Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

New entries added to the Internet Meme Database

older | 1 | .... | 95 | 96 | (Page 97) | 98 | 99 | .... | 202 | newer

    0 0
  • 05/02/14--08:50: WeNeedDiverseBooks
  • Overview

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks is a hashtag campaign launched by a group of American writers and activists to raise awareness of the lack of diversity in children’s and youth literature, as well as to encourage readers to diversify their personal collections with books featuring characters of different races, genders, sexual orientations and abilities.

    Background

    On April 26th, 2014, the Tumblr blog WeNeedDiverseBooks[1] was launched by young adult author Ellen Oh and other diversity advocates. According to its announcement post, the campaign was inspired by increased news media coverage of the lack of diversity in the children’s book industry, citing the New York Times[15] op-ed “Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books?” and CNN’s[16] op-ed “’Where’s the African-American Harry Potter or the Mexican Katniss?’” which were published in March and April, respectively.



    The post also instructed its supporters to bring further attention to the issue by participating in a three day campaign from May 1st to May 3rd. On May 1st, supporters would participate in a visual campaign by posting images using the hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks on social media platforms like Twitter and Tumblr. On May 2nd, the focus would move to Twitter with further discussions based on the same hashtag, and on May 3rd, the campaign asks that people buy diverse children’s books as a way to “Diversify Your Shelves.” In less than a week, the post gained over 6,000 notes.

    Notable Developments

    Twitter Reaction

    Though the campaign didn’t officially launch until May 1st, supporters began using the hashtag as soon as it was announced on April 26th. Many New York Times bestselling children’s and young adult authors tweeted out the hashtag including Gayle Foreman[3], Rainbow Rowell[4], Neil Gaiman[5] and Jenny Han.[6]



    The hashtag #weneeddiversebooks[2] was tweeted out over 64,000 times in the week following the announcement of the campaign. As of May 2nd, the official Twitter account[7] for WeNeedDiverseBooks has over 1,000 followers. On May 2nd, in support of the campaign literary agent Michelle Witte[11] introduced the hashtag #diversitywl so agents and editors could tweet out the kind of diverse stories they’re looking for.

    Media Coverage

    On April 30th, 2014, book site BookRiot[12] published a post titled “Jump into the #WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign, Help Change the World,” which explained the campaign. On May 1st, Slate[9] published a post titled “#WeNeedDiverseBooks Goes Viral,” which focused on the campaign’s popularity and spread. On May 2nd, Buzzfeed[8] posted a collection of photos focused on kids (shown below) from the WeNeedDiverseBooks Tumblr titled “18 Adorable Reasons We Need More Diverse Books.”



    Other sites that covered the campaign include Bustle[10], Racialicious[13], and School Library Journal.[14]

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/02/14--08:54: #johning
  • About

    #Johning is a Twitter based photo fad that involves posing for a picture while lying on the floor with one’s legs over the footboard of a bed and a laptop on the stomach. It is a parody of a photograph of young adult author and vlogger John Green published by Hollywood Reporter in May 2014.

    Origin

    On May 1st, 2014, The Hollywood Report[1] published an article titled “‘Fault in Our Stars’ Author John Green: Why He’s ‘Freaking Out’ About Hollywood Success,” which featured a photo of Green lying on the floor with his legs resting on a bed and his laptop on his stomach.



    The same day popular YouTube vlogger Charlie McDonnell[2] tweeted a picture featuring him striking the same pose with the hashtag #Johning.




    In less than 24 hours the tweet gained over 1,000 retweets and over 6,000 favorites.

    Spread

    On May 1st, 2014, Hank Green, John Green’s brother and co-host of YouTube channel Vlogbrothers, posted a collection of tweeted #Johning photos, as well as one of his own, on his Tumblr blog[4] with the caption:

    “Something just happened on Twitter…be careful while #johnning.


    In less than 24 hours the post gained over 42,000 notes.



    The same day John Green reblogged[5] the post with the caption:

    “When they were taking that picture, I was like, “If you use this, people are going to make fun of me.” But I had no idea it would be so wonderful.”


