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  • 04/27/14--14:43: 2014 MV Sewol Disaster
  • Editor’s Note: This entry is still being worked on, any help would be appreciated

    Overview

    The 2014 MV Sewol Disaster was an event in which the Korean ferry MV Sewol capsized and sunk 2.7 kilometers off of Gwanmae Island on April 16th 2014, taking the lives of 187 people of the 476 people on board and leaving 115 of them missing, leaving only 174 survivors

    Background

    The ferry departed from Incheon in South Korea after a fog delay that lasted two and a half hours to the frequently traveled route of the ship that usually lasted 13.5 hours, however, the ship began to take on water on the morning of April 16th 2014, resulting in it capsizing 25.3 kilometers off of the southwest cost, officials said the cause of it was a sharp turn to the right made between 8:48 AM and 8:49 AM, conditions, however, were calm, and no rocks or reefs were reported in the area and passengers felt the ship tilting. At 8:55 AM, the ferry came in contact with the Jeju vessel traffic service and asked them to notify the coast guards that the ship was in danger and sinking

    The Captain’s Response

    The captain was in his private cabin at around the time the capsizing occurred and the third mate was at his helm, the captain reportedly returned to the bridge and tried to re-balance the ship immediately

    Aftermath

    After about two and a half hours, the ship fully sunk, leaving only 174 survivors and 115 passengers missing, reports came out that the death toll was at 187

    Notable Developments

    After the sinking happened, #PrayForSouthKorea was trending on Twitter and #PrayForSouthKoreanFerry was trending on Tumblr, the sinking also became the subject for many news channels and sites such as BBC



    Search Interest


    External References

    W.I.P


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  • 04/28/14--12:11: Subservient Chicken
  • Overview

    The Subservient Chicken was a viral online marketing event staged by the American fast food chain restaurant Burger King to promote its TenderCrisp chicken sandwich in 2004. As the digital component of the larger “Have It Your Way” advertising campaign, the event was centered around an interactive webcam channel where viewers could control the actions of a man dressed in a chicken costume by inputing various commands. In 2014, Burger King relaunched the campaign to promote their Chicken Big King sandwich.

    Background

    On April 8th, 2004, the Subservient Chicken[11] website was launched, featuring a video feed of a man standing in a living room above a text input field in which viewers could type commands to see the man performing a variety of actions.



    According to Wikipedia, there were over 300 commands for the original Subservient Chicken web page.


    moonwalk
    Throw Pillow
    Riverdance or Irish dance
    The “elephant”
    Bowl
    Tango
    Show teeth
    Be an airplane
    Shake your booty
    The Robot
    Lay egg
    Walk Like an Egyptian
    Yoga
    Sleep
    Rage
    Raise the roof
    Dog
    Fall
    Can I eat you?
    Squat
    Peck Ground
    Travolta
    Fight
    Roshambo
    Read a book from his bookcase.
    Have a drink of water
    Blow your nose
    Barrel roll
    Begone or go away
    Turn off the lights
    Jump rope
    Hide behind sofa
    Golf Swing
    Try to do a headstand
    Hide
    Leave
    Sit
    Watch TV
    Pick your nose & eat it
    Spin
    Do the YMCA
    Fly
    Handstand
    Hula hoop
    Cartwheel
    Push-up
    Electric Slide
    Air Guitar
    Tap Dance
    Referee
    Bowl
    Poke your eye out
    3 point stance
    Paint
    Throw a Football
    Backflip
    Turn off the lights
    Sing
    Die
    Pee on the couch
    Pee in the corner
    Pee like a dog
    Do the splits
    headbang
    Pray
    Shakespeare
    Headbutt
    March like a German Soldier
    Swim
    Kick an imaginary soccer ball.
    Jump
    Act like a dog
    Puke
    Fart
    Hug
    Cabbage Patch
    Tai Chi
    Hula
    Ballet
    Breakdance
    Make a sandwich
    Playboy
    Be a monkey
    Macarana (note spelling)
    Kiss
    Go to sleep
    Flap around
    Be a duck
    Do the silly walk


    Notable Developments

    On April 16th, 2004, the marketing news blog Clickz[1] published an article about the Subservient Chicken website, which noted it had received over 46 million visits in the first week of launch. On March 7th, 2005, the advertising news blog AdWeek[2] reported that the site reached more than 14 million unique visitors and 396 million hits. In addition, Burger King reported that TenderCrisp sales had increased an average of 9% per week during the campaign.

    2014 Relaunch

    On April 27th, 2014, the Associated Press[3] reported that Burger King was relaunching the Subservient Chicken campaign to promote the Chicken Big King triple-decker sandwich. That day, the old Subservient Chicken website was redesigned to feature a video feed of an empty room with a pop-up message informing the viewer of a “Missing Chicken Error” along with options to share the page on various social media accounts. In the coming days, several news sites reported on the relaunch, including NPR,[4] Business Insider,[6]USA Today,[7] Time,[8] Gawker,[5]ABC News[9] and UpRoxx.[10]



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/28/14--12:20: Baddie Winkle
  • About

    Baddie Winkle is an 86-year-old woman who has gained a large following on Twitter and Instagram for her youthful sense of humor and free-spirited personality.

    History

    On March 26th, Winkle’s granddaughter Kennedy[4] uploaded a Vine of her uttering the stoners’ catchphrase ‘420 blaze it’ while smoking a hand-rolled cigarette. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 6,000 likes and over 5,000 revines.



