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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 12/12/14--20:07: Oddworld
  • (This article is a W.I.P.)


    About

    Oddworld (known as: Oddworld Inhabitants) is a video game company in the 1995 which was been created by Lorne Lanning and Sherry McKenna[1]. After when the PlayStation video game Oddworld Abe’s Oddysee[2] is gave a highly positive reviews from the critics and gamers.

    History

    W.I.P.

    Premise

    Abe’s Oddysee

    W.I.P.

    Abe’s Exoddus

    W.I.P.

    Munch’s Oddysee

    W.I.P.

    Stranger’s Wrath

    W.I.P.

    Spread

    W.I.P.

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Oddworld

    [2]Wikipedia – Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee


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  • 12/12/14--21:51: Satirical Hip Hop / Meme Rap
  • About

    Satirical Hip Hop (often referred to as Ironic rap or Meme Rap) refers to a sub genre of hip hop that is created with the intention of becoming viral, normally as a joke and/or a parody of prominent genres such as Gangsta rap[1] and trap music[2]. The satirical nature of an ironic rap song is often intentionally left out of its title, cover image, and description, in order to catch listeners by surprise. Meme rap typically features lo-fi cloudy production, simplistic music videos, lazy rhymes, and intentionally stereotypical lyrics, with humor as the goal.

    Origin

    Although satirical hip hop music was made with no serious intent or for the purposes of parodying the gangsta genre in the 90´s, meme rap only became mainstream with the success of American rapper Lil B with his single “Wonton Soup” (shown below) released on August 11th, 2010.



    The video has received over 12 million views, 50k likes, and 54k comments as of December 2014. it is worth nothing that it also has 30k dislikes, likely due to the stealthiness of its parodistic nature.

    The song features lines that would be considered stereotypical of the hip hop genre, as well as poor rhymes and a lazy flow.[9] The style has become the defining characteristic of Lil B’s body of work as well as meme rap in general.

    Spread

    After the success of Lil B, many other artists began taking on the same lo-fi self-parodying style of music, one of them being Arizona rapper Yung Lean, who with his associates (named SADBOYS) would become popular after the release of their mixtape Unknown Death 2002 and the release of the single “Hurt” featuring multiple 90´s products and references, as well as 98´s windows screensavers.



    The song features the same sloppy delivery that Lil B is famous for.

    On Sep 24, 2011, Tyler The Creator,[4] under the moniker “Young Nigga”, released a song named “Come Through Looking Clean”[6] which was a parody of mainstream hip hop music. The song draws heavy inspiration from Lil B’s music, who is said to be one of Tyler´s favorite artists.

    After a few years the term “Meme Rap” was used as a term to insult rap music and artists; this use was heavy on the 4chan board /mu/ due to the constant spamming of said artists. The term has since become popular outside of the board and is now constantly used to attack popular underground artists.



    The hate was normally presented on “essential charts” common on the board. The charts typically featured rappers and albums that were popular on the board, despite not intentionally making music that would be considered ironic.



    Youtube has created a playlist titled “meme rap” featuring an assortment of satirical rappers.[10] The satirical site Encyclopedia Dramatica includes an article on Ironic Rap.[11] Other popular meme rappers include Riff Raff,[3] Die Antwoord,[5] Das Racist,[12] Lil Ugly Mane, and Viper the Rapper.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 12/13/14--11:26: 9+10=21
  • About

    9+10=21 is the wrong answer to a math problem that was posted on Vine and quickly became a fad within the Vine community, later spreading to various other internet communities.

    Origin

    The first Vine was uploaded around July 2014 by an unknown Viner. The content of the Vine features a man talking to a little boy saying he’s stupid. The boy replies that he isn’t, then the man asks him “what’s 9+10?”, and the kid answers “21”. The man then reaffirms his statement by saying “you stupid.”

