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New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

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  • 04/07/14--17:03: heartgender
  • i am magical millie and i am the pokemon master assemble


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  • 04/07/14--17:09: Good Girl Ginger
  • Not all gingers are bad, some don’t steal souls! I’m here to prove it.


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  • 04/07/14--19:05: Phoenix Games
  • History

    Phoenix Games, known as Phoenix Games Ltd. in England, Phoenix Games B.V. in the Netherlands, Phoenix Games Asia in Thailand, and collectively as Phoenix Games Group, is a defunct game developer, and publisher of cheap franchise spinoffs. Self termed a “Super Budget Publisher,” Phoenix Games’ business model was to produce as many low quality, easy to produce games as possible. Most of the games are rated 3+ by PEGI, which probably was to the benefit of their target demographic: everyone. It was active between 2003 and 2009 and sold to markets globally. The remnants of its website, which include its list of games, are available at archive.org.

    Games by Phoenix Games were often produced as mini-game collections. They typically included card games, arcade games, jigsaw puzzles, and others. Phoenix Games also often made games with titles and themes similar to Disney franchises, but were able to get around copyright infringement by making them odd. In addition, they would port the games to other consoles with the same features, and create “sequels” for newer consoles (e.g. Iron Chef for the PS2 had a “sequel” called Iron Chef II on the Wii).

    List of Video Games

    • Dalmatians 3 (Rip-off of 101 Dalmatians)

    • Paccie (Rip-off of Pac-Man)

    • Dinosaur Adventure (Rip-off of The Land Before Time)

    • Snow White and the 7 Clever Boys (Rip-off of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)

    • Street Warrior (Rip-off of Street Fighter)

    • Hamster Ball (Rip-off of Monkey Ball)

    • Maniac Mole

    • Cartoon Kingdom

    • Legend of Herkules (Rip-off of Hercules)

    • White Van Racer

    • Crabby Adventure

    • Dalmatians 4 (Only for the Wii)

    • Peter Pan (Rip-off of Disney Animation Peter Pan)

    • Mighty Mulan (Rip-off of Mulan)

    • Son of the Lion King (Rip-off of The Lion King)

    • Kidz Sports Basketball

    • Animal Soccer World (Rip-off of Bedknobs and Broomsticks)

    • Arcade 3D Games Action

    • Wii Version: Adventures of Pinocchio. PS2 Version: Pinocchio (Rip-off of Pinocchio)

    • Veggy World

    • Wacky Zoogp (Rip-off of Mario Kart Series)

    • Cinderella (Rip-off of Cinderella)

    Reception

    The Phoenix Games is have a Negative Reviews that Phoenix Games is Rip-off at the Famous and Popular Film’s, TV Shows and Video Games. That Phoenix Games Animation is kinda like the infamous Zelda CD-i Games, Hotel Mario and Sega CD.


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  • 04/07/14--19:15: Sandor Clegane Loves Chicken
  • [This article is under construction, entry editors wanted.]



    Sandor Clegane loves chicken is a series of image macros and parodies featuring the character Sandor Clegane from Game of Thrones in situations involving or mentioning chicken.


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  • 04/08/14--09:18: Book Spine Poetry
  • About

    Book Spine Poetry is a photo meme that involves lining up or stacking books in a particular order so the titles on the book spines create a poem. The idea originated from a photo project created by artist Nina Katchadourian.

    Origin

    In 1993 artist Nina Katchadourian[2] began a photography project titled “Sorted Books”[1] that involved stacking books in a particular order in order to create a sentence or story. A collection of her sorted book photographs, titled Sorted Books,[3] was published by Chronicle Books on March 5th, 2013. The concept was first adapted to poetry in a post on an arts and crafts blog called buildmakecraftbake[4] titled “Book Spine Poetry” published on February 11th, 2009.



    Spread

    Katchadourian’s project was highlighted on Boing Boing[6] on September 25th, 2008. After buildmakecraftbake introduced the concept of book spine poetry in 2009 blogs began creating their own book spine poems and calling for photos of their readers’ book spine poetry. On March 5th, 2010, School Library Journal[7] published a post titled “Poetry Friday: Spiny” which introduced the concept of book spine poetry and asked users to e-mail photos of their poems. The user submissions[8] were published on the site on March 12th. Collecting and posting reader submissions became an annual tradition, with lists published in 2011[11], 2012[12], and 2013.[13]



    The meme was covered by more popular sites in 2012, beginning with Maria Popova’s Book Spine Poetry series on her blog Brain Pickings[8], which published its first installment on April 16th, 2012. On April 20th, the Tumblr blog BookSpinePoetry[15] was created. On July 31st, 2012, The Huffington Post[9] covered the photo meme, and on October 28th, 2012, Book Riot[10] published “The Best of Book Spine Poetry.”