    On April 5th, 2014, Baddie Winkle created her Twitter account @baddiewinkle[2] with the tagline “stealing your man since 1928.” Her first tweet featured a selfie with the caption, “I look good when I don’t even try to look good.” In less than a month, the tweet gained over 8,000 retweets and over 6,000 favorites.




    She reached 11,000 followers on Twitter on April 9th.

    Winkle created her Instagram account[1] on April 10th, posting a selfie wearing a tie-dye T-shirt. In less than a month the picture gained over 2,000 likes.



    On April 12th, Winkle tweeted if she gained over 1,000 retweets she would sell tie-dye T-shirts featuring a photo of her wearing a tie-dye T-shirt. The tweet gained over 4,000 retweets, and she began selling the shirts for $28.50 through the Etsy shop Psychicbabe.[8]




    Reputation

    On April 22nd, Buzzfeed[3] published a post titled, “Baddie Winkle Is The Most Hardcore Grandma On The Internet,” which features a collection of some of Winkle’s best Instagram photos.



    On April 26th, she was profiled by The Frisky[5], by Jezebel[7] on April 27th and on April 28th, she was covered by Cosmopolitan.[6] As of April 28th, 2014, Winkle has gathered over 430,000 Instagram followers and over 190,000 followers on Twitter.

    Search Interest

    External References


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    W.i.p feel Free-man for requesting editorship

    About

    The Concerned: The Half-Life and Death of Gordon Frohman, or just simply called Concerned, is a webcomic-parody of the Valve’s second installment of the Half-Life series.

    Origin

    The webcomic was created by Christopher C. Livingston in the sandbox program called Garry’s Mod and it’s centered around a citizen called Gordon Frohman, who in fact is the complete opposite of Gordon Freeman, the protagonist of the Half-Life’s main series (HL1, HL2, Ep 1, Ep 2, et al). The story starts not long before the arrival of Gordon Freeman, and after the arrival of Gordon Frohman. Frohman is obssesed with the combine and he tries to became one of their soldiers. Through the story he makes some accidents which leads, for example, to the destruction of Ravenholm. The webcomic get positive reviews by the critics[1] and it was highly praised by the community for it’s humor and story. The comic ended in November 5, one year after it’s first release. Currently it contains 206 issues, including Issue 0 and the acknowledgments.

    Spread

    External references

    [1]Gamics – Web Archives


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  • 04/28/14--14:34: Friends Don't Let Friends
  • About

    “Friends Don’t Let Friends” is a phrasal template often used to discourage unwanted or inappropriate behaviors which is inspired by the 1980s anti-drunk driving slogan “Friends don’t let friends drink and drive.”

    Origin

    In 1983, the public service announcement (PSA) organization Ad Council launched a “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk” campaign, which featured various PSA videos encouraging people to stop others from driving while under the influence of alcohol (shown below). On February 23rd, 1992, The New York Times[1] published an article titled “Friends Don’t Let Friends Write Bad Poetry,” encouraging poets to exchange drafts with friends for proofreading.



    Spread

    On February 2nd, 2000, Salon[5] published an article titled “Friends don’t let friends use AOL,” which mocked those still using AOL Internet service. On October 27th, 2004, Straight Dope Forums[6] member Shirley Ujest submitted a post titled “Friends don’t let friends wear ponchos,” criticizing poncho-style outer garments. On November 4th, 2009, Newgrounds Forums member Gorzagh submitted an image macro with the caption “Friends don’t let friends use Internet Explorer” (shown below).



    On April 5th, 2010, a Facebook[3] page titled “Friends don’t let friends vote for Tony Abbott” was launched, which features content critical of Australian prime minister Tony Abbott. In the first four years, the page gathered over 165,000 likes. On October 15th, 2011, the RocketJump YouTube channel uploaded a video directed by Freddie Wong and Bradon Laatsch, in which a player accidentally destroys a helicopter due to an inverted control system, ending with the slide “Friends don’t let friends play inverted” (shown below). In the following three years, the video garnered upwards of 4.95 million views and 15,400 comments.



    On July 22nd, 2012, Body Building Forums[9] member Based Princess submitted a photo of a man at the gym with the caption “Friends don’t let friends skip leg day” (shown below) in a post titled “The worst case of chicken legs I have ever seen." In the following two years, the thread garnered 300 replies.



    On October 11th, 2013, YouTuber MattVisual uploaded a video titled “Friends Dont Let Friends PuG,” which featured a parody PSA urging multiplayer game players to avoid attempting difficult video game tasks in random groups.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/28/14--14:55: Make-Up Tutorials
  • About

    Make-up tutorials are YouTube videos in which the vlogger demonstrates tricks and tips on how to apply certain types of make-up.

    Origin

    One of the earliest makeup tutorial videos uploaded to YouTube was posted on November 22nd, 2006, by YouTuber Sandy Gold.[1] The video titled “Sandy’s 10 min. Flawless Face” features Gold demonstrating how to apply a quick and basic makeup look. As of April 2014, the video has over 260,000.



    Spread

    Gold’s next tutorial, which she uploaded on November 28th, gained over 4.8 million views as of April 2014. Several of the most popular makeup tutorial creators joined YouTube in 2007 including Michelle Phan[2] who uploaded her first video on May 20th, 2007.



