – Search Results


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  • 10/27/14--11:46: Lincoln MKC Commercials
  • About

    Lincoln MKC Commercials are TV and online video advertisements for Lincoln Motor Company’s new line of crossover SUVs in which American actor Matthew McConaughey delivers a series of moody monologues behind the wheel in the style reminiscent of his character Rustin Cohle from the American TV crime drama series True Detective. Upon launching in early September 2014, the commercials quickly inspired a variety of parodies poking fun at the overly serious demeanor and vaguely introspective quotes delivered by the actor.

    Origin

    On September 4th, 2014, Lincoln Motor Company’s YouTube channel uploaded a series of new commercials featuring McConaughey behind the wheel of the MKC compact crossover (shown below).



    Spread

    On the same day, Redditor KyleSJohnson submitted the “Bull” commercial to the /r/TrueDetective[1] subreddit, remarking that McConaughey seemed to be playing a character similar to his portrayal of Rust Cohle from the television drama series True Detective. On September 22nd, The Ellen Show aired a parody of the “Bull” commercial in which host Ellen DeGeneres appears in McConaughey’s back seat (shown below, left). On October 15th, South Park featured a parody of the Lincoln commercial in Season 18 Episode 4 titled “Handicar” (shown below, right).



    On October 25th, 2014, Saturday Night Live aired several parody versions of the commercials in which actor Jim Carrey mimics McConaughey (shown below). The following day, a YouTube upload of the parodies was submitted to the /r/television[2] and /r/videos[3] subreddits, where it gained over 3,900 votes (89% upvoted) and 4,500 votes (94% upvoted) in the first 24 hours respectively.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 10/27/14--12:36: Oppression Olympics
  • About

    “Oppression Olympics” refers to arguments in which inequalities faced by a group are dismissed for being considered less important than those faced by another group. While it was originally used inside feminist circles to address race-related grievances within the feminist movement, the term has been used online to mock those who seek approval or praise for being more disadvantaged than others.

    Origin

    In 1993, the phrase “oppression olympics” was coined by feminist author and activist Elizabeth “Betita” Martínez to challenge the idea of the “hierarchy of oppressions” when addressing inequalities faced by minorities.[13]

    Spread

    On April 29th, 2008, Urban Dictionary[2] user Allison Amy submitted an entry for “Oppression Olympics.” On May 6th, the race and pop culture website Racialicious[3] published an article titled “Re-Examining the Phrase ‘Oppression Olympics’”, which discussed usage of the term among minority groups. On January 28th, 2010, an entry for “Oppression Olympics” was submitted the the Geek Feminism Wiki.[4] On January 7th, 2013, Redditor 2129096947 submitted an oppression olympics infographic to the /r/TumblrInAction[12] subreddit (shown below).



    On July 21st, 2014, YouTuber Shoe0nHead uploaded a video titled “Oppression_olympics.mp4,” in which she mocked third-wave feminist grievances expressed on Tumblr for being unwarranted in Western countries (shown below). Within three months, the video gained over 200,000 views and 5,100 comments.



    On August 23rd, 2014, Kotaku[8] published an article in the “Talk Amongst Yourselves” section of the video game blog titled “Gaming Media and the Oppression Olympics,” which criticized contemporary feminists, so-called “social justice warriors” and video game news sites. On September 25th, Gawker[11] published an article titled “The Privilege Tournament,” which invited readers to cast their votes for who would be considered the most privileged group. On September 26th, the philosophy blog Critical Theory[10] published post mocking the Gawker article for being an example of the oppression olympics.



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  • 10/27/14--12:39: A Potato Flew Around My Room
  • About

    “A Potato Flew Around My Room” is a misheard lyric from Frank Ocean’s 2012 R&B song “Thinkin’ Bout You” that became a popular subject of online mockeries on Vine after it was first said by Viner pg bree in a video clip he uploaded in October 2014.

    Origin

    On October 14th, 2014, Viner pg bree uploaded a video of himself singing a lyric from the song “Thinkin Bout You,” in which he mistakenly sings the word “tornado” as “potato” (shown below). In the first two weeks, the video gained nearly 10 million views, more than 169,000 likes and 147,000 revines.



    “A potato flew around before you came excuse the…”

    Spread

    On October 18th, Viner lil syd from the trap[2] uploaded a video of a potato tied to a spinning ceiling fan and accompanied by the audio track from pg bree’s original video, which garnered upwards of 150,000 likes and 144,000 revines in nine days (shown below, left). On October 23rd, Viner KingJone$[3] uploaded a video clip of Frank Ocean singing “Thinkin Bout You” with pg bree’s cover rendition dubbed over the original track (shown below, right).



    On October 24th, the AlotVines YouTube channel uploaded a compilation of “Potato Flew Around My Room” remix videos (shown below, left). The following day, the channel uploaded a second compilation (shown below, right).



    On October 26th, Tumblr user condom[1] submitted a post containing the phrase “A potato flew around my room before you came,” which accumulated more than 230 notes in the first 24 hours.

    Notable Examples

    As of late October 2014, there are more than 1,400 videos associated with the phrase “a potato flew around” on Vine.[4]



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