    Book spine poetry became popular on Tumblr using the tag #bookspinepoetry[5] through book publishers and library blogs which would encourage their patrons to create and post photos of their poems, such as Sullivan University Lexington Library[14] and Harper Perennial.[16]

    The meme was revisited around the release of Katchadourian book in March 2013, with Flavorwire[17] profiling the book and meme on March 11th and io9[18] publishing a post on them on May 19th.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 04/08/14--10:49: Valeria Lukyanova
  • About

    Valeria Lukyanova is a Moldavian-Ukrainian model who has been nicknamed the “human Barbie” for her pursuit of a doll-like appearance through heavy use of makeup and plastic surgery.

    Online History

    On February 22nd, 2008, Lukyanova began uploading short monologue videos via her YouTube[10] channel. In the next six years, the channel garnered upwards of 31 million video views and 63,000 subscribers. On September 26th, 2010, Lukyanova launched her personal Facebook[2] page, gathering over 35,000 followers over the next four years.

    No Lenses, No Makeup

    On April 7th, 2012, Lukyanova broke out into international fame after she uploaded a video titled “no lenses, no makeup” in which she shows her face at a close-up range purportedly without wearing any makeup (shown below). The video quickly went viral across the Russian social networking site VK, as well as on the English-speaking web, amassing upwards of 2.9 million views and 2,100 comments within two years. As of April 2014, Lukyanova’s Twitter feed has accumulated over 13,300 followers.



    Feud With “Real Life Ken”

    On November 1st, 2012, The Huffington Post[6] reported that American entrepreneur Justin Jedlica (a.k.a. “human Ken doll”) criticized Lukyanova for using makeup rather than cosmetic surgeries to achieve her doll-like appearance. On January 31st, 2013, Lukyanova and Jedlica met for the first time in an episode of the news program Inside Edition (shown below).



    GQ Interview

    On April 7th, 2014, the men’s interest magazine GQ[3] published an interview with Lukyanova, in which she claimed “race-mixing” was responsible for the rise in cosmetic surgery procedures in the Western world. She also revealed that she was “against feminism” and that the idea of marriage and children made her feel “revulsion.”

    Human Dolls

    Lukyanova is often photographed with models Dominika Kjosa[4] (shown below, left) and Anastasia Shpagina[8] known as the “Human Anime Girl” (shown below, right). On August 31st, 2012, a Facebook[9] page titled “Human Dolls” was launched, featuring photographs of models wearing makeup and outfits resembling Lukyanova’s “living doll” aesthetic.



    Reputation

    On April 22nd, 2012, the Taiwanese Animators, (formerly known as Next Media Animations) uploaded a video mocking Lukyanova’s cosmetic surgery and rising fame on the Internet (shown below, left). That same day, the women’s interest blog Jezebel[11] published an article about Lukyanova, speculating that many of the model’s photographs had been photoshopped. On November 13th, YouTuber VegetarianChuck uploaded a video featuring a series of photographs showing Lukyanova before and after her purported cosmetic surgeries (shown below). In two years, the videos garnered more than 5.8 million and 1.48 million views respectively.



    On December 28th, 2013, VICE released a documentary about Lukyanova titled “Space Barbie,” in which she claims to be a spiritual guru named “Amatue” who wishes to enlighten the world with her physical beauty (shown below). She goes on to reveal that she experienced many encounters with spiritual beings as a teenager and that she lived previous lives on other planets.



    On February 28th, 2014, Redditor lexyjayla submitted a photo of Lukyanova to the /r/WTF[5] subreddit, where it received upwards of 7,600 up votes and 700 comments in the first month (shown below).



    Barbie Syndrome

    “Barbie Syndrome” refers to the pursuit of the body proportions and general appearance of the Barbie brand of fashion dolls.[13]

    Personal Life

    Lukyanova was born on August 23rd, 1985 in Tiraspol, Moldavian SSR of the former Soviet Union. She later moved to Odessa, Ukraine and married Ukrainian entrepreneur Dmitry Shkrabov. In February 2014, Lukyanova claimed she would attempt the dietary practice breatharianism,[12] which involves subsisting on light and air without any food or water.[1]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/08/14--11:30: Ojamajo Carnival!!
  • About

    “Ojamajo Carnival!!” (Japanese: おジャ魔女カーニバル!!) is the opening theme song for the 1999 Japanese anime series Ojamajo DoReMi. Online, the song has become a popular musical resource for MAD remix videos on Nico Nico Douga since late-2008.