    By 2010 Makeup tutorial channels had become so common niche makeup sites such as MakeupFiles[3] began publishing roundups of the most popular channels. On June 16th, 2011, The Daily Dot[5] profiled the phenomena of YouTube makeup tutorials in a post titled, “I feel pretty: How to get a YouTube makeover.” In 2012 more popular sites published round ups. On February 12th, 2012, Mashable[4] posted, “Top 10 YouTube Beauty Channels to Follow,” and on April 19th, 2012, the IBTimes[6] posted, “Top 10 Makeup And Hair YouTube Gurus To Help Beautify Your Life.”

    External References


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  • 04/29/14--09:47: AVbyte
  • About

    AVbyte is a YouTube channel featuring a series of short musical productions that are inspired by a wide range of popular media franchises and social media trends.

    Online History

    The AVbyte YouTube channel[1] was launched by New York film students and brothers Antonius and Vijay Nazareth on January 3rd, 2012, with the mini musical titled “MURDERING MUSICALMADNESS!! | Hot Girl Experiences Sudden Death (Scarface Style).” As of April 2014, this video has gained over 69,000 views.



    On July 27th, 2012, another popular YouTube sibling duo Vlogbrothers uploaded a musical episode titled “Tumblr: The Musical,” which was produced in collaboration with AVbyte. According to Antanius Nazareth, the collaboration became the duo’s viral breakout and brought a massive jump in subscribers for the channel. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 1.8 million views.



    On October 1st, 2012, they uploaded a video titled “Hipster Disney Princess-The Musical,” which quickly became one of their most popular videos, gaining over 14 million views as of April 2014. The video was covered by many sites including The Huffington Post[7], Mashable[8] and The Mary Sue.[9]



    In February 2013, the channel was selected to be a part of YouTube’s Next Up program[5], which provides up and coming YouTubers with support and guidance in building their channel and their audience.

    As of April 2014, the most popular AVbyte video is titled “A Musical feat. Disney Princesses,” which was uploaded on February 11th, 2014. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 20.1 million views.



    In addition to their musicals, their channel also features behind the scenes videos (below, left) that documents the production of their musicals and comments videos (below, right) in which the brothers read comments from YouTube and Twitter from their most recent musical.



    Reputation

    As of April 2014, AVbyte’s YouTube channel has over 500,000 subscribers. Its official Facebook page[2] has gained over 21,000 likes and its Twitter account[3] has over 8,000 followers.

    Personal Life

    Antonius and Vijay Nazareth were born in Verona, Italy to two classical musicians.[10]Antonius began college at 13[4], earning a bachelors degree in music from a school in Germany. He attended NYU for one semester in 2011. Vijay attended New York’s City College.

    Notable Videos



    Search Interest



    External References


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  • 04/29/14--11:53: #WeAreAllMonkeys
  • Overview

    #WeAreAllMonkeys (#SomosTodosMacacos in Portuguese) is a hashtag campaign started by Brazilian football star Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior on Instagram in protest of racist hooliganism directed toward his teammate Daniel Alves in April 2014.

    Background

    On April 27th, 2014, a season match between the Spanish football teams Barcelona FC and Villareal was held at the El Madrigal stadium in Villarreal, Spain. During the match, a supporter of Villareal tossed a banana at the feet of Barcelona’s defender Daniel Alves, which is a common racist taunt used by hooligans towards non-European football players. Despite the insulting nature of this gesture, Alves calmly proceeded to pick up the banana and eat it on the field (shown below).



    That same day, the footage of Alves’ clever response was subsequently uploaded to YouTube, gaining more than 863,000 views in the first 48 hours. Also on April 27th, Alves’ teammate Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior posted a photograph on Instagram[1] in which he is shown holding a banana with a young boy, accompanied by the hashtag #weareallmonkeys (shown below). Within 48 hours, the post gained more than 558,000 likes.



    Racist Hooliganism in Football

    In a number of European football leagues, racist hooliganism towards non-White football players has long been regarded as a serious issue, one of the most common offenses being the use of the racial slur “monkey” or similar gestures, such as tossing bananas at ethnic players and making monkey-like noises. The phenomenon has been publicly discussed as early as in September 2005, when French footballer Thierry Henry raised the issue during an interview on HBO’s Real Sports.

    Notable Developments

    On Twitter

    Immediately after posting the photo to Instagram, Neymar tweeted[2] a link to the picture which garnered more than 7,100 retweets and 4,100 favorites in 48 hours. According to the Twitter analytics site Topsy, the hashtag #weareallmonkeys was tweeted more than 97,800 times and the hashtag #NoAlRacismo (#NoToRacism in English) was tweeted upwards of 66,000 times that week.



    On Instagram

    Also on April 27th, 2014, Brazilian singer Michel Teló posted a photograph of himself holding a banana in protest of racist hooliganism on Instagram[3] (shown below, left) with the hashtag #sodostodosmacacos (#weareallmonkeys in English). On the following day, Brazilian singer Gaby Amarantos posted another banana selfie on Instagram[4] (shown below, right). By April 29th, the photos gathered upwards of 15,000 and 6,200 likes respectively. Additionally, over 110,000 photos were shared under the tag #sodostomosmacacos[5] and more than 15,000 photos were shared under the tag #weareallmonkeys.[6]



    FIFA Response

    Shortly after the viral takeoff of #WeAreAllMonkeys, FIFA (International Federation of Association Football) president Joseph S. Blatter[7] tweeted a message condemning the act of racism directed at Dani Alves as an “outrage”




    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References

    [1]Instagram – #weareallmonkeys#

    [2]Twitter – weareallmonkeys

    [3]Instagram – michelteto#

    [4]Instagram – gabyamarantos#

    [5]Webstagram – sodostomosmacacos

    [6]Webstagram – we are all monkeys

    [7]Twitter – @SeppBlatter’s Tweet


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  • 04/29/14--12:23: Hauls
  • About

    A haul refers to a YouTube video in which a vlogger shows of a collection of items from a recent shopping trip or special occasion.

