Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 148 | 149 | (Page 150) | 151 | 152 | .... | 202 | newer

    0 0
  • 02/07/15--07:35: Battlefield Series
  • About

    Battlefield is a series of First Person Shooters published by Electronic Arts TM and developed by Digital Illusions CE. The series focuses on online multiplayer combined arms combat featuring infantry, Aerial, Naval, and Ground Vehicles over a large, open ended maps and teamwork-focused gameplay.

    History

    Early Series



    Battlefield 1942 was released on September 10, 2002, and introducing the “Conquest” gameplay mode, in which players fought for “capture points” throughout the map, boasting a impressive 64 players available in one instance of gameplay, and creating it’s signature 6-string sting, which is now the ubiquitous theme for the series



    Battlefield Vietnam, released in 2004, moved the setting to the Vietnam War, various gameplay improvements, such as firing personal weapons while seated in vehicles. It also marked the series’ first use of licensed soundtracks, utilizing such era-defining tracks such as The Trashmen’s Surfin’ Bird and Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Fortunate Son



    Battlefield 2 , released in 2005 takes place in the modern day, during a fictional war between the United States, China, and the fictional Middle Eastern Coalition. It was a commercial success, selling over 2,250,000 copies worldwide, A version of the game called Battlefield 2: Modern Combat was also released for consoles.



    Battlefield 2142 was released in 2006, taking place during a global ice age in the 22nd century, featuring science fiction weaponry, ordnance, and vehicles and battles between two giant “Titan” airships. This was the first game in the series to award players with the enemy’s dogtags after a successful melee kill.

    Modern Series



    Battlefield: Bad Company and Bad Company 2, released in 2008 and 2009 respectively, introduced a story driven, singleplayer experience to the series, following the infamous “B” Company’s AWOL escapades and their search for mercenary gold. This spin-off series features modern day weapons, as well as a variety of vehicles for land, air and sea. It also served as the tech demo for the Frostbite engine developed for the next generation of games, featuring improvements in all aspects of development including audio, animation, cinematics, scripting, artificial intelligence, physics, destruction, rendering, and visual effects.



    Battlefield 3 and 4 was released in 2011 and 2013 respectively, reintroducing several elements absent from the Bad Company games, including fighter jets, the prone position and 64-player battles on PC. and launched the next iteration of the Frostbite engine, allowing for larger-scale set pieces and enhanced destruction.



    Battlefield: Hardline is the next upcoming iteration of the series, moving away from military warfare to law enforcement and organized crime combat. Expected to release in 2015.

    Reception

    In 2012, Joystiq reports that the series has served over 50 million players[1], and over the course of 14 games and 17 expansions, has won hundreds of awards and accolades from major review sites, including GameSpot, Gameinformer, and GamePro.[2]



    Community Works and Parodies

    The series has spawned many works from the community and fanbase across the web, including stunt videos, machinima, and parodies, one of the earliest being “Mine!!!” by Snoken and Sudden[3] , a Battlefield 2 machinima uploaded on October 23, 2006, which has currently received 1.3 million views and over 13,000 upvotes.



    On December 8, 2011, Youtuber Stun_gravy uploaded a video entitled “Battlefield 3 – RendeZook”[4], which gained over 11 million views and over 35,000 comments. the impressive feat featured has also gained fame within the community with many reproductions around the internet.



    Battlefield Friends is a web animation series created by YouTube channel HankandJed[5] , which features comedy and parodies of many elements of the game Battlefield 4 . The series was met with positive reception, Gaining 3 million views from it’s premiere episode and spawning numerous dubs.



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Joystiq – " Battlefield series celebrates 7 year anniversary: over 50 million served

    [2]EA – Battlefield 3 -- More than 60 Awards From Worldwide Press

    [3]YouTube – battlefield 2 Mine!!!! by Snoken and Sudden

    [4]YouTube – Battlefield 3 RendeZook

    [5]YouTube – Battlefield Friends by Hank and Jed


    0 0
  • 02/07/15--09:12: KrainaGrzybowTV
  • The entry is researching and in progress.


    About

    KrainaGrzybowTV, also known as Mushroomland TV, KGTV and Kraina Grzybów is a Polish YouTube channel featuring 60’s themed videos acknowledged for nonsensological, foregein sentences and weird plot, convincing about a mysterious place called Mushroomland. The videos include: Smile Guide’s, Mushroom Melodie’s and OST’s. Series present five main characters: Agatha, Maggie, Agatha’s Mom, Jeansman and Caroline.

    History

    On December 23, 2013, a group of people recognized as students, created an account on YouTube/Google+ named KrainaGrzybowTV[1][2]. The same day, a Poradnik Uśmiechu 1 – Jak skutecznie jabłko (Smile Guide 1 – How to succesfully apple) video was uploaded [3]. Up to date, the episode gained over 1 000 000 views. Shortly after, a official Facebook account was made [4]. On January 6, 2014, KrainaGrzybówTV uploaded Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Czas Pracy (Smile Guide OST– Work Time) [5]and on February 4 Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Zmartwienia (Smile Guide OST– Worries_) [6]. The second guide (_How to make from paper) made appearance 2 months after the first [7]. In a few months, third OST and first Mushroom Melodies Grzybowe Melodie – Ballada w Rytmie Dżins were done [8][9]. People also received a Smile Guide 3 promo teaser W Krainie Grzybów[10]. However, it was deleted by the creator. On May 21, a KrainaGrzybówTV website was established [11]. Through time, KrainaGrzybowTV was regularly posting fake screencaps and photos on Facebook. Past the Mushroom Melodies, channel took a 4 month hiatus, and made a comeback on September 18, in form of Poradnik Uśmiechu 4 – Jak swoje włosy (Smile Guide 4 – How to your hair) [12]. The digit was not a typo, it has been confirmed intentional by an older scheme [13]. Fourth OST from Smile Guide 4 was completed on November 3 [14]. On December 6, almost a full year after original Smile Guide, KrainaGrzybowTV has shown us a yet unexplained video To nie moje (It’s not mine) [15].