    Origin

    The magical girl anime Ojamajo DoReMi[1] was produced by Toei Animations and premiered on Japanese TV stations on February 7th, 1999. The show’s opening theme was written by future K-On! lyricist Shoko Omori[2], and performed by MAHO-Dou (MAHO堂), a group consisting of the show’s voice actresses Chiemi Chiba, Tomoko Akiya, and Yuki Matsuoka. The song would be released as a single under the now-defunct label Bandai Music Entertainment on March 5th, 1999.



    The well-crafted song would receive immediate praise after its release, where it would later be given the award for Best Theme Song at Animation Kobe[3] during 1999.

    Spread

    This song began being used as musical resource on Niconico as early as the site’s relaunch on March 2007 with an AMV-style video of the anime s-CRY-ed[4]. One of the first mash-ups with the song was a dubbed remix of the music video for MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This” (shown below), where it only received a moderated 72,000 views since its March 25th upload.


    【ニコニコ動画】MCハマーでおジャ魔女どれみ

    From there, videos featuring the song started appearing at a steady pace, often time relating to THE iDOLM@STER, after an iM@S music video of the song was uploaded to the site[5] on April 22nd, 2007. The song would remain mildly-known until over a year later, when it was used in a dub mash-up with the viral video “”http:" />Crazy Frog Brothers", created by user Frisk and uploaded to Niconico on October 25th, 2008.


    【ニコニコ動画】おジャ魔女ゲイツ

    Titled “Ojamajo Gates”, the song’s near perfect sync with the boys’ awkward dancing and lip-syncing helped it to become an immediate hit with users, reaching the top of the site’s video rankings chart and being viewed more then 2.5 million times. Inspired, users began trying their hand in recreating the video and before long, MAD remixes of the song soon cropped up, with them gaining some fair success. Over 480 videos relating to the song has since been uploaded to Niconico[6], with many being MAD videos breaking the hundred-thousand views mark.

    Notable Examples


    【ニコニコ動画】ディオ魔ジョカーニバル!!【ニコニコ動画】おジュ魔女いずみ
    Left: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure | Right: Chargeman Ken!
    【ニコニコ動画】おジャ魔女イーノック 【エルシャダイ】【ニコニコ動画】クソ魔女せろり
    Left: El Shaddai | Right: A Certain Magical Index
    【ニコニコ動画】【MAD】巨人カーニバル!!【進撃の巨人】【ニコニコ動画】【コマンドー】 おジャ魔女ベネット
    Left: Attack on Titan | Right: Commando

    Search Interest

    External References

    Editor’s Note: Registration is needed to browse the original videos listed in this section.

    [1]Wikipedia – Ojamajo Doremi

    [2]Wikipedia – Shoko Omori (Japanese)

    [3]Wikipedia – Animation Kobe | Animation Kobe Theme Song Award

    [4]Nico Nico Douga – 【スクライド】 ジャ魔ライド 【MAD】 / Posted on 03-07-2007

    [5]Nico Nico Douga – アイドルマスター(おジャ魔女カーニバル) / Posted on 04-22-2007

    [6]Nico Nico Douga – Search results for the tag おジャ魔女カーニバル!!


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    (Work In Progress)


    About

    “Say That To My Face Not Online” is an expression used to call someone out to engage in person, outside of the Internet. It is often associated with Internet Tough Guys.

    Origin

    The phrase is thought to have surfaced somewhere in 2008 as an image macro, featuring Zach Roloff[1] from Little People, Big World with a caption “Say that to my face fucker not online and see what happens” below. The earliest archived use of the image can be dated back to a thread on 4chan’s /a/ board on June 27th, 2008[2].


    Spread

    The original image macro had also appeared on sites like BodyBuilding.com[3], GrassCity.com[4], and IGN[5]. On January 27rd, 2013, a YouTube user Caska4 uploaded a video[6] of Zyzz saying “Say it to my face fucker and not online and see what happens”. As of April 2014, the video had gotten over 10,000 views and 53 thumbs up.



    Over the last few years, Several other image macros featuring the phrase were created on sites like MemeGenerator and QuickMeme.

    Notable Examples


    External References


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  • 04/08/14--14:57: Crappy Taxidermy
  • About

    Crappy Taxidermy is a single topic blog that highlights photographs of bizarre-looking or poorly stuffed animal skins. Since its launch in 2009, the site’s popularity has led to the creation of similar online projects devoted to crudely taxidermied creatures.

    Origin

    On May 26th, 2009, the Crappy Taxidermy[3] Tumblr blog was launched, which highlights humorous photos of taxidermied animals. The blog’s first post featured a mounted squirrel with a menacing expression and sharp, jagged teeth (shown below).