    Origin

    One of the earliest hauls uploaded to YouTube was uploaded by YouTuber Blair Fowler (juicystar07)[3] on April 9th, 2008. The video was a haul featuring MAC cosmetics, and as of April 2014 it has gained over 310,000 views.



    Spread

    On November 2nd, 2008, Yahoo Answers[1] user Larissa R posed the question “Whats a ‘haul’ on YouTube?” User xFollowYourHeart answered saying:

    “A “Haul” on Youtube is referring to when the person purchased many items while they were out shopping at stores and show what they bought and sometimes do a small review of the item."


    The first entry for haul on Urban Dictionary[2] was submitted on August 7th, 2009, by user raven L who defined it as:

    “a vlog titled “Makeup Haul” or “(Store Name) Haul” is a video showing a shopping spree in that given area, showing products or clothing that will usually be featured in future How To, or tutorial videos."


    On February 26th, 2010, Marketplace[4] published an articled titled “The new YouTube sensation: Hauls,” which featured several commentators, including consumer culture writer Rob Walker, weighing in on the popularity of hauls.

    On December 14th, 2011, humor YouTube channel Slacktory[7] uploaded a haul video supercut. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 27,000 views.



    In 2013 the phenomena was covered by several sites. On December 3rd, 2013, Buzzfeed[8] published an article titled “YouTube Shopper Haul Videos Have More Combined Views Than ‘Gangnam Style’.” The article focused on the boom in haul videos following Black Friday sales. On March 14th, 2013, NPR[9] published an article titled “Showing Off Shopping Sprees, Fashion ‘Haulers’ Cash In Online.” The article focused on retailers partnering with haul creators on YouTube to promote their products.

    Parodies

    On November 19th, 2011, YouTuber sawyerhartman[5] uploaded a video titled “JUICYSPOOF07 – MACHAUL ! (A beauty guru parody),” (below, left) which specifically parodies original haul creator juicystar07. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 690,000 views. On December 26th, 2006, YouTuber lohanthony[6] uploaded a video titled “CVSHAUL (PARODY),” which pokes fun at hauls by featuring basic drugstore purchases. As of April 2014, the video has gained over 380,000 views.



    Notable Videos



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/29/14--16:50: Not All Men Are Like That
  • [Work in progress]

    About

    “Not All Men Are Like That” (NAMALT) is an expression often used in response to generalized statements about men to emphasize individual differences.

    Origin

    The exact origin of the phrase “not all men are like that” is unclear. One of the earliest known uses of the phrase as a rebuttal was posted by several Puerto Rico[1] Forums members in response to a post titled “Why can’t men accept when its over?”

    Spread

    On March 18th, 2014, a post titled "I don’t care if ‘not all men are like that’. On March 26th, Twitter user Ann Boobus posted a tweet featuring a photoshopped comic of the Kool Aid Man with the speech bubble reading “not all men.”




    On April 28th, Time[3] published an article titled “Not All Men: A Brief History of Every Dude’s Favorite Argument,” which

    Notable Examples

    Related Term: NAWALT

    The term “not all women are like that” (NAWALT) is often used in a similar fashion to discourage generalizations about women.

    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/29/14--23:11: Space
  • About

    Space, also referred to as outer space, is the region of the universe beyond Earth’s atmosphere. Since the human discovery of the Solar System in the 17th century, space has long been a subject of scientific studies, artistic representation and fascination for the general public, all of which have seen great advancements with the advent of the Internet.

    History

    NASA Science Internet

    The online history of outer space as a research discussion topic dates back to the mid-1980s with the development of the NASA Science Network (NSN) by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), one of the early applications of the Internet Protocol that connected space researchers to data and information stored anywhere in the world for the first time. In 1989, the NSN evolved into NASA Science Internet (NSI), the first multiprotocol wide area network that could provide completely integrated communications to over 20,000 scientists within the NASA scientific community.

    Mars Pathfinder (1997)

    The Mars Pathfinder was an exploration probe launched on December 4th, 1996. On July 4th, 1997, the probe landed on the planet’s Chryse Planitia region to conduct experiments on the surface. MSNBC published an article titled “Internet Users Follow Mars Missions”, which reported that NASA was struggling to cope with Internet traffic after the Pathfinder reached the surface of Mars on July 4th. The NASA Pathfinder website received several awards, including 1998 Best of the Net, Los Angeles Times 1997 Pick, Cool Site of the Day and Family Site of the Day. On July 14th, the Los Angeles Times published an article titled “Millions Visit Mars -- on the Internet”, which reported that the network of mirror sites hosting information about the probe average about 40 to 45 million hits a day.