    Reception

    The channel has got around 2 500 000 views, 400 000 Google+ views, 300 observers and 30 000 subscriptions due to long waiting time. On Facebook, it has got about 65 000 likes and average of likes for post – 2000.

    Impact

    On May 8, 2014 a Polish YouTuber and critic NiekrytyKrytyk reviewed first two episodes of the show [16]. Two channels, KrainaX and SzopDemaskuje were focusing on Mushroomland’s theme, plot and sense [17][18]. On the website Paranormalne.pl 3 KGTV based threads were written, one closed [19][20]. On reddit, a /r/krainagrzybow/ was founded. It got 98 readers overall [21]. Also user Svajoklis93 founded a KrainaGrzybowTV unofficial wiki, both in English and in Polish [22]. On interia.pl, KG article gained 400 comments [23], on Polish derativate of reddit, wykop.pl article gained 40 comments [24], on Creepypasta Wiki– 200 [25] and on Dwutygodnik– 270 likes [26].

    2014 Agatha Identify Hoax

    On wykop.pl, user incorrectly identified Agatha as a Maria Curie-Skłodowska University student Diana Klimowicz [27].


    Riddles.pl

    There was a KGTV related thread originating from uminus.pl website [28]. Main character – Marcus Molibdenus had a related theme and KrainaGrzybowTV references. Then, bohrystrojka.vot,pl, redirected to bohrystrojka.pl concentrated on a Bohrys Mikołajewicz Helcyn character, based on russian president Borys Jelcyn, Wiktor Mikołajewicz Helcyn and Nadieżda Pietrowa Kuzniecowa [29][30]. The website featured and Agatha, Jeansman and Maggie calendar drawings and Maggie drawing on a mystery video note. Later, the same webpage was apparently “hacked” by Molibdenus, later revealed to be the same person. The author revealed himself as Plaster Rzeczywistości, the semi-creator of KrainaGrzybowTV [31]. The fact itself, is not confirmed. On December 19, 2014 a Bohrys related site was launched. It’s character’s name is Mrots Dnasedurad, a pun from Darude – Sandstorm, a well known meme [32].

    Teufel

    Teufel– aka devil, is a rumor based on a caption from Smile Guide 1, that Maggie the squirrel is actually a demon trying to abduct Agatha from her mom.


    Fandom

    On KG related posts, Facebook users posted fanarts, cosplay, reaction images and remixes. On YouTube people uploaded KGTV reveal videos and episode parodies.

    Notable Examples

    Researching.


    Exploitable comic

    On June 6, 2014, on Facebook, KrainaGrzybowTV posted an image with a “wytłumacz jej” (“explain to her”) postscript, which received over 160 comments with edits of the comic [33].



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]YouTube – KrainaGrzybowTV

    [2]Google+ – KrainaGrzybowTV

    [3]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu 1 – Jak skutecznie jabłko

    [4]Facebook – KrainaGrzybowTV

    [5]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Czas Pracy

    [6]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Zmartwienia

    [7]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu 2 – Jak zrobić z papieru

    [8]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Na Złej Drodze

    [9]YouTube – Grzybowe Melodie – Ballada w Rytmie Dżins

    [10]YouTube – W Krainie Grzybów – zwiastun odcinka trzeciego

    [11]Koszulka.tv – KrainaGrzybowTV

    [12]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu 4 – Jak swoje włosy

    [13]Facebook – codzienna pielęgnacja twarzy

    [14]YouTube – Poradnik Uśmiechu OST– Nowe Przebudzenie

    [15]YouTube – To nie moje

    [16]YouTube – Niekryty Krytyk ocenia: Kraina Grzybów

    [17]YouTube – KrainaX

    [18]YouTube – SzopDemaskuje

    [19]paranormalne.pl – "Projekt “Kraina Grzybów”.":http://www.paranormalne.pl/topic/37781-projekt-kraina-grzybow/

    [20]paranormalne.pl – Zagadki nie dot. Krainy Grzybów

    [21]reddit – Kraina Grzybow

    [22]Wikia – Kraina Grzybow Wiki

    [23]Interia – Kraina Grzybów – największa tajemnica polskiego internetu

    [24]wykop.pl – Poradniki Uśmiechu (Kraina Grzybów) – rozwiązanie zagadki

    [25]Wikia – Creepypasta Wiki – Kraina Grzybów

    [26]Dwutygodnik – Kraina Grzybów

    [27]wykop.pl – Więcej o Agatce czyli Dianie i całej “ekipie” stojącej za KGTV

    [28]U- – U miNus Kraina

    [29]bohrystrojka.vot.pl – Bohrystrojka

    [30]bohrystrojka.pl – Bohrystrojka

    [31]Riddles.pl – Plaster Rzeczywistości

    [32]Mrots – Mrots Dnasedurad

    [33]Facebook – wytłumacz jej


    0 0
  • 02/07/15--12:36: Sad Violin
  • (WiP)

    About

    Sad Violin is a nickname given to the song Sad Romance from the soundtrack to the Korean drama Over the Green Fields, which is usually used during a sad or otherwise depressing event in montage parodies.