    Spread

    On August 10th, 2009, a Facebook[4] page titled “Crappy Taxidermy” was created with images taken from the Crappy Taxidermy Tumblr blog. On March 30th, 2010, the “Crappy Taxidermy” group was launched on the photo-sharing site Flickr.[8] On May 1st, 2011, the art and design blog TrendHunter[9] published an article about the Crappy Taxidermy blog. On March 6th, 2012, the tech news blog Complex Tech[7] listed Crappy Taxidermy as the 56th best Tumblr blog of all time. On February 20th, 2013, BuzzFeed[10] highlighted 13 examples of “taxidermy gone terribly wrong.” On February 21st, 2014, the “Crap Taxidermy” Facebook[2] page was launched, gathering more than 105,000 likes in the next two months. The first post on the page highlighted a photograph of a stuffed donkey missing both forelimbs.





    On March 11th, the @CrapTaxidermy Twitter feed was launched with a photograph of a poorly-stuffed wild cat. In the first month, the feed gained over 85,000 followers. On March 31st, BuzzFeed[6] highlighted 19 notable tweets from the Twitter feed.




    On April 3rd, the publishing company Cassell Illustrated announced in a press release[12] that a book based on the Crappy Taxidermy Tumblr blog was scheduled for release in Autumn 2014. On the following day, CNN[5] published an article about poor-executed taxidermy photos, which included interviews with the Crappy Taxidermy Tumblr founder Kat Su and the @CrapTaxidermy Twitter creator Nish. On April 8th, Slate[1] published an article titled “Crappy Taxidermy Internet Meme is Really sort of Sad,” which examined the history of poorly-taxidermied animal photos on the web.

    Notable Examples




    Depression Dog

    Depression Dog is an advice animal image macro series featuring a photograph of a taxidermied dog with captions that typically present bleak situations with a downtrodden outlook.



    Stoned Fox

    Stoned Fox (Упоротая лиса) is a Russian photoshop meme in which a cutout image of a stuffed fox is superimposed into different base images of various humorous contexts. The nickname has been approximately translated as “Stoned Fox” and “Autistic Fox.”



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/09/14--09:39: It's Just a Mask
  • About

    “It’s Just a Mask” is a quote said by the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles character Michelangelo as he removes his mask to reveal his face in a rooftop scene from the 2014 live-action adaptation of the comic book and animation series. Following the release of the first official trailer, the scene inspired numerous parody animations in which Michelangelo reveals himself as another fictional character.

    Origin

    On March 27th, 2014, the official trailer for Michael Bay’s upcoming film Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was released via YouTube. In the last scene of the trailer, Michelangelo makes a dramatic appearance before his future human ally April O’Neil and tries to reassure the frightened reporter that his bandana is “just a mask” before scaring her even more by revealing his anthropomorphized turtle face (shown below, left). Within two weeks, the trailer received more than 30 million views and 29,000 comments. On the following day, YouTuber AJ Jefferies posted an edited version of the scene in which Michelangelo removes the mask to reveal the head of a ninja turtle from the 1990 live-action film Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (shown below, right).



    Spread

    On March 29th, 2014, YouTuber Bowz posted an animated parody of the scene in which Michelangelo reveals himself as the ogre Shrek (shown below, left). In the first ten days, the video gained over 168,000 views and 400 comments. The following day, the video was reuploaded to Newgrounds,[1] where it subsequently won both the “Daily Feature” and “Weekly 5th Place” awards.



    On April 5th, YouTuber Ricepirate uploaded a Harry Potter-themed parody (shown below, left) and YouTuber TwistedGrimTV posted a version in which Michelangelo’s face is revealed to be a snapping turtle (shown below, right). In the first week, both videos garnered upwards of 130,000 views and 160 comments.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]Newgrounds – Just a Mask


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  • 04/09/14--10:25: The Iron Throne
  • About

    The Iron Throne is the royal seat of the King of the Seven Kingdoms in the fictional universes of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire and the HBO drama series adaptation Game of Thrones. Due to its symbolic significance in both versions of the series, the throne has been often parodied by the fans and incorporated into crossover fan art featuring characters from other fictional universes.

    Origin

    On January 14th, 2011, HBO’s official YouTube channel[3] released a preview trailer for Game of Thrones in which nearly every central character is shown sitting on the Iron Throne, along with their secret ambitions narrated in voiceover. In the months leading up to the series premiere on April 17th, 2011, the Iron Throne became heavily employed in promotional posters, trailers and other marketing stunts.



    The first known fanmade parody of the Iron Throne appeared in a webcomic by brokecomics[5] on July 8th, 2011. Cleverly titled "Throne of Games, the comic featured Ned Stark dressed as a video gamer sitting on a throne made of various controllers.