    Online Presence

    NASA

    External References

    [1]Wikipedia – Outer space


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  • 04/30/14--03:59: VG Cats

  • About

    VG Cats is a webcomic series hosted on vgcats.com, written and illustrated by Scott Ramsoomair. The series mainly focuses on the two feline protagonists known as Leo( full name- Leo Leonardo, The Third) and Ares. Though, many other characters are used for situational humor. The series mostly parodies video games but can often branch off into other forms of pop culture, parodying everything from movies, tv shows, internet phenomenon, and even anime.


    History


    According to Wikipedia, Scott began drawing the series due to boredom at work. The first VG Cats strip was released on September 1, 2001. Prior to taking the VGCats.com domain, the comic was hosted at www.vgcats.cjb.net. In 2006, Ramsoomair made a strip depicting creatures from Maxis’ video game Spore, and Maxis created a version of the strip replacing all the drawn characters with in-game versions, and sent him custom figurines of the creatures.



    Highlights


    VG Cats has been nominated for several Web Cartoonists’ Choice Awards, winning 2 awards in 2005 and 1 in 2006. Including outstanding use of color and Outstanding Gaming Comic.



    Notable Images





    Search Interest



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    About

    Children’s Coloring Book Parodies refers to both humorous coloring books purposefully created for adults with adult themes and pages from real children’s coloring books with unintentional inappropriate content highlighted or added.

    Origin

    On June 24th, 2009, The King of Crayon[1], a blog made of up pages from children’s coloring books colored in in a way that makes them more violent or funny than originally intended, posted its first picture.



    Spread

    On August 27th, 2010, popular YouTube musician Molly Lewis[3] tweeted a series of pages from a dinosaur coloring book that she colored in and captioned to portray the dinosaurs as hipsters. The collection of pictures was covered by several websites such as UpRoxx[2] and Geekosystem.[4]



    In 2011 and 2012 pop culture and adult themed coloring books, which were published as print books but whose scanned and uploaded pages spread through the web, became popular. On September 15th, 2011, 90s pop culture-themed Colour Me Good 90s[16] (below, right) was published. The book was featured on The Guardian[17]. On October 30th, 2012, Coloring for Grown-Ups: The Adult Activity Book[9] (below, center), a coloring book featuring adult situations like finding an apartment or dealing with a one night stand, was published. The book was featured on The Huffington Post[12] and Complex.[13] On July 15th, 2012[10], Colour Me Good Ryan Gosling (below, left), was published. The book were featured on Buzzfeed[11] and Paste.[14]



    The trend continued in 2013 with the publication of attractive male celebrity themed Color Me Swoon: The Beefcake Activity Book for Good Color-Inners as well as Beginners[15] and Bun B’s Rapper Coloring and Activity Book.[18]

    On March 17th, 2014, the blog Coloring Book Corruptions[5], which features pages from children’s coloring books colored in to become NSFW, posted its first picture. A photoset of edited coloring book pages taken from the blog reached the front page of Reddit[8] on April 14th, 2014. The blog was covered by several sites including The Laughing Squid[6] and Smosh.[7]



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/30/14--10:32: Gratata
  • About

    “Gratata” is an onomatopoeia for the sound produced by a fully automatic firearm which is often mocked by users of the video-sharing site Vine.

    Origin

    On April 10th, 2014, Viner Bryan Silva posted a mirror-shot selfie video in which he recites threatening rap lyrics that ends with the “gratata” sound effect while standing in the bathroom in his underwear (shown below, left). On the following day, Silva posted a second video featuring the onomatopoeia accompanied by a gun shot hand gesture (shown below, right). Within 20 days, the videos gained over 49,000 and 146,000 revines respectively.



    Spread

    On April 16th, the @GratataEdits Twitter feed was launched, featuring photoshopped pictures of Silva.




    On April 18th, Viner Nam Tran posted a parody mocking Silva’s gratata videos, which gathered more than 23,000 revines and 17,000 likes in the next two weeks (shown below).



    On April 20th, YouTuber Vines Compilations posted a compilation of notable “gratata” Vine videos, garnering upwards of 197,000 views and 90 comments in the next 10 days. (shown below).



    On April 24th, Soundcloud user WhoIsSizzle posted a rap song titled "#Gratata (part 1), featuring vocals by Silva (shown below). In one week, the track accumulated more than 22,600 plays and 1,000 likes in one week.



    On April 26th, a post questioning the meaning of “gratata” was submitted to the /r/OutOfTheLoop[1] subreddit, where several users cited Silva’s gratata Vine videos as the original of the phrase. On the same day, Urban Dictionary user Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaak submitted an entry for “gratata,” defining it as “a term used to represent gunshots.” On April 28th, Viner Klarity posted a parody video containing several short sketches mocking the “gratata” onomatopoeia, which gained over 135,000 revines and 92,000 likes in the first 48 hours (shown below).



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 04/30/14--12:03: Why You Heff to be Mad?
  • About

    *"Why You Heff to be Mad?" is a memorable quote said by Russian professional ice hockey goaltender Ilya Bryzagalov in response to a journalist’s question about his fellow Anaheim Ducks teammate Chris Pronger during a post-game interview in 2006.

    Origin

    In 2006, Ilya Bryzagalov, the goaltender for the National Hockey League’s Anaheim Ducks at the time, participated in a post-game interview with the Canadian sports news outlet The Score. During the interview, the reporter asked the athlete how he felt about his fellow teammate Chris Pronger who joined the Anaheim Ducks after a controversial departure from the Edmonton Oilers, to which Bryzagalov responded:



    “That’s a hockey, ya know? It’s only game. Why you have to be mad? He’s a good guy. He may be tired to live here because here is a November month is a -32. Could you imagine? It’s a eight months and eight months and a year snow.”