    Origin

    The song, originally titled “Sad Romance”, was written in 2002 by composer Ji Pyeongkeyon for the soundtrack of the Korean TV drama Over the Green Fields (저 푸른 초원위에) (shown below, left).[1] Pyeongekeyon also made a violin-heavier remix of the song (shown below, right), which has become the most well-known version, and the version used in montage parodies. Song is given as 2002 because that is when the soundtrack apparently came out.


    Spread

    The first known instance of the song on YouTube was on July 25th, 2007 when user elmo126 used the song as background music for a Final Fantasy X music video. As of 2015, the video has over 2,000,000 views and over 7,700 likes. As montage parodies became more popular on YouTube, use of the song became more frequent. On March 14, 2014, YouTuber Dankster Prankster uploaded a heavily distorted version, featuring the phrase “I crei everytime”. Since 2014, the video currently has 48,000+ views and 1,000 likes.



    An air-horn version of the song (shown below) was first uploaded by Youtuber Baba Yetu on April 22nd, 2014. Despite being incomplete, (only about 21 seconds long), it is still used in montage parodies.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    References


    0 0
  • 02/07/15--12:38: Check Out My Mixtape
  • About

    “Check out my Mixtape” and “My Mixtape is Fire” are expressions typically used by amateur rappers to promote their self-released records on social media platforms. On Twitter and in online hip hop communities, both phrases are often said ironically to poke fun at the general overuse of the word “mixtape” by aspiring hip hop artists on the Internet.

    Origin

    On July 7th, 2014, Twitter user @PerfectSceness[5] posted a stock photo of a woman and a young girl sharing a pair of ear buds with the caption “Daquan’s mixtape is fire” (shown below).



    Mixtapes in Hip Hop

    While the use of mix tapes in hip hop music can be traced back to the mid-1970s in New York City, when local artists like Kool Herc and Africa Bambaataa began recording their live performances on audio cassette tapes, the term “mixtape” in its contemporary sense has been used since as early as the 1990s to describe any full-length hip hop album that is released for free or for promotion of an artist’s upcoming official release, whether it be made of written verses or freestyle set to original composition and remixes of popular tracks.

    Spread

    On June 15th, 2014, Twitter user @UrbanEnglish[4] tweeted a mock translation of the expression “Check out my mixtape” as “ignore me” (shown below). In the first eight months, the tweet received more than 1,000 retweets and 660 favorites.



    On November 14th, 2014, YouTuber Filthy Frank uploaded a video titled “Bad Internet Rappers,” in which he mocks amateur rappers for shamelessly promoting their mixtapes and Soundcloud pages (shown below). In three months, the video gained over 940,000 views and 5,900 comments.

    On December 10th, Viner The Vertigo uploaded a video titled “Download my mixtape it’s fire,” in which he makes several barking noises as a preview for his music release (shown below).



    On January 7th, 2015, Cheezburger[3] highlighted a Hide the Pain Harold animated GIF titled “Check Out My Mixtape” (shown below).



    On January 18th, the 8JTV YouTuber channel uploaded a montage of comedy sketches titled “Check Out My Mixtape,” in which a man attempts to force his mixtape on people in a variety of bizarre scenarios (shown below).



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    Not available

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – mixtape

    [2]Twitter – r/BlackPeopleTwitter

    [3]Cheezburger – Check Out My Mixtape

    [4]Twitter – @UrbanEnglish

    [5]Twitter – @PerfectScenes


    0 0
  • 02/08/15--15:42: Brian Williams Misremembers
  • About

    #BrianWilliamsMisremembers is a Twitter hashtag and photoshop meme featuring the American news anchor and managing editor of NBCNightly News Brian Williams which began in February 2015 following the revelation of the journalist’s false claims about his time he spent in Iraq. The photoshopped images commonly feature Williams present in notable historic events.

    Background

    On January 30th, 2015, NBC anchor Brian Williams recounted a story from the time he spent as a wartime correspondent in Iraq in 2003, claiming that he he was flying in a helicopter that “was forced down after being hit by an RPG.” After the broadcast, several crew members of the U.S. Army who were onboard the aforementioned helicopter came forward saying that Williams was actually on a different helicopter that arrived at the crash site later. Prior to this incident, Williams had told the story on numerous occasions in the media (shown below).



    Notable Developments

    William’s’ Apology

    On February 4th, Brian Williams issued an official apology, describing the tale as “a bungled attempt by me to thank one special veteran.”



    On Twitter

    At 7:36 p.m. on February 5th, Twitter user Ivan the K uploaded a photoshopped image of Williams superimposed over a still shot of the squad members from the 1998 World War II epic film Saving Private Ryan along with the hashtag #BrianWilliamMemories. In less than half an hour later, Twitter user Charles shared an image of the famous American Revolutionary War-era painting Washington Crossing the Delaware with the caption “So, there I was, crossing the Delaware…” and the hashtag #BrianWilliamsMisremembers. Throughout that evening, dozens of similar photoshopped parodies emerged on Twitter under #BrianWilliamMemories[11] and #BrianWilliamMisremembers.[12]



    By February 5th, the photoshops had spread from Twitter to Reddit and shortly after there was the creation of r/brianwillamswasthere.[7] Along with the photoshops, meme generator sites like imgflip,[8] memegenerator[9] and imgur[10] have Brian Williams exploitable macros and have been spreading around the internet. Even Conan O’Brian poked fun at his former NBC colleague. The Twitter reactions were subsequently covered by various online news outlets, such as Business Insider,[2] Washington Times,[3] Mediaite,[4] Total Frat Move[5] and Buzzfeed.[6]


    Notable Examples


    External References


    0 0
  • 02/09/15--06:10: Operation ISIS / #opISIS
  • PLEASENOTE: as of February 9,2015 the entry is brand new and it documents a recent event. The contents of the entry may expand as more and more information become available.