    In Canon

    In George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, the Iron Throne is described as the royal seat upon which the ruler of the Seven Kingdoms, or the King’s Hand in his absence, sits. The throne, which is said to be made from 1,000 swords welded into the form of a chair with dragon’s fire,[2] also serves as a coveted symbol of power for those seeking the throne, similar to the depiction of the One Ring in J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.

    Spread

    On December 4th, 2011, The Simpsons[1] included a scene parodying the Iron Throne in the episode titled “The Ten-Per-Cent Solution,” in which at least five identical looking thrones are briefly depicted in the background.



    On June 1st, 2012, DeviantArt[4] user WirdouDesigns uploaded a picture titled “The Iron Throne” which featured an iron sitting on the Iron Throne. As of April 2014, the art has gained over 4,000 views.



    On March 3rd, 2014, Parks and Recreation uploaded a deleted scene from the previous week’s episode “Anniversaries” which shows Ben, a known diehard fan of Game of Thrones, turning manic with excitement after being presented with a replica of the throne by his wife Leslie. As of April 2014, the video has over 85,000 views.



    On March 10th, Grumpy Cat’s official Twitter account[6] tweeted a picture of her sitting in the Iron Throne at the SXSW festival. The picture received over 1,500 retweets and over 1,400 favorites as of April 2014.




    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]HBO Watch – The Simpsons Parody Game of Thrones

    [2]Game of Thrones Wikia – The Iron Throne

    [3]YouTube – HBO

    [4]DeviantArt – The Iron Throne

    [5]BrokeComics – Throne of Games

    [6]Twitter – RealGrumpyCat

    [7]YouTube – Parks and Rec


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    W.i.p, free editorships for requesting

    About

    The Fallout:Equestria is a cross over fan fiction between the My Little Pony:Friendship is Magic and the Fallout universe.

    Origin

    The story similiar to the Fallout 3’s story, revolves around a survivor, her name is Littlepip and she workes as a Pip-Buck (a ponified version of Pip-Boy) engineer in a Stable (a ponified version of Vaults). The final version of the fanfic is a 43 chapters (roughly 620,000 words) long. And it’s spawned several Spin-offs and Side stories. However so far only two fics is looked as “canon”, the original and a clopfic.


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  • 04/09/14--14:22: #Aftersex
  • About

    #Aftersex is a hashtag used to highlight post-coital selfie taken and uploaded by couples on Instagram. Upon its breakout in March 2014, the hashtag has been largely criticized as an example of oversharing in the social media.

    Origin

    The earliest known selfie featuring the #aftersex hashtag was posted to Instagram[1] by user arielchapaval on September 8th, 2013 (shown below).



    Precursor

    On October 1st, 2008, the indie culture magazine Vice[12] published several interviews with couples who had just finished having sexual intercourse. On July 13th, 2012, Vice released the first in their “People Who Just Had Sex” video interview series (shown below).



    Spread

    On March 5th, 2014, Instagram[2] user marcyuanaz23 posted a Snapchat photo of a man in bed with a woman who resembles pop singer Miley Cyrus with the hashtag “#aftersex” (shown below).



    On March 26th, the pop culture blog Nerve[3] published an article about the #aftersex hashtag, which criticized the practice as a form of “gloating.” On March 27th, the tech news blog CNET[4] highlighted several examples of #aftersex selfies. On March 31st, Twitter user Richie Goslin tweeted a photograph of his girlfriend holding a positive pregnancy test while he is shown sulking in the background using the hashtag #aftersex. In the following week, the hashtag was used more than 8,800 times on Instagram[13] and well over 10,000 times on Twitter.[14]




    News Media Coverage

    On March 26th, the pop culture blog Nerve[3] published an article about the #aftersex hashtag, which criticized the practice as a form of “gloating.” On March 27th, the tech news blog CNET[4] highlighted several examples of #aftersex selfies. In the coming days, several news sites published articles criticizing the Instagram selfie trend for being unnecessary, including The Daily Mail,[5] Time.[6] E! Online,[7] The Huffington Post,[8] Gothamist,[9] The Guardian[10] and Neatorama.[11]

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/09/14--23:12: The Frollo Show

  • The Frollo Show is a YouTube series created by Chincherrinas that focuses on Frollo and Gaston being silly and carefree, also meeting a lot of people in the meanwhile, slowly changing the lives of everyone involved.

    Origins

    In 2011, the YouTube Poop Frollo Faps to a Firefighters Calendar was released because Chincherrinas wanted to make a Youtube Poop starring Frollo. The reception was positive, and more episodes began popping up, slowly creating a storyline.

    After Frollo Sees Dead People, the series merged as its own independent series away from the YouTube Poop format. It evolved into an actual show with conflicting plots and proper character interactions and development. It is still growing strong after 2 years.