    On December 18th, YouTuber greyszee uploaded the interview clip in which Bryzagalov incredulously asks the question “why you have to be mad?” in a Russian accent. In the following seven years, the video gained over 900,000 views and 1,400 comments.

    Spread

    On December 1st, 2007, The Chicago Maroon[5] student newspaper highlighted the video in a blog post titled “Why you have to be mad? It’s a hockey.” The clip remained relatively unknown until June 23rd, 2011, when HF Boards[4] member Mosetter27 posted the video in a thread requesting an explanation of Bryzgalov’s statements. On November 10th, YouTuber meRyanP[1] reuploaded the clip, gaining over 2.6 million views and 2,600 comments in the next three years. On February 23rd, 2012, YouTuber Emil Axelsson uploaded a video titled “EA Sports, it’s only a game!,” which featured an animated logo for the video game company EA Sports followed by the Bryzagalov clip (shown below, left). On August 6th, YouTuber tjeaton2405 posted a dubstep remix of the Bryzagalov clip (shown below, right).



    On June 12th, Redditor Kablooey88 submitted YouTuber RyanP’s upload of the video to the /r/youtubehaiku[3] subreddit, where it gathered upwards of 1,700 upvotes and 25 comments. On September 14th, a Facebook[2] page titled “It’s only game, why you heff to be mad?” was launched.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/01/14--00:26: Wreck-It Ralph
  • This Entry is Work in Process feel Free for the Editorship


    About

    Wreck-It Ralph is a family computer animated film was About a Villain named Wreck-It Ralph that he was rebels against his role and dreams of becoming a hero. He travels between games in the arcade, and ultimately must eliminate a dire threat that could affect the entire arcade, and one that Ralph himself inadvertently started[1].

    History



    John Lasseter, the head of Walt Disney Animation Studios and executive producer of the film, describes Wreck-It Ralph as “an 8-bit video-game bad guy who travels the length of the arcade to prove that he’s a good guy.”[2]. In a manner similar to Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the Toy Story films, Wreck-It Ralph featured cameo appearances by a number of licensed video-game characters. For example, one scene from the film shows Ralph attending a support group for the arcade’s various villain characters, including Clyde from Pac-Man, Doctor Eggman from Sonic the Hedgehog, and Bowser from Super Mario Bros[3]. Rich Moore, the film’s director, had determined that for a film about a video-game world to feel authentic, “it had to have real characters from real games in it.”

    Characters

    Wreck-It Ralph



    Wreck-It Ralph (simply known as Ralph) is the main protagonist. Ralph is a heavy-handed “wrecking riot” with a heart. For 30 years, he’s been doing his job as the bad guy in the arcade game Fix-It Felix, Jr. But it’s getting harder and harder to love his job when no one seems to like him for doing it. Suffering from a classic case of “bad guy fatigue” and hungry for a little “wreck-ognition”, Ralph embarks on a wild adventure across an incredible arcade-game universe to prove that just because he’s a bad guy doesn’t mean he’s a “bad guy.”

    Vanellope von Schweetz



    President Vanellope von Schweetz was the central character of the video game Sugar Rush. Not only was she the lead character, she was also the world’s princess. However, at some point, an old racing video game character named Turbo, hijacked Sugar Rush, turned himself into a character named King Candy, and tried to delete Vanellope’s code (but couldn’t), turning her into a glitch. Once Vanellope became a glitch, King Candy was free to rule the kingdom, having all the inhabitants of Sugar Rush’s memories of Princess Vanellope locked away. However, if Vanellope was to ever cross the finish line in an official race, her codes will be restored and the throne will be hers once more. To prevent this from occurring, King Candy, with the help of his minion, and Vanellope’s former assistant, Sour Bill, had the citizens of the game believe having a glitch race could lead to the game being unplugged. Due to this lie, Vanellope was repeatedly tormented and ostracized by the game’s citizens, most notably the racers, led by Taffyta Muttonfudge. Vanellope was able to find sanctuary within Diet Cola Mountain, a volcano that towers over the land of Sugar Rush that also homes an unfinished bonus track.

    Fix-It Felix, Jr.



    Fix-It Felix, Jr. is the hero and the titular character of the arcade game Fix-It Felix, Jr., where he saves an apartment building, and its inhabitants, from being destroyed by a hulking man named Wreck-It Ralph. To everyone in Niceland, the town within the game, Felix is the poster boy for goodness. Felix himself is very polite and kind to everyone he meets, even Ralph. According to Ralph at the beginning of the film, Felix’s magic hammer was given to him by his father, Fix-It Felix, Sr. The hammer has the ability to fix anything and everything, and can even heal an injured character.

    Sergeant Calhoun



    Sergeant Tamora Jean or T.J Calhoun serves as the non-playable protagonist in her first-person shooter arcade game Hero’s Duty, the newest arcade game in Litwak’s Arcade. According to her cohort, Kohut, Calhoun has been programmed with the “most tragic back story ever.” On the day of her wedding to her true love Dr. Brad Scott, Calhoun forgot to complete one of her highly important perimeter checks. As a result, a Cy-Bug breaks into the wedding chapel as they’re exchanging their vows and devours Brad, Calhoun screaming in anguish as she opened fire on the monster. The tragedy left Calhoun with a hardened heart and bitter outlook on life. Fortunately, her now-husband Felix manages to change her back into a very sweet and loving woman.