    About

    Operation ISIS, known widely via the hashtag #opISIS, is the name of a hacktivism operation perpetrated by Anonymous against the terrorist organization ISIS, which follows their recent #opCharlieHebdo, their revenge against the attacks to the satirical tabloid Charlie Hebdo. During Operation ISIS, Anonymous hacked various sites and social media accounts that were associated with ISIS or their members.[1]

    Origin

    On February 8th, 2015, the hacktivists collective Anonymous informed via a YouTube video that they will hack into websites, email, Facebook and Twitter accounts owned by ISIS members and used by the latter to recruit new terrorists. The video points out that Anonymous is an extremely wide group, whose members come from a variety of social, religious and racial backgrounds, and that they will hunt down ISIS, considered, a la Sylvester Stallone’s “Cobra”, as a “virus” against which Anonymous is the “cure”[2]:



    Greetings citizens of the world, we are Anonymous,
    Operation ISIS Continues:
    First we need to clarify few a things.
    We Are: Muslims, Christians, Jews…
    We Are hackers, crackers, Hacktivist, phishers, agents, spies, or just the guy from next door.
    We Are students, administrators, workers, clerks, unemployed, rich, poor, We are young, or old, gay or straight.
    We wear smart clothes or rugs, we are hedonists, ascetics, joy riders or activists.
    We come from all races, countries, religions, and ethnicity.
    UNITED AS ONE, DIVIDED BY ZERO…
    We Are Anonymous.
    -REMEMBER…THE TERRORISTSTHATARECALLINGTHEMSELVESISLAMICSTATE,(ISIS), ARENOTMUSLIMS!!!.
    -ISIS; We will hunt you, Take down your sites, Accounts, Emails, and expose you…
    From now on, no safe place for you online…
    You will be treated like a virus, And we are the cure…
    We Own The Internet…
    We are Anonymous, We are Legion, We do not forgive, We do not forget, Expect us.


    As of February 9, 2015 Anonymous successfully disabled more that 80 ISIS social accounts on Twitter, and warned Internet people to “keep a close eye” on certain Facebook accounts which are considered close to ISIS[2].

    Spread

    The news of the Anonymous attack quickly spread among news websites, both for general, technical or IT-related news, all around the world. Many sites show a list of the social accounts hacked by Anonymous. These lists are provided by a group called The Red Cult, which is close to the worldwide hackers network.

    Search interest

    It should be noted that at the time of this article’s publication the “#opisis” hashtag didn’t generate enough search volume to be displayed in the results.

    External references


    0 0
  • 02/09/15--08:58: Anti-Vaccination Movement
  • About

    The Anti-Vaccination Movement, also known as the Anti-Vaxxer Movement, is a grassroots medical activist campaign that opposes the practice of vaccination based on fears about the adverse effects of immunization. The movement is most commonly associated with discredited claims that vaccines are linked to autism spectrum disorders.

    History

    In 1998, the medical journal The Lancet published a paper[1] providing support for the claim that colitis and autism disorders were linked to the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The paper was subsequently discredited with a series of reports released between 2004 and 2010 by British investigative reporter Brian Deer. On September 17th, 2007, the book Louder Than Words: A Mother’s Journey in Healing Autism by Jenny McCarthy was released, in which the actress describes her experiences raising a child with autism. The following day, McCarthy was interviewed on the Oprah Winfrey Show, revealing that she believed an MMR vaccine triggered her son’s autism.

    Online Presence

    On April 11th, 2001, the anti-vaccination website Vaccination Liberation[10] was launched. On June 22nd, 2007, a page for “Anti-vaccination movement” was created on the wiki site Rational Wiki.[9] On February 2nd, 2009, the website Jenny McCarthy Body Count was launched, which lists the number of illnesses and deaths that have occurred since celebrities began speaking out against vaccinations in 2007. The website has since been renamed “Anti Vaccine Body Count.”[2]



    On July 13th, 2013, Something Awful[6] published a compilation of photoshopped parody anti-vaccination ads (shown below).



    On March 17th, 2014, Time[8] published an article titled “4 Diseases Making a Comeback Thanks to Anti-Vaxxers,” which listed measles, mumps, whooping couch and chicken pox as preventable diseases that were on the rise due to anti-vaccination efforts. On July 12th, CollegeHumor released part three of the “If Google Was a Guy” sketch comedy series, in which an personified version of the Google search engine provides search results for an anti-vaxxer (shown below).



    On December 15th, artist Maki Naro published a webcomic titled “Vaccines Work: Here Are the Facts” on the blogging platform Medium.[7] In January 2015, more than 100 people were diagnosed with the measles in 15 states in the United States, which many speculated was caused by parents refusing to vaccinate their children. In February, critics of the anti-vaccination movement began posting joke reviews on the Amazon[3] page for the book Melanie’s Marvelous Measles by Australian anti-vaxxer Stephanie Messenger.[4] On February 4th, Redditor Thalaas submitted a post titled “How I Think Anti-vaxxers view their kids,” which featured a screenshot of the character Lord Farquaad from the Shrek franchise. In the first week, the post gained over 4,100 votes (92% upvoted) on the /r/AdviceAnimals[5] subreddit.