    Reception

    The Frollo Show has been given much positive feedback in the YouTube community, even though people still mistake the series as a YouTube Poop. The episodes before Frollo Sees Dead People are placed amongst some of the best Frollo YouTube Poops by many (Poops like Gaston and Frollo Get a Life, Frollo Opens a Catholic Church, ect.). The modern Frollo Show has been praised for its edits, jokes, and storyline.

    Parodies and tributes, like this one and this one were made in honor of the series.

    Series’ Creations

    The Frollo Show also took to the creative route in intoducing certain unique aspects, like The Bros Pose and the Cousin characters. For more information on both, please visit their respective pages.

    The Bros Pose

    The Bros Pose is the signature memetic pose of The Frollo Show. The pose originated in Frollo Gets AIDS, where Frollo and Gaston pose to celebrate the purchase of the Magic Fire.

    In the words of the creator, Chincherrinas, “It consists of two best buds, the one at the left doing a thumbs up, and the one at the right stretching arms in celebration. Its also customary that the one at the left sports dark colors, while the one at the right bright ones, specially red… still, there can be some exceptions to that ruru. The bros pose is usually used when said buds came up with a stupid solution, or for the hell of expressing companionship.”

    The Bros Pose is usually accompanied by the Item Get fanfare from Luigi’s Mansion, although some situations exclude this detail. Also, static images of the pose traditionally use a flashy blue background. The Bros Pose is also traditionally put in the end of every Leet Fighters episode, mainly relating to a character or characters.

    Characters

    The series revolves around characters from multiple medias, like movies, anime, television, video games and others. Sometimes, custom characters are created.

    W.I.P.

    Episodes and Plot

    Frollo Faps to a Firefighters Calendar



    W.I.P.

    Frollo Strikes Back

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Saves The World

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Reads Mein Kampf

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Gets AIDS

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Sees Dead People

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Misses his Mother

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Tries to Get Laid

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Beats Up Evil Residents

    W.I.P.

    Frollo is Too Young

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Gets Interrupted by Hitler

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Enters a Mexican Contest

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Fucks the Gods

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Has a Bad Feeling

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Gets Flashed by a Gothic Lolita

    W.I.P.

    Frollo Finally Does It

    W.I.P.

    Fandom

    The Frollo Show Fans have to make thier own the Bro’s/Sista’s/Brosista’s Pose






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  • 04/10/14--02:51: I'm Getting Excited
  • About

    I’m Getting Excited (Japanese: テンション上がってきた, Tension Agatte Kita) refers to a blurry photo taken from a TV interview with Ichiro Suzuki. Since 2006, this quote with a blurry head has been one of the popular expressions for Japanese internet users’ excitement.

    Origin

    This meme originated from an interview with Ichiro at Safeco Field, the home stadium of the Seattle Mariners that he was belonging to. A screenshot of Ichiro coincidentally shaking his head was taken by a Japanese internet user. And, the caption in this screenshot is his answer to interviewer “I’m getting excited”.



    “I’m getting excited”

    In the Japanese language, “Tension” (テンション) is a loanword from English which means degrees of excitement or motivation, and it has no negative nuance. For example, Hi-tension (テンションが高い, Tenshyon ga takai) is meaning of “Excited”, and Low-tension (テンションが低い,Tenshyon ga hikui) is meaning of “Not excited” or “Unmotivated”. However, it’s a casual expression which is seldom heard in interviews with middle-aged athletes like Ichiro even in those days.

    Spread

    It’s unclear when this interview was aired. But this photo began circulating on the Japanese web in the late of July 2006. The most well-known host of this screenshot is a Japanese image uploader pya! which posted it on 23rd of that month[1], and it was reprinted to many 2channel related blogs’ posts via funny picture threads in that textboard community. Peoples were soon fascinated by surrealistic lulz of this photo, that was caused by the contrast of Ichiro’s quite normal facial expression in strange blurry photo and that catchy remark. Then, a photo collage fad inspired by ichiro’s blurry head started in the Japanese imageboard community Futaba Channel (2chan). “Getting Excited” picture generators were also released in the following years.[2][3]



    Before / After

    In addition, Ichiro’s blurred headshaking photo became to one of the formulae of expressing excitement in online parodies throughout sharing of his picture and collaged photos. Japanese illustrators community pixiv has over a hundred of illustration tagged under this catchphrase[4], and many of them utilize headshaking to express characters’ extraordinary excitement.