    Although the original Vine was lost, the video was uploaded to YouTube on July 7th, 2014, by Alondra Morelos[1] (seen below), and then again on July 9th by YouTuber Shadow Subscribe.[2]



    By December 14, 2014, Morelos’ upload had received 5.7 million views and 37,000 likes, and Shadow’s upload had received 3.7 million views and 28,000 likes.

    Spread

    The original vine was then re-uploaded to vine by Ridiculous Vines on August 17, 2014,[3] (seen below) after the original was lost. As of December 2014, the vine has gained 3.38 million loops, 79.8 thousand likes, and 66.6 thousand revines.



    Later, on August 29th, YouTube user SwiftStar352 uploaded[4] a song featuring audio from the vine (seen below). The song reached 14.6 million views and 108,000 likes by December 2014.



    The Vine then went viral and by September became the subject of multiple parodies and other vine recreations.

    Notable Examples

    Other Vines



    Other Videos



    Images


       

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/13/14--12:09: Kaamelott
  • About

    Kaamelott is a French fantasy tv series that ran from 2005 to 2009, spawned comic books, a movie trilogy in the making as well as a cult following among French netizens and it helped launch the career of Alexandre Astier as stand-up comedian, director, actor and composer.

    History

    Kaamelott is a tv series created by Alexandre Astier, that is composed of short episodes (from 3 minutes to about 7 minutes for the latter seasons except the 6th season) that were broadcast on M6 tv channel on prime time from January 2005 to October 2009, for a total of 6 seasons. This short format was inspired by another popular French tv show from the same channel, Caméra Café, which was a sitcom about employees in an office space filmed from the point of views of a coffee machine during coffee breaks.
    The plot centers upon King Arthur (Alexandre Astier) and his assembly of incompetent but loyal knights in his fortress of Camelot, experiencing everyday life and epic adventures during the fall of the Roman Empire, the Barbarian invasion and the quest for the Holy Grail. The show loosely follows the traditional medieval tales of the Arthurian mythology and the Round Table with modern humor and dialogue.
    While the first seasons were about individual humoristic episodes that didn’t follow any order, a more dramatic story was introduced starting in season 4 featuring a more serious tone in the conflict between King Arthur and Lancelot, his resignation as a king and how chaos ensued. The sixth season broke with the usual format by introducing a miniseries of 40-minute long episodes acting as a prequel to the original series.

    Cult following

    An archived news article from 2005[1] about the series accounted for its immediate popularity among the public, stating that more than 3.9 million viewers were already enjoying the first season every evening, surpassing Caméra Café in views. According to the “Wikipedia”: article on the show, it attracted more viewer each season, reaching a record of 5 million views for some episodes[2].
    This increasing popularity translated into the creation of many fan-made websites and forums[3][4], especially for creating “fanfictions”: and art. Another fan website was also made as a wide encyclopedia on the show[5].
    In addition to the tv series, an ongoing series of comic books were issued starting in 2006 and, as of December 2014, are composed of 7 chapters[6].
    With initial tv series ending in 2009, Alexandre Astier stated that he wanted to make a full feature film as a sequel. In a article from French news site 20 minutes released on October 20th 2014, it is learnt that it is going to be a trilogy and that he is still negociating to start shooting[7].

    Fan Arts



    Memes

    C’est pas faux

    C’est pas faux (roughly meaning You have a point in English) is a catchphrase meant as a filler retort when replying to someone. While already existing as an idiom in French, the series popularized it through character Perceval who is presented as a not-really-bright illiterate, in episode 28th from the first season, aired on January 20th 2005 (an extract from it is shown below).

    !

    Perceval learnt the catchphrase from another not-very-smart character on the show, Karadoc as a way of replying to someone who talked to him using complex words without making a fool out of himself. The entire episode shows him comically trying to use it when speaking with various other characters.
    The French internet quickly embraced it as a catchphrase.