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 02/09/15--12:29: Amen Break
  • THISARTICLEUNDERCONSTRUCTION


    Amen break notation

    About

    The Amen Break is a sample from the 1969 song “Amen, Brother” by the funk/soul group The Winstons. Though the song was a B-side release and was not as popular as other songs by the group, in the 1980s the 6-second drum break became famous throughout the breakbeat and jungle genres and has been passed around greatly due to its lack of copyright control and ease of usage.

    Origin



    The track that the sample comes from, entitled “Amen, Brother”, was a B-side to the more popular “Color Him Father”, which was awarded Golden Record status on July 24, 1969 for selling 1 million copies. The famous drum beat occurs at 1:26 in the song, and is seperated from all other instruments, making it incredibly easy to sample from the song and separate into individual drum beats.



    Rise to Popularity

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s the development of new genres of electronic music, brought on by the invention of the sampler, allowed for DJs to take parts of songs and CD recordings and mix them with other songs, or loop them and play them back over other instrument samples. The editor of the popular Ultimate Breaks and Beats series of music CDs used by DJs, Louis Flores, placed “Amen, Brother” on one of the discs, but significantly slowed down the now-famous break, so that DJs could more easily loop it across two turntables. Eventually, when samplers became more prevalent in music production, the signature break was ripped from the disc, though a later high-quality rerelease of the original song would later take over.[1]

    Soon, the rapidly growing electronic dance movement created entirely new, seperate genres dedicated to songs created mainly by sampling, such as Breakbeat Hardcore, Jungle, Ragga, and Industrial Hardcore. As the usage of sampling grew, as did the usage and copying of the Amen Break. Through a process known as “chopping”, the individual beats of the break were divided into their own samples, and could be freely permuted into completely different drum rhythms, even to the point of being completely undanceable. Today, the Amen Break, due to its incredibly loose legal protection, is even used in advertisements. The website WhoSampled has over 1400 songs containing the Amen Break.

    The popularity of the Amen Break prompted two case studies of its history and rise to fame. The first, by Landon Proctor, was printed onto a vinyl record in 2004 and uploaded to Youtube in 2006. As of 2/9/2015, it has gained over 4,850,000 views (below, left).[2] The second was an hour-long special on the BBC 1XTRA radio station, recorded on March 6, 2011. Since being placed on Youtube, it has gained over 50,000 views (below, right).[3]


    Notable Usage Examples

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 02/09/15--12:39: Hitler Did Nothing Wrong
  • About

    “Hitler Did Nothing Wrong” is a statement used for trolling purposes to deny that the acts Adolf Hitler was responsible for during his reign were morally wrong. Over time the phrase become widely used as a snowclone “X did nothing wrong”.

    Origin

    Certain archives show that, on 4chan, earliest posts saying that Hitler “did nothing wrong” can be dated back to June 29th, 2011[2]. The full phrase though had been used since at least January 30st, 2012[1], when the No.377777777 GET post had contained the phrase.


    Spread

    On August 13th, 2012, an anonymous 4chan user submitted a post calling for others to participate in the Dub the Dew contest and vote the name “Hitler did nothing wrong” among several others to the top of the contest page.



    The phrase had later spawned a snowclone “X did nothing wrong”, which became popular in discussions on imageboards about characters in various forms of media, where it’s discussed about the morality of the actions made by them.

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 02/10/15--09:00: Is This a Pigeon?
  • The entry is researching and in progress.




    About

    “Is this a pigeon?” is a reaction image, used on Tumblr to express confusion. The shot features a young man, improperly specyfying a butterfly as a pigeon. It is being often incorrectly identified as a fail transcription.

    Origin

    The picture originates from a Japanese anime television show The Brave Fighter of Sun Fighbird (太陽の勇者ファイバード), or simply Fighbird [1], Season 1 Episode 3 All Members In! Space Police! (Seizoroi uchû keibitai)", originally 勢ぞろい宇宙警備隊, first aired in Japan on February 16, 1991. The concrete image is taken from the clip, when Yutaro Katori, a humanoidal android created by professor Hiroshi Amano, meets Inspector Satsuda and tells him that he’s “studying”. Afterwards, he confuses a Lepidoptera with a Columbidae and Rosaceae with Violaceae, setting Inspector embarassed.



    Spread

    It first leaked to the Internet on December 6, 2011 by Indizi dell’avvenuta catastrofe on Tumblr accompanied by a #anime subtitles are the new zen tag [2]. It gained 111 000 notes overall [3].



    Later the same day, screenshot was uploaded to meme database – Know Your Meme, in the LOLfansubs/Failsubs entry [4], which has received 30+ upvotes, 4 favorites and 4 comments [5]. On December 11, picture was posted on animeultima.tv website, Funny Pics thread [6]. On Buzzfeed, a entertainment journalism website, image was submitted to 27 Subtitles That Have Gone Awesomely Wrong ranking as 11th position, being inappropriately credited as wrong. The article has got 40+ Facebook comments and 250+ contributions [7].
    On November 23, 2012, the picture got included in Smosh’s 22 Hysterical Anime Screencaps as 2nd place [8]. On a wiki, TV Tropes, section Memes: Tumblr, “Is this a pigeon?” is noted as ‘Photo reply to any picture showing a butterfly[9]. The screencap is commonly exploided on Tumblr with #is this a pigeon hashtag [10].

    Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared 3

    The popular musical film series directed by Becky Sloan & Joseph Pelling, Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared, episode 3 referenced “Is this a pigeon?” fad in form of The Yellow Guy mistaking a butterfly Shrignold for ‘A little baby pigeon’. It begun a new collection of editions and variantions on Tumblr [11].



    Notable Examples



    

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – The Brave Fighter of Sun Fighbird

    [2]Tumblr – Indizi dell’avvenuta catastrofe / Posted on 12-6-2011

    [3]Tumblr – Indizi dell’avvenuta catastrofe Archive

    [4]Know Your Meme – LOLfansubs/Failsubs / Posted on 8-8-2010

    [5]Know Your Meme – Image #213,616 / Posted on 12-6-2011

    [6]animeultima.tv – Funny Pics / Posted on 12-11-2011

    [7]Buzzfeed – 27 Subtitles That Have Gone Awesomely Wrong / Posted on 6-27-2013

    [8]TV Tropes – Memes: Tumblr

    [9]Facebook – Smosh / Posted on 2-21-2014

    [10]Tumblr – #is this a pigeon

    [11]Tumblr – #dhmis


    0 0

    WIP. Feel free to request editorship

    About

    USA Covers’ Kirby, also known as Angry Kirby, is a phenomenon where all Kirby‘s game covers on occident change Kirby’s smile or naive appearence for an angry expression. This has often been subject of parodies.

    Origin

    WIP

    Spread

    WIP

    Notable examples

    WIP

    Search Interest

    External Links


    0 0
  • 02/10/15--10:33: Faceplant
  • Work In Progress


    About

    Faceplant is a term wich used to describe the act of falling and striking the face face to the ground. It is also used as the top text of Demotivational Posters .

    Orgin

    Researching

    According to Wikitionary[1], the term originated as a skateboarding and snowboarding slang.

    Spread

    On may 20, 2003. The first Urban Dictionary entry for “face plant” was made by the user Klepto. (Shown bellow)

    Search Interest



    External Links

    [1]Wikitionary – Faceplant
    Uncyclopedia – HowTo Faceplant


    0 0
  • 02/10/15--13:59: Rihanna's Grammy Dress
  • About

    Rihanna’s Grammy Dress refers to a pink, puffy gown worn by the American pop singer Rihanna during the red carpet ceremony at the 57th Annual Grammy Awards on February 8th, 2015. The wardrobe quickly became widely mocked online and spawned a series of photoshopped parodies on Twitter.

    Origin

    On February 8th, 2015, Rihanna entered the red carpet ceremony at the Grammy Awards in a pink haute couture dress designed by Italian fashion couturier Giambattista Valli. That evening, Twitter user @CalandCo[1] tweeted a picture of the pop star posing on the red carpet juxtaposed next to a photograph of a pink loofah sponge (shown below).



    Spread

    Several minutes later, the Latina Magazine Twitter feed[2] posted a tweet comparing Rihanna’s dress to a Dominican cake topper (shown below). In 48 hours, the tweet gained over 1,000 retweets and 680 favorites. On February 9th, Redditor stdfreeithink submitted a screenshot of the tweet to the /r/BlackPeopleTwitter[10] subreddit, where it gathered more than 940 votes (95% upvoted) within 24 hours.


    <

    The same day, Redditor dazzlingboy submitted a photograph of Rihanna wearing the dress to the /r/photoshopbattles[9] subreddit, where several users responded with photoshopped variations of the image (shown below). In the coming days, several news sites published articles about the online reaction to the dress, including BuzzFeed,[3] Cosmopolitan,[4] Cambio,[5]MTV,[6] Hollywood Life[7] and CNN.[8]



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0



    About

    “Your Favorite Anime Is Shit” and “Your Waifu Is Shit!” are common phrases most frequently used to insult or made a snide remark towards either subjects. The phrase and it’s variants are frequently paired with Saber from the Fate/Stay series. As image edits became more frequent, it went on to inspire the snowclone template “Your X Is Shit” and other methods of insulting someone’s anime or waifu.

    Origin

    The earliest archived instance of the phrase “your favorite anime is shit” dates back to a 4chan thread on the /a/ (Anime & Manga) board.[3] However, discussions about one’s favorite anime have resulted in snide remarks already before that, making it impossible to date the actual start of the phrase. The original panel comes from the Fate/Zero Doujinshi: Fubin Sugiru Zero Saber ga Ijikeru[1] (Translation: A Very Pitiful Zero Saber Grows Timid) by Hiroyuki,[2] which was published in 2012.



    Spread

    [Researching]

    Various Examples



    Search Interest


    External References


    0 0

    About

    i cri evrytiem (also spelled as “i cri evry tiem” and “i cri evrytim”) is a catchphrase to express sadness in a ironic and sarcastic way. liek dis if u cri evrytiem is a derivate catchphrase, normally used on comments in a similar fashion.

    Origin

    The oldest and most popular use of “i cri evrytiem” was the YouTube video by Stuff by David, called “The Poptart Tragedy.”