    Notable Examples




    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]pya! – キタ━━━━━(゚(゚∀(゚∀゚(☆∀☆)゚∀゚)∀゚)゚)━━━━━!! 旧作品No.30524 / Posted on 07-23-2006 (Japanese)

    [2]工学ナビの中の人の研究と周辺 – イチローの「テンション上がってきた」を再現するソフト / Posted on 06-08-2007 (Japanese)

    [3]黒羊工房 – テンション上がってきたジェネレーターβ版 / Launched in 2007

    [4]pixiv – Search results for the tag テンション上がってきた


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  • 04/10/14--02:51: I Was Almost Coming
  • About

    I was Almost Coming” (Japanese: ほぼイキかけました, Hobo ikikake mashita) a catchphrase coined by the Japanese baseball player Ichiro Suzuki. It became to a buzzword shortly after it was uttered in the 2009 World Baseball Classic.[1]

    Origin

    The interview which Ichiro says “I was almost coming” aired after the victory ceremony in the 2009 World Baseball Classic on March 24, 2009. Regardless of the context in dialogue, it was nevertheless seen as an unacceptable expression for broadcasting. Eventually, Ichiro released a public apology by saying “Sāsen”, an easy pronounciation of “Sumimasen” (lit. “I’m sorry.”):



    Spread

    This superstar’s utterance immediately caught everyone’s heart and became to be dubbed as “The Coolest Dirty Joke in The World” (世界一カッコいい下ネタ). Then, the notorious soundbite became to be utilized in many MAD videos on the Japanes video sharing service Nico Nico Douga (NND) alongside another phrase appearing in the same interview “Azāssu” (アザーッス), an easy pronunciation of “Arigatou Gozaimasu (lit. “Thanks.”).[2] Among those MAD remixes, This video below, “Ichro’s Gourmet Race”, a derivative of Kirby's Gourmet Race Remixes, had been watched over 1million times.[3] It was posted to NND on the same day of Japan’s WBC victory.



    As a result of this online frenzy, “I was almost coming” succeeded to be ranked in the 4th in Japanese Internet Vogue’s Word Award of 2009. that was held in November of that year.[4]

    Notable Examples


    【ニコニコ動画】W.B.C.イチローはほぼイキそうなのか?最終日本代表英雄イチロー・S【ニコニコ動画】【WBC MAD】 野球先進国 ほぼイキローキャニオン【サンドキャニオン】
    Left: U.N.Owen was Her? | Right: Sand Canyon
    【ニコニコ動画】ほぼイキかけマイム 【イチローxマイムマイム】【ニコニコ動画】【イチロー】イきかけの一朗信仰 ~ Laser Fusion【東方地霊殿】
    Left: Mayim Mayim | Right: Nuclear Fusion

    Illustrations

    As a parody for his utterance, illustrations related to this phrase on illustrators community, pixiv[5] and Nico Nico Seiga[6], often feature Ichiro’s face of “ecstasy”. Additionally, his goodbye pose at the end of the interview is also a subject for tributes.





    Search Interest

    External References

    Editor’s Note: Registration is needed to browse the original videos listed in this section.

    [1]Wikipedia – 2009 World Baseball Classic

    [2]niconico Douga – Search results for the tag ほぼイキかけました

    [3]niconico Douga – ほぼイきかけたイチローのグルメレース / Posted on 03-25-2009 (deleted)

    [4]MSN Sankei news – 【Web】2009年のネット世相は? / 11-26-2009 (Internet archive, Japanese)

    [5]pixiv – Search results for the tag ほぼイキかけました

    [6]Nico Nico Seiga – Search results for the tag ほぼイキかけました


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  • 04/10/14--02:52: Ichiro Laser Beam
  • About

    Laser Beam is a nickname given to the throws by Ichiro Suzuki. These phrases for the Japanese baseball superstar became the target of online parodies, including a series of MAD videos on the Japanese video sharing service Nico Nico Douga (NND) in 2007.

    Origin

    Said by announcer, Rick Rizz[1], on April 11, 2001, and used again in PBS’ documentary, The Tenth Inning[2], the phrase, “Ichiro laser beam!” became quite popular; frequently replayed in Japan. This created some minor controversy in American media, doubting whither Ichiro lived up to his hype.



    Spread

    Nowadays, “Laser Beam” is a well-known catchphrase of outfielders’ awesome throws among both Japanese people and mass media. Besides, the original footages of “Ichiro Laser Beam” again came to light as a audio/visual resource for online parodies after people became to be able to share it via video-hosting hubsites.

    The most well-known instance in the “Ichiro Laser Beam” parodies is this video seen below which was originally titled as “Doom by Ichiro’s Laser Beam”. It was posted to NND on August 8th 2007.[3] The zany BGM heard in this video is “Bon Mawari” (盆周り), and is well-known for being featured on the popular Japanese comedy show in the 70’s. This was also the origin of the popular MAD series on NND, known as the イチロー レーザービーム


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  • 04/10/14--09:14: David Cameron's Phone Call
  • About

    David Cameron’s Phone Call refers to a photograph of the British prime minister David Cameron on the phone with U.S. President Barack Obama which became the subject of a parody photo fad on Twitter in March 2014.