    External References


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  • 12/13/14--23:57: Tarot
  • About

    Tarot cards are historic playing cards that emerged from the 15th Century. Online, the major ‘arcana’ that appear in the original deck are often drawn by artists in their own style. In fandoms, characters are often attributed to the major arcana that befits their roles and personalities.

    Origin

    [W.I.P]
    Tarot cards (more formally known as the tarot,) are a pack of playing cards that originated from 15th Century Europe. Initially they were used merely as playing cards for gambling, but by the 18th century until the present they have become a means of fortune telling as well as a map of mental and spiritual pathways[1].

    Spread

    [W.I.P]
    While Tarot cards have been around for centuries, the attribution of characters to the major arcana of the tarot is popularized by the video game series Shin Megami Tensei: Persona, which utilizes the numerous arcana of the tarot in its gameplay and characters.

    Notable Examples

    [W.I.P.]

    Search Interests

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Tarot


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  • 12/14/14--02:11: Bite the Pillow
  • WORK IN PROGRESS


    About

    “Bite the Pillow, I’m Going in Dry” is an online expression that is often paired with images of menacing-looking people, animals, and characters. It is similar to, and is often used interchangeably with, memetic expressions such as Prepare Your Anus and You Gonna Get Raped.

    Origin

    [W.I.P.]

    Spread

    [W.I.P.]

    Notable Examples

    [W.I.P.]



    Search Interest


    External References

    [W.I.P.]


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  • 12/14/14--09:47: Finals Reactions
  • About

    Finals Reactions refers to a series of images depicting online reactions to college finals week, such images often show feelings of desperation, stress, extreme despair and/or carefree behavior.

    Origin

    W.I.P

    Spread

    On May 22, 2012 youtuber LifeAccordingToJimmy posted a video titled “Finals Week” (shown below), the video has received 2,161,227 views and 15,504 likes

    On April 22, 2013 youtuber FenCheeks posted a video depicting the average behaviour during finals, the video has received 15,504 views and 476 likes.

    Notable Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


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    About

    Drop the cane is a viral video of an elderly man dropping his walking sticks to the ground before overjoyfully dancing. The video was then remixed with various music tracks to fit the man’s ecstatic moves.

    Origin

    On July 18th, 2014, Facebook user Edgard Eleuterio Daza posted a 3-minute long video to his wall titled “Eternamente joven”, which is Spanish for “Forever young”. A Youtube upload from July 21th can be found below.

    It features an elderly man with walking sticks in the middle of a ball, surrounded by middle-aged couples dancing around him to the tune of Bill Haley’s “Rock around the clock”. The man then suddenly drops his sticks and goes on an happy solo dancing before inviting two women to dance with him. As of December 2014, the Facebook post was shared more than 1 850 000 times and reached over 163 000 likes.

    Spread

    As several reuploads of the video were made on Youtube, each one gaining their fair amounts of views, new sites such as Time[2], Daily Mail[3] or even Buzzfeed[4] sarted reporting on the viral phenomenon as early as July 21th and onward, often commenting on its funny and heartwarming nature.

    Remixes

    On July 20th, Youtube user Klaypex uploaded a cut version of the video with remixed music in order to promote his song #shutyourtrap (shown below).

    As of December 2014, the video has gained more than 2 100 000 views.
    While it’s not clear if it was a direct influence, more people joined in to create their own video remixes featuring the dancing old man.



    External References

    [1]Facebook – Eternamente joven

    [2]Time – This Video of an Old Man Dancing Will Brighten Your Day

    [3]Daily Mail – From old-folk to old rock! Elderly man shocks fellow wedding guests by throwing down his canes and taking over the dance floor with his nifty moves

    [4]Buzzfeed – Watch This Awesome Old Man Throw Away His Crutches And Dance


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  • 12/14/14--19:22: 2014 Sydney Cafe Siege
  • Editor’s note: this event is currently developing. The entry may not be fully complete for quite some time as a result. If you have any helpful information, feel free to contribute.