    Spread

    i cri evrytiem has been used by the popular Jacksfilms in his series"Your Grammar Sucks." It was use the most in the 50th episode, where he used animations similar to Stuff by David. On July 10th of 2014, YouTuber KSI uploaded a video called “I CRIEVERYTIEM.” The video has gotten over 2 million views

    Notable Examples

    Videos



    Comments / Posts

    W.I.P

    Related Memes

    5ever

    5ever (sometimes spelled 5eva or 5evur) is a slang term meaning “more than forever" and the superlative form of its SMS shorthand “4ever.” Believed to have originated from a copypasta story that began circulating in early 2011, the term is used ironically to mimic the non-standard grammar or syntax often found in online conversations. [1]

    Sad Violin

    “Sad Violin” is the fan-given title of “Sad Romance,” an instrumental song from the soundtrack for the 2003 Korean TV drama series Over the Green Fields, that has been featured in a wide range of videos on YouTube, including original sketches, parodies
    and remix videos. [2]

    Search Interest

    External Links

    [1]KYM5ever

    [1]KYMSad Violin


    0 0
  • 02/11/15--12:45: Chris (Simpsons Artist)
  • About

    Chris (Simpsons Artist) is an illustrator known for his bizarre, naïve art-style[8] depictions of characters from various cartoons, live-action television series and films, including The Simpsons and Winnie the Pooh.

    Online History

    On April 16th, 2011, Chris launched the Facebook[1] page “Simpsons pictures that I gone and done,” which gained over 484,000 likes over the next four years. In May, Chris created the @getbentsaggy[2] Twitter feed.



    As early as June 7th, Chris began selling merchandise and prints featuring his illustrations on his art website Pictures That I Gone and Done.[6][7] On February 21st, 2012, the pop culture news blog One and Other[9] published an interview with Chris. In May, the IG:LU art gallery in Inverness, Scotland placed several of Chris’ works on display.[10] On April 16th, 2012, the arts and culture blog Crack in the Road[12] published an interview with Chris. On July 4th, 2014, Chris posted an illustration of the cartoon character Winnie the Pooh taking a jar of “bee syrup” from the cartoon character piglet on Facebook[11] (shown below). In six months, the image garnered upwards of 28,000 likes, 6,800 comments and 5,700 shares.



    Reception

    On March 19th, 2012, Redditor alltheaids submitted a screenshot of a Facebook post in which Chris replies to a fan with a lengthy, bizarre comment (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post accumulated more than 540 votes (92% upvoted) and 20 comments on the /r/facepalm[13] subreddit.



    On November 24th, 2014, Redditor MrBlueish submitted a photograph of a picture frame inspired by Chris’ Winnie the Pooh illustration (shown below). In the first two months, the post gained over 4,600 votes (94% upvoted) and 340 comments on the /r/WTF[14] subreddit. On Tumblr, the fan sites Chris (Simpsons Artists) xox[3] and SimpsonArtistFan[4] highlight artwork by Chris.



    Notable Works



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 02/11/15--19:55: Big Hero 6
  • About

    Big Hero 6 is a computer animated superhero film by Disney based on Marvel’s series of comics of the same name. The movie takes place in the fictional city of San Fransokyo and revolves around the lives of child prodigy Hiro Hamada, personal companion Baymax, and friends, who sought to defeat the mysterious masked man that may have answers to the tragic fire that took the life of Hiro’s brother.

    History


    While the idea for the movie was pitched on 2011, the animated film was released on October 23, 2014 in the Tokyo International Film Festival and on November 7, 2014 in the US. The concept of Disney’s Big Hero 6 was taken from Marvel, which Disney acquired in 2009, making Big Hero 6 the first animated Disney movie to feature Marvel characters[1].

    The first issue of the comics themselves were published by 1998, created by Steven T. Seagle and Duncan Rouleau.[2]

    Reception

    The film is received well critically and commercially worldwide. It currently has a review score of 8.0 on IMDB[3] and an average score of 90% on Rotten Tomatoes[4]. Reviewers agree that the film is brilliantly animated and humorous. The film was nominated for various awards such as the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, Annie Award for Best Animated Feature, and Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature Film[1].

    Impact

    The film was immediately received by the other fandoms that fall under the Disney spectrum. Crossover fan art appeared immediately, even amongst fandoms that have no relations with Disney.


    Fandom

    The tag Big Hero 6 currently yields 14,154 results at Deviantart[5] and #big+hero+6 is highly active in tumblr[6].

    Related Memes

    Baymax


    Baymax is the deuteragonist of Big Hero 6. A naive personal healthcare robot, he follows Hiro Hamada around to ensure his safety. Online, the Baymax Fist Bump and the robot’s various catchphrases such as “On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate your pain?” and “Are you satisfied with your care” have been parodied and deviated upon by the online community similar to Guardians of the Galaxy’s Groot catchphrase, I am Groot.

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Big Hero 6 (film)

    [2]Wikipedia – Big Hero 6

    [3]IMDBBig Hero 6 (2014)

    [4]Rotten Tomatoes – Big Hero 6

    [5]Deviantart – big hero 6

    [6]tumblr – #big+hero+6


    0 0
  • 02/11/15--20:38: Patient Bear
  • About

    Patient Bear is a series of a two photographs showing a black bear sitting at a wooden table, seemingly patiently waiting for something. The unusual aspect of seeing a wild animal acting like a human being caught on among netizens, spawning parodies and even image macros describing everyday waiting annoyances, in a manner not dissimilar to Waiting For Op.

    Origin

    On May 11th, 2008, Kakabeka Falls resident Dorothys Hays, from Ontario, Canada, shot several pictures as well as a video of a black bear trespassing on her property. The video, uploaded to Youtube on December 2nd 2009 (shown below), shows the bear seated at a wooden table in Hayes’ backyard before approaching the house, playing again with the table and eventually running away.