    Origin

    On March 5th, 2014, 3:18 PM (ET), a photograph of British prime minister David Cameron discussing the 2014 Crimean Crisis on the phone with President Obama was tweeted via Cameron’s official Twitter account.[6]




    Over the course of the month, the photo has been retweeted over 9,000 times and received over 4,000 favorites.

    Spread

    The same day at 4:48 PM (ET), Twitter user richrich808[7] tweeted a picture of himself on the phone using the hashtag #davecalls[8] with the caption “Just paid my water bill,” mocking the implied brag of Cameron’s caption “I’ve been speaking to @BarackObama about the situation in Ukraine.”




    Soon, numerous celebrities including Rob Delaney[9] and Patrick Stewart[10] joined in on the meme via Twitter.







    Also on March 5th, The Mirror[11] and Buzzfeed[12] reported on the meme with some of the best examples.

    Notable Examples



    Australian PM Tony Abbott’s Phone Call

    On April 9th, 2014 5:01 AM EST, Australian prime minister Tony Abbott’s official Twitter account posted a photo of him getting an update on the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 .[1] Within 24 hours, the photo had gained over 120 favorites and over 180 retweets.




    Shortly after Abbott’s photo was tweeted out, Australian Twitter users began tweeting their own photos at Abbott pretending to be the person on the other end of the phone. At 5:30 AM (ET), Twitter user Slipperyseal[2] tweeted a photo of himself holding an electric toothbrush to his ear as if he were speaking on the phone with Abbott.




    Some participants substituted the phone with an alternate household item, such as a banana, a bottle and a video game controller.



    On April 10th, several websites reported on the meme and compared it the one sparked by Cameron including Buzzfeed[3], The Huffington Post UK[4], and The Independent.[5]

    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 04/10/14--14:20: Bullshit Detector
  • About

    Bullshit Detector is a hypothetical measuring instrument that can supposedly determine the validity of a claim or argument. In online forums and comments, the device is most commonly summoned in response to a dubitable claim in the form of a reaction image.

    Origin

    On February 19th, 2006, a promotional website was launched for the “universal bullshit detector," a novelty wristwatch that makes a mooing sound when activated by the wearer.



    Precursor

    In Season 10 Episode 22 of the animated television series The Simpsons, originally aired on May 9th, 1999, the character Professor Frink uses a device to detect sarcasm (shown below).



    Spread

    On September 18th, 2009, the tech news blog Gizmodo[5] posted an article titled “Scientists Race to Develop Political Bullshit Detector,” which contained an image of a “bullshit amplifier / detector” (shown below). On September 22nd, 2009, the fitness blog T-Nation[4] highlighted the same image in an interview with competitive power lifter Jim Wendler.



    On July 15th, 2011, an Android app titled “Bullshit Detector” was submitted to the Google Play Store,[2] which features a needle indicator that responds to the tilt of a mobile device (shown below, left). On September 1st, a bullshit detector app was released on Apple’s iOS store[3] with a similar interface (shown below, right).



    On May 1st, 2012, a Facebook[6] page titled “The Bullshit Meter” was launched, which features a userpic of a bullshit detection reader (shown below, left). On July 1st, Paracast Forums[7] member stonehart posted a “B.S. meter” image in a thread about an unidentified flying object (shown below, right).



    Notable Examples



    Give-A-Fuck-O-Meter

    In 2010, following the emergence of Internet slang expressions like “not a single fuck was given” and “look at all the fucks I give”, and the subsequent unitization of the word “fuck," an animated GIF variation of the device dubbed the “Give-A-Fuck-O-Meter” rose to popularity, which exudes a more relaxed, carefree or apathetic attitude towards the claim in question (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/10/14--19:51: Finding Neverland
  • Editor’s note: Needs more researching and evaluation

    About

    “Finding Neverland” is an image macro series of a 3 panel image showing a conversation between characters Barrie (played by Johnny Depp) and Peter (played by Freddie Highmore) in the 2004 movie, Finding Neverland[1]. The first panel features a teary eyed Peter telling Barrie why he’s upset, followed by a panel where he looks at him for a moment and a final panel where he gives Peter a sympathetic hug.

    Origin

    The images are taken from the final scene of the movie, where Barrie promises Peter to always be there for him and assures him that his dead mother has gone to Neverland.



    Spread

    The images are most popularly shared on the closed social networking service Path[3] among Indonesian users.

    Notable Examples



    Variations

    “What did you study?” “X.”



    External References


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