    About

    As of 15th of December, 2014, a Lindt Chocolate Cafe in Sydney, containing (according to varying reports) between eight and several dozen people, has been held hostage by “at least one” (according to police) shotgun-wielding Islamic militant. It is unknown if the gunman is in possession of explosives at the moment.

    Background

    The Lindt Chocolate Cafe in question is located at 53 Martin Place, Sydney, Australia. According to eyewitness reports,[1] the gunman was nearby the cafe at approximately 9:47am, carrying a “a blue sports bag” with what appeared to be a gun inside.

    It is currently unknown what the gunman’s motives are, although police have asserted that contact has been established.[2]

    Canadian PM Stephen Harper has tweeted his support for the hostages, and it has been reported that US President Barack Obama is currently being briefed on the situation.[1]

    Timeline

    (researching)

    Notable Developments

    #sydneysiege

    On Facebook[3] and Twitter,[4] the hashtag“#sydneysiege” went trending worldwide within hours of the events unfolding. A Reddit live thread[5] was created which had more than 17,000 viewers at peak. A post was also made to /r/worldnews[6] which gathered more than 8,200 comments and 4,800 upvotes within 6 hours, making it reach the front page of Reddit.

    Notable Images



    Search insight

    Currently unavailable.

    External References


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  • 12/14/14--21:23: H.P. Lovecraft
  • About

    Howard Philips Lovecraft was a Science-fiction/Horror author who hailed from Providence, Rhode Island. He is known primarily for his cosmicist stories in which the protagonists are often tormented by visions and interactions with beings beyond the scope human understanding.
    While he was only truly recognized posthumously, he changed the course of horror fiction. In the words of Stephen King:

    Lovecraft. . . opened the way for me as he had done for others before me…. it is his shadow, so long and gaunt, and his eyes, so dark and puritanical, which overlie almost all of the important horror fiction that has come since.

    People have since continued parodying, deconstructing and reconstructing the Lovecraftian mythos.

    Notable Memes and Creations

    Cthulhu

    Cthulhu is a fictional monster created by horror writer H.P. Lovecraft that is often depicted as a large cephalopod-like creature with a tentacled mouth, large wings, clawed hands and scaly skin.[1]

    Nyarlathotep

    Nyarlathotep was first introduced in the short story of the same name[2] and is another reoccurring being in Lovecraftian fiction. While it is not as popular as Cthulhu-- perhaps due to its inconsistent form ranging from a pharaoh to a tangled mess of tentacles-- it still has its place in modern popular culture. Notably, “Haiyore! Nyaruko-san” is a novel and anime series wherein Nyarlathotep takes the form of a silver-haired Japanese school girl.



    Azathoth

    On H.P. Lovecraft romans, it is described as a god of chaos, which is existed before the creation of the universe and has infinitive amount of powers until its body has sepparated itself from the Nyarlathotep.[3]

    Controversy

    While Lovecraft is revered as a writer, he was also highly xenophobic and antisemitic-- supporting organisations like the KKK.[4] Because of this, his name often sparks discussions regarding “separating the art from the artist”.

    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Cthulhu

    [2]Dagonbytes – Nyarlathotep

    [3]The H.P. Lovecraft Wiki – Azathoth

    [4]TV Tropes – H.P. Lovecraft


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  • 12/15/14--11:19: #Metalgate
  • About

    #Metalgate is a Twitter hashtag campaign deriving from the GamerGate controversy as a way of protesting against stereotypes surrounding the metal culture and being portrayed as having conservative ideas by Social Justice Bloggers. Since its inception, boosted by GamerGate supporters, articles were made to comment on this new movement’s legitimacy.

    Origin

    On December 12th, 2014, Death Metal Underground writer Cory Van der Pol issued an article titled #metalgate[1] which dealt with the coming of a new hashtag campaign on Twitter[2], launched by GamerGate supporters but targetting Metal culture, asserting that it started following a peculiar extract from an article by Spin about the twenty best metal albums of 2014[3] (shown below).