    Among the photos, two would stand out: one showing the bear looking at the viewer (shown below, right) and another one with the bear looking away (shown below, left).



    One of the earliest parodies was made on Motifake[1] on August 15th 2008, using demotivational style to a picture that reads “Picnics. This bear likes them.” (shown below).



    Spread

    Through out the rest of 2008, the initial photographs were heavily shared by emails to animal-loving websites[2], image aggregators such as My Confined Space[3] and Thread Bombing[4] as well as blogs nicknaming the animal “Bearack Obama”[5][6] waiting for aid from the government, in reference to president Barack Obama and his Obamacare plan. It even found itself on 4chan as early as November 2008, in a thread[7] referencing World of Warcraft.
    Around mid to late 2008 as well[9], a new lasting nickname emerged in the form of demotivational images calling the animal “Patient Bear” (shown below). One of its earliest appearance on the web may have been on the now defunct JJ.AM website.



    On January 1st 2012, an Advice Animal entry for Patient Bear[8] was registered to Meme Generator. As of February 2015, the macro, used to express situations in which one is waiting for something, ranked #4,062 on the site and led to the creation of over 1 400 parodies.

    Macros



    Notable Parodies



    Search

    External References

    [1]Motifake – Picnics Bear

    [2]Treehugger.com – Dude Where’s My Dinner?

    [3]My Confined Space – Camping Bear waiting for his food

    [4]Thread Bombing – Classic Pic – Picnic Table bear

    [5]Spark it Up blog – Bearack Obama

    [6]Preacher Pen blog – Cartoons and Politics

    [7]4chan’s /tg/ archive – DAMNDRUIDSTOOD IT UP[4chan archive: may contain NSFW content]

    [8]Meme Generator – Patient Bear

    [9]Humor Hound – Patient Bear demotivational upload


    0 0

    About

    “Stop Liking What I don’t Like” is a phrase often used to mock people who seem to assert that something is bad, often in when said remarks are in discussions where this person’s sentiment is in the minority. This image is frequently paired with images of upset children or babies.

    Origin

    The oldest know usage of the term dates back to 2009[1] in a thread about the anime Clanned. A user posted in the thread “Maybe you faggots wouldn’t have to baaww if you realized that it’s all forced drama with horribly generic character design and stopped watching this utter shit.” to which another responded “STOPLIKINGWHAT I DON’T LIKEGODDAMN IT”

    Spread

    On September 16th 2011, a video was uploaded to Youtube by user Mushrooms [2] titled “STOPLIKINGTHINGS I DON’T LIKE”. In it a man is about to eat a sandwich, when another man slaps the sandwich out of his hand, saying “I don’t like sandwiches”



    On November 24th, 2011 an image titled “angry baby” [3] was uplodeed to memegenrtor with the caption “Stop liking things don’t like!!!!!!!!”. On December 27th 2011 Memecenter user serkan uploaded a picture of two kids playing chess, with he caption of “Stop liking what I don’t like”[4] This version is one of the most commonly used variants.



    Various Examples



    External References


    0 0
  • 02/12/15--13:35: OTP
  • About

    OTP is an acronym for “one true pairing,” a term used to describe a favorite couple consisting of characters from various fandoms as part of a practice known as “shipping”.

    Origin

    According to the Fanlore Wiki,[7] the earliest known use of the term “one true pairing” was featured in a 1984 summary of the zine Alternaties #2, which discussed various Star Trek pairings.

    “This zine has something for everybody…The stories are mostly Spock-centric, so if you love a certain Vulcan, this one’s for you!…And boy, does he get around -- we have Kirk/Spock, Spock/McCoy, Spock/Chapel, Spock/and various others, including T’Pring…And of course, more Kirk/Spock, because we all know that’s our one true pairing!!!…Variety is the spice of life -- and this zine is extremely spicy.”

    Spread

    On October 14th, 2002, the acronym was used in a LiveJournal post discussing the concept of “pairings.”[2] On September 27th, 2003, Urban Dictionary[1] user Erin submitted an entry for OTP, defining it a romantic pairing of characters that have been shipped. On September 29th, 2008, a page for “One True Pairing” was created on the Fanlore Wiki.[7] On December 29th, 2012, YouTuber Troye Sivan uploaded a music video titled “We’re My OTP” about the practice of shipping and writing fanfiction on the Internet (shown below). Within three years, the video gained over 2.3 million views and 20,700 comments.



    On May 5th, 2013, the Tumblr[6] blog OTP Prompts was launched. On July 5th, a page for “One True Pairing” was created on TV Tropes.[3] On April 29th, 2014, YouTuber Tyler Oakley uploaded a video titled “Who is My OTP,” in which he revealed that two Twitter users engaging in an argument were his OTP (shown below).



    Related Terms

    One True Threesome

    “One true threesome” or “3TP” is a label used in reference to a person’s favorite trio group in a fandom.[4]

    BrOTP

    “BrOTP,” a portmanteau of “Bro” and “OTP,” is a term used to label a person’s favorite non-romantic fandom pairing.[5]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Urban Dictionary – OTP

    [2]LiveJournal – what means this pairings=

    [3]TV Tropes – One True Pairing

    [4]TV Tropes – One True Threesome

    [5]Urban Dictionary – BrOTP

    [6]Tumblr – OTP Prompts

    [7]Fanlore – One True Pairing


older | 1 | .... | 148 | 149 | (Page 150) | 151 | 152 | .... | 202 | newer