    King Candy/Turbo



    Left: King Candy | Right: Turbo

    King Candy was originally known as Turbo, a video game character from an old unplugged racing game called TurboTime. He was considered an extremely popular racer that loved the attention from players, but when a new racing game called RoadBlasters got plugged in, that game got more attention than Turbo. Being jealous, Turbo abandoned his own game and decided to take over the new one, and as a result, he ended up causing both the new racing game and his own, to become unplugged for good. His actions were nicknamed “Game-jumping” and “going Turbo,” which was something that the video game characters were encouraged not to do (as dying in a game that a character is not native to results in their permanent death, and even worse abandoning his game and trying to take over another resulted in both being shut down), which is something that Ralph does later to try to become a good guy. Unbeknown to anyone, Turbo actually somehow escaped his game before it was unplugged, and thus escaped termination. He remained dormant until years later, where he hijacked Sugar Rush and turned himself into King Candy, with the aid of Sour Bill. He then began to tamper with the game’s codes by trying to delete Princess Vanellope’s code, but instead this turned her into a glitch. With Vanellope now a glitch, King Candy was free to rule the candy kingdom.

    Reception

    Wreck-It Ralph received generally positive reviews from critics. The review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes reports that 86% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 163 reviews, with an average score of 7.4/10. The site’s consensus reads: “Equally entertaining for both kids and parents old enough to catch the references, Wreck-It Ralph is a clever, colorful adventure built on familiar themes and joyful nostalgia.”[4] At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 72 based on 36 reviews, indicating “generally favorable reviews” [5]. The film earned an “A” from audiences polled by CinemaScore [6].

    Fandom





    Search Interest




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  • 05/01/14--08:57: The Science Side of Tumblr
  • About

    The Science Side of Tumblr is a slang expression used on the popular microblogging site to request a scientific explanation for an inexplicable phenomenon from the scientifically literate population within the community. However, due to its increasingly indiscriminate usage by the userbase at large, the term has since become more closely associated with the concept of troll science.

    Origin

    The earliest known reference to the phrase can be found on the eponymous Tumblr blog The Science Side of Tumblr, blog [3] which was launched on April 9th, 2013 with a GIF post calling on the “science side of Tumblr” to explain the phenomenon of a slowly freezing soap bubble (shown below). Within its first year, the post gained more than 520,000 notes.



    Spread

    References to the science side of Tumblr collected slowly in 2013, with dunkindont’s[5] post featuring a dog scientist, which was posted on November 11th, 2013, gaining over 22,000 notes and marauders4evr’s[4] post on 3D geometrical GIFs, which was posted on August 14th, 2013, gaining over 100 notes as of April 2014.



    Sometimes questions posed to the science side of Tumblr are asked in jest, like robocozz’s[6] post which asks, “quick science side of tumblr why am i ugly,” and zofia-and-sloths’[10] post which asks, “science side of tumblr why does nobody love me?” Both posts where published on December 29th, 2013, with robocozz’s post gaining over 72,000 notes and zofia-and-sloths’ post gaining over 17,000 notes as of April 2014.

    The Tumblr blog The-Science-Side-of-Tumblr[1], which collects images and GIFs with explanations from the science side of Tumblr, published its first post on January 11th, 2014.

    In 2014, there were more than seven unique instances of posts which referenced the science side of Tumblr that accrued at least 1,000 notes including social-justice-wario’s[7] post on memes, 2000yr’s[8] post questioning the existence of the science side of Tumblr and skinjacket’s[9] post on an animated dancing whale.

    The first Urban Dictionary[2] entry for the Science Side of Tumblr was submitted on February 14th, 2014, by user Star Stuff who defined it as:

    “a small part of tumblr made up of intellectuals that doesn’t spend their time obsessing over fandoms or bands and instead tries to keep themselves scientifically literate by reading scientific articles and wants every body to be educated and care about science.”


    Notable Examples



    Search Interest



    External References

    [1]Tumblr – The Science Side of Tumblr

    [2]Urban Dictionary – Science Side of Tumblr

    [3]Tumblr – thesciencesideoftumbir

    [4]Tumblr – marauders4evr

    [5]Tumblr – dunkindont

    [6]Tumblr – robocozz

    [7]Tumblr – social-justice-wario

    [8]Tumblr – 2000yr

    [9]Tumblr – skinjacket

    [10]Tumblr – zofia-and-sloths


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  • 05/01/14--09:58: Upworthy
  • About

    Upworthy is a viral content site which focuses on highlighting news stories and media that address some of the more serious discussion topics on the Internet, including a wide range of social justice-related issues like racism, gender relations and economic inequality. Since its launch in 2012, the site has been credited with popularizing the two-phrase headline style, which has been widely criticized for its sensationalist and formulaic nature.

    History

    Upworthy was launched on March 26th, 2012 by former MoveOn.org executive director Eli Pariser and former managing editor of The Onion Peter Koechley. That day, Pariser and Koechley shared the site’s mission statement in their first post titled “Could This Be The Most Upworthy Site In The History Of The Internet?”,[3] stating their goal to spread “important” and “meaningful” content on the web. The mission statement was also accompanied by a humorous infographic visualizing different types of viral content on the Internet (shown below, left) and a Venn diagram illustrating the type of content Upworthy aimed to focus on (shown below, right).