    Metal is still dogged by the issues that arise from its deep-seated conservative values, but thanks to an increase in conversations about racism, politics, and feminism, those on the right side of history have gained solid ground.

    The Death Metal Underground article offers an opinion piece on the current state of Metal culture, also quoting a Washington Post article from 2006[4] which is asserted to have been reused by activists to justify their new movement.

    Spread

    The next day, Youtuber and GamerGate activist Sargon of Akkad uploaded a video in favor of this new trend (shown below), analyzing different articles including the Spin and Washington Post ones but others as well such as an opinion piece from Metal Injection commenting on the increasing use of the slur “faggot” among metalhead communities[5].

    The video has gathered more than 40 000 views in two days. A sub-reddit was created and subsequently banned before another one, Metal Ghazi, took its place[10].
    As the trend garnered more and more tweets online, several articles were made commenting on whether the movement is a legitimate one or not, addresing its links with GamerGate. Some are in favor of the initiative, such as Servile Insurrection[6] or Return of Kings[7] while others like Medium[8] or Metal-related website Metal Sucks[9], not so.

    External References


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  • 12/15/14--12:05: amiibo
  • Work in progress, images to be added as soon as i can get them in the galleries

    amiibo are figurines produced by Nintendo to be used in conjunction with specific video games, most notably Super Smash Bros. for 3DS and Wii U.[1] Since their unveil at E3 in 2014, the toys have developed an online following.

    History

    On June 10, 2014, during Nintendo’s Digital Event at E3 that year, amiibos were unveiled as figurines that would use near-field communications (NFC) to interact with and unlock content in specific games, such as the then-to-be-released Super Smash Bros. for 3DS and Wii U. The first wave of twelve amiibo were released on November 21, 2014, and a second wave of five new models was released in December 2014. A third wave was announced in November 2014, slated for release in North America in February 2015. [2]

    Fandom

    The same day amiibo were revealed, the subreddit /r/amiibo was created as a discussion place for the figurines. [3]

    wip

    Notable Events

    Prototypes Vs. Finals

    A huge uproar rose online about the quality of amiibos when released in comparison with the planned prototypes and was mentioned by gaming websites such as Kotaku.[11] Marth and Link’s amiibos received the overall most backlash for looking significantly poorer in quality on release than people were led to believe from pre-release pictures.



    Factory Defects

    Soon after the first wave of amiibo were released, several customers reported finding defective amiibo. On Novemebr 22, 2014, Reddit user Adamantium126 shared an image on /r/gaming of a Samus Aran amiibo which had two arm cannons, which was later auctioned off on eBay for $2,500. [4][5] Similarly, in December 2014, a legless Princess Peach amiibo was auctioned off at $25,100. These events were reported by several gaming news sites, such as GameSpot and Kotaku. [7][8]


    Custom amiibo

    Also after the first wave of amiibo were released, several hobbyists customized their figures and posted them online. In 2014, a website dedicated to custom amiibos was created, alongside a Tumblr page. [9][10]wip wip wip!




    Google Search Interest

    References


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  • 12/15/14--12:44: Clickbait
  • [Work in progress]

    About

    “Clickbait” is an Internet slang term for viral content and sensational headlines produced by websites for the sole purpose of accumulating pageviews in order to generate advertising revenue. It is often used as a pejorative for content that spreads through social networking sites and lacks depth, quality, authenticity or accuracy.

    Origin

    [Researching]

    Spread

    [Researching]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/15/14--12:53: The Joker
  • About

    The Joker is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. He is the arch-nemesis of Batman and other heroes. He has rose to popularity since his appearance in the 2008 film The Dark Knight where he was played by actor Heath Ledger. He is a highly acclaimed character, ranking as the 2nd best comic book villan by IGN.