    On October 16th, 2012, Upworthy announced they had raised $4 million in funding from the venture captial firm New Enterprise Associates and a collection of angel investors, including BuzzFeed co-founder John Johnson, Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes and Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

    Highlights

    ClickHole Parody Site

    On April 29th, 2014, The Onion announced plans to launch a parody of viral content websites like Upworthy and BuzzFeed named “ClickHole”[2] in June of that year. As of May 2014, the website contains an infographic image with instructions on how to click on links within a web browser (shown below) directly above a clickable “Click Me!” button with a live-updated counter.



    Criticism

    Upworthy is often criticized for using formulaic, hyperbolic and sensational headlines referred to as “clickbait” to increase viewership. On December 5th, Upworthy[6] published a blog post defending its headline style, arguing that Upworthy traffic is driven by sharing and posting quality content.



    Related Memes

    Upworthy Headlines

    Upworthy Headlines are parody titles that mock those used for content highlighted on Upworthy, which often consist of two phrases with sensational and hyperbolic statements.



    Traffic

    On June 7th, 2013, the business news site Fast Company[5] published an article declaring Upworthy the “fastest growing media site of all time,” citing its rapid growth to 8.7 million monthly unique visitors within the first six months. In November, the traffic analytics service Quantcast[4] reported that Upworthy had reached nearly 90 million people worldwide. Following changes to Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm in December, Upworthy visitors plummeted 46% within two months. As of May 2014, Upworthy has a Quantcast United States ranking of 38, reaching nearly 40 million people worldwide.



    Search Interest

    External References


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  • 05/01/14--13:12: Jon Laojie
  • About

    Jon Lajoie is a French-Canadian comedian known for his portrayal of the character Taco MacArthur on the FX comedy television show The League and for his YouTube channel featuring comedy sketches and music videos, including “Show Me Your Genitals,” “I Kill People” and the “2 Girls 1 Cup Song”.

    Career

    Beginning in 2003, Lajoie was cast as the English-Canadian musician Thomas Edison in the French-Canadian sitcom L’Auberge du chien noir. In 2009, LaJoie was cast as the character Taco MacArthur in the sitcom The League (shown below, left). On March 5th, 2010, he performed standup comedy routine in an episode of Comedy Central Presents (shown below, right).



    Online History

    On June 11th, 2007, Lajoie uploaded his first YouTube video, in which he portrays a dim-witted Canadian politician named Brent Horse (shown below, left). On November 1st, Lajoie uploaded a music video titled “2 Girls 1 Cup Song,” which described the content of the “2 Girls 1 Cup” shock video as if it were a romantic expression of love (shown below, right). In the first seven years, the videos gathered more than 880,500 views and 12.3 million views respectively.



    On May 31st, 2009, Lajoie uploaded a music video titled “Show Me Your Genitals,” in which he raps about disrespecting and sexually objectifying women (shown below, left). In the following six years, the video gained over 65.7 million views and 114,000 comments. On April 23rd, 2009, Lajoie uploaded a video titled “I Kill People,” in which he unconvincingly raps about how he murders people in the streets, accumulating more than 31 million views and 73,000 comments in five years (shown below, right).



    On March 26th, 2010, LaJoie posted a song about seeing men masturbating on the video chatting site Chatroulette (shown below, left). In four years, the video gained over 3.4 million views and 5,400 comments. On February 11th, 2011, Lajoie released a music video titled “Super Famous,” in which his recurring rap character rhymes about having immense fame and wealth, which gathered more than 6.5 million views and 16,300 comments in three years (shown below, right).



    On February 15th, 2012, Lajoie released a parody commercial for a dating service, in which a couple describes how they conceived a baby in a drunken stupor (shown below, left). In two years, the video reached upwards of 3.06 million views and 5,200 comments. On May 28th, 2013, Lajoie uploaded a Kickstarter parody video, in which he asks viewers to help him raise $500 million so he can be “super rich.”



    On April 30th, 2014, LaJoie uploaded a music video titled “Please Use This Song,” which pleads for companies and organizations to use the song in television advertisements due to a dwindling music industry (shown below). Within 24 hours, the video gathered upwards of 525,000 views and 1,500 comments.



    Social Media Accounts

    As of May 2014, Lajoie has gained over 395,000 likes on Facebook[1] and 210,000 followers on Twitter.[2]

    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Facebook – Jon Lajoie

    [2]Twitter – @JonLajoieComedy


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  • 05/01/14--22:59: Alien
  • This entry is a work in progress

    About

    Alien is a 1979 American science-fiction horror film directed by Ridley Scott. It is called a science fiction movie because the story takes place in outer space, and there are alien creatures called Facehuggers.

    History

    A highly aggressive and intelligent extraterrestrial attacks and hurts the crew of the spaceship Nostromo. The movie stars Sigourney Weaver as Ellen Ripley, Tom Skerritt as Captain Dallas, and Ian Holm as Ash.

    Reception

    Alien was a box office success . It led to a successful Hollywood franchise of books, video games, merchandise, and three official sequels . Along with launching the career of actress Sigourney Weaver, the movie is credited as being the first action movie to have a strong female heroine.

    Fandom

    Alien has a large fandom on parts of the internet.


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