    Origin

    [Work in Progress]

    Spread

    [Work in Progress]

    Sub-Memes

    [Work in Progress]


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  • 12/15/14--14:43: Put Em in a Coffin
  • About

    Put Em in a Coffin is series of Vines in which a person crosses their arms and jumps on an object, usually on another person, or a hood of a car.

    Origin

    The trend begun when VonMar, a member of the rap group ThotBoyz posted a number of vines featuring the move in late May, one of them receiving the most popularity, posted on June 11, 2014 (shown below), it then began to trend, the vine has achieved 2,814,919 loops, 62.3K Likes, 62.1K Revines and 4,060 Comments, becoming the most popular up to date.



    Spread

    On June 12, 2014 vine user Matthew Espinosa 2 uploaded a vine of him saying “put em in a coffin” before jumping on a table full of people, the video has gained 2,872,102 loops, 127.8K Likes, 49.7K Revines and 3,258 Comments.



    In the next months, multiple vines started appearing featuring people shouting “Put em in a coffin” before jumping on different objects including cars.

    On June 10, 2014 YouTube user OMGVines posted a video compilation including vines of the fad.



    Notable Examples

    Search Interest


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  • 12/15/14--15:22: Trigger
  • About

    Triggers is a term used online to indicate situations and phrases that set people off (known as Triggering). Although initially made popular through the Social Justice blogging sphere, the term gained most of its popularity through ironic usage by mocking groups that use the term over things that are usually considered to be trivial or irrelevant.

    Origin

    The word originated from the psychological phrase “trauma trigger,”[1] or something that causes a traumatic past event to come back into memory clearly, which are usually known as episodes. The term is known to be related to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD),[2] a disorder that can develop after a person is exposed to one or more traumatic events, indicated through symptoms such as disturbing recurring flashbacks.

    Spread

    The phrase became notorious mostly on the social media website Tumblr for over-use and twisting of the original definition in reference to being “triggered” over things that are usually considered to be trivial or common first world problems. In April 2014, Washington resident Melody Hensley (shown below) claimed that cyberbullies on Twitter caused her to get PTSD. The story was subsequently covered by various news outlets, such as the Dailydot,[3] the Daily Mail,[4] Fashion Times[5] and Fox;[6] while Hensley’s claims were mostly met with skepticism.



    In the popular online webcomic Homestuck, the character Kankri Vantas[7] often uses the term, which was inspired by Tumblr as confirmed by Homestuck author Andrew Hussie.[8]



    Criticism

    Triggered has come to be noticed by the internet usually mostly through its intense criticism[9] and the surplus of satire directed at the word. The arguments usually center around whether one can really be triggered online and where the line should be crossed on being offended or medically triggered. In December 2014, 4chan’s /pol/ board was updated to add a scrolling “[Trigger Warning]” text on all post. The addition was meant to sarcastically portray that all post on /pol/ are potentially a “trigger” as the content of the board is usually controversial.



    Search Interest


    External References


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  • 12/16/14--03:06: Booker, catch!
  • “Booker, catch!” is a phrase said by the character Elizabeth throughout the 2013 video game BioShock Infinite.

    The game takes place in 1912, in an alternate time period in which the South American city of Columbia is now floating in the sky as part of the United States. In the game, the player takes control of Booker DeWitt, a private detective from New York who’s gambling habits have caught up to him, so in order to pay back his debt collectors, he must travel to Columbia and find a girl named Elizabeth and bring her back unharmed. However, Zachary Hale Comstock, the city’s ruler, believes Elizabeth to be part of a large prophecy, with Booker being named the ‘False Shepard’ and Elizabeth being named ‘the Lamb of Columbia’, referencing the fact that he wants to escape the city with her to pay off his debt. Comstock sends his followers, known as the Founders to kill the False Shepard and bring the Lamb back, so in order to make it out alive, Booker and Elizabeth team up to escape the city and get to New York.

    Throughout the game, Elizabeth can assist Booker in gunfights by bringing in objects such as medical supplies or turrets from alternate worlds through ‘tears’ in their reality. This meme branches off from her assistance, as she can also find medical supplies and ammo to throw to Booker, in which she will alert the player by saying she’s found something, with phrases such as “Ammo! Take it!” or “You’re bleeding!”, with the most common saying being “Booker, catch!”. Because the phrase is mentioned many times throughout the game, it has become a inside joke amongst BioShock fans along the lines of “Would you kindly” or the Andrew Ryan speech from the first game.


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  • 12/16/14--11:58: Cory in the House
  • Very Work In Progress. Feel free to request editorship

    About

    Cory in the House is television series which aired from January 12th, 2007 to September 13, 2008 as a spin-off from the Disney show That’s So Raven.[1]

    origin

    Cory in the House gained popularity on the 4chan board /v/ after the release of the DS videogame, it was constantly used as a way of trolling whenever the leak of a new game was asked, also as a ironic response in “favorite videogame” threads.

    Spread

    It wasnt until the board /v/ raided the site Gamefaqs to make Cory in The House DS the most wanted FAQ on the site[2] on late december of 2013, and the raid to the site Metacritics[3] in order to give the game a high score, that the game,and the show will skyrocket in popularity outside of the board.

    Related Memes

    Cory, you a busta

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 12/16/14--12:06: Trap Music
  • About

    Trap music is a rhythm music genre mostly being known as a complimation of background hip hop pump-up tracks. It has been originated in the early 1990s United States. It is recognised with powerful kicks, snaps or simply rhythm instruments.
    As an online subculture this music genre has gained attention with various catchphases, Turn Down For What soundtrack and Montage Parody subculture.

    History

    In early 1980, programmable drum machines (for example Roland TR-808) were came out and used as a drum base on rap genre.[1] As a different rhythm source, drum machines provided different compose of the background hitats, kicks and drums; portrayed more powerful bass and dance concept.

    Reception

    Related Memes

    Damn Son! Where’d You Find This?

    Damn son! Where’d you find this? Is a popular sound sample or trap music drop used very often on trap musics.[2] The origin sample has been voiced by the 42 year old music producer Shadoehaze[3].

    On Feb 6, 2013; the producer Shadoehaze uploaded an introduction video to brief more information behind the popular sound sample made by himself. On Dec 27, 2013 the website Vice has published an article detailing other infos about the Shadoehaze. On Sep 10, 2014 youtuber Nyanners published a rap cover “I am ur leader” featuring the sample at the beginning.

    Real Trap Shit

    Turn Down For What?

    Airhorn

    Search Interest

    References

    [1]RunTheTrap – What is trap music

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Damn Son

    [3]Soundcloud – Shadoehaze

    [4]Vice – I found the DSHDYFT Guy


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    About

    The phrase “Bitch you guessed it!” is a lyric taken from the rap song “U Guessed It” by rapper OG Maco. It is often used as an aggressive response to a person that gave a random answer that was correct. Often it is followed by a following lyric “You was right!” which is said in a less aggressive manner. The lyrics became famous among the Vine community due to it’s bi-polar nature and later spread out into various areas on the internet.

    Origin

    The song “U Guessed It” by OG Maco had it’s video released on August 28, 2014 [1], where it has currently gained over 15 million views.



    Vine Origin

    One of the earliest examples of the song’s use on Vine was the Vine titled “The Excited Bipolar Teacher” by viner Reggie COUZ, which was uploaded on September 10, 2014 [2].



    Impact

    In mid-September, the phrase took off greatly and several other Vines started to use the sample of the song.

    Other Vines



    Youtube Vine Compilation



    Image Examples



    Search Interest



    External Reference

    [1]Youtube – OG Maco – U Guessed It

    [2]Vine – The excited bipolar teacher


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