    On May 2nd, the photo fad was covered by The Daily Dot[6] with a piece titled “This awkward John Green photo is now a full-fledged Twitter meme.” In less than 24 hours the hashtag #Johning[3] was tweeted out over 2,700 times.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/02/14--10:17: Head Slap Prank
  • About

    Head Slap Prank is a practical joke in which an unsuspecting person is slapped in the back of the head by someone sitting directly next to him/her in such a covert way that the victim is unable to correctly identify the slapper. The deceptive element of the joke bears a similarity to that used in the wooden spoon prank.

    Origin

    On June 2nd, 2009, the Internet humor site KeepBusy[1] highlighted a video of a Russian student who is repeatedly slapped in the back of the head by the boy sitting next to him, causing him to jump out of his seat, remove his shirt and slap the student sitting behind him (shown below). In the first five years, the video gained more than 117,000 views and 290 comments.



    Spread

    On June 7th, 2009, YouTuber Alistair Curtis[2] reuploaded the head slap video, receiving over 218,600 views and 140 comments in the next five years. On December 9th, 2009, YouTuber randomdude54321 uploaded a video in which a man runs into a room, slaps a man in the back of the head and exits leaving a third man to take the blame for the slap (shown below).



    On February 18th, 2010, Redditor Cutth submitted an animated GIF version of the Russian student slap, with captions depicting the three students as Al-Qaeda, Iraq and the United States to the /r/politics[3] subreddit (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gathered more than 4,400 upvotes and 560 comments.



    On May 30th, 2012, YouTuber AN Zypp uploaded a video featuring a sleeping student who is repeatedly slapped in the back of the head by the student sitting next to him (shown below). In two years, the video gathered upwards of 1.2 million views and 1,000 comments.



    On February 5th, 2014, Redditor BaconGristle reposted another animated GIF version of the Russian slap video to the /r/WastedGifs[4] subreddit, where it garnered over 2,000 upvotes and 35 comments in two months.

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/02/14--12:26: Nature Valley Anime Tweets
  • Overview

    Nature Valley Anime Tweets are a series of anime-themed messages posted by the official Twitter account for the American grain-snack brand Nature Valley.

    The tweets soon gained popularity, spawning many other parodies, featuring a variety of anime character interacting with the snack bars.

    Background

    On April 27th, 2014, Twitter user @SuperRoyalLand[2] posted a self-deprecative message about buying a Nature Valley granola bar while dreading about his lack of social life at school. On the next morning, @NatureValley,[1] the official Twitter handle for the brand, responded to @SuperRoyalLand’s tweet with a message of encouragement suggesting that he should befriend some of their other followers who have expressed their love for anime.




    Notable Developments

    Then on April 29th, @ER_nut[3] tweeted at @NatureValley asking about their favorite character from the multimedia anime series Love Live! School Idol Project, to which the company responded:




    As of May 2014, the tweet has garnered over 100 retweets and favorites. After the tweets, many different news sites picked up on the story, including Crunchyroll[4], Anime News Network[5] and Anime Herald[6]. The American anime licensing company Funimation also tweeted at the company using their twitter handle @Funimation[7], joking that their Senpai Had Noticed Them.




    On April 30th, the handle retweeted a photoshopped image of the character Kokoro Akemi, from the anime Tantei Opera Milky Holmes, holding two nature valley bars from user @KokoroAkemi[8], adding an invitation for other users to do the same. The tweet received over 600 retweets and over 300 favorites.


    Notable Examples




    External References


    0 0
  • 05/02/14--17:32: I Have Failed You
  • (MAJORWIP. HALPNEEDED.)

    About

    I Have Failed You is an Exploitable meme that depicts a scene from the cartoon Dexter’s Laboratory in which the eponymous character looks up to a poster in his locker and says :I have failed you". Using image editing software, the picture is usually changed to show a character or person who is held in high regard by some groups.

    Origin

    The original scene comes from the episode Season 1 episode “Dexter’s Rival”, in which Dexter looks up to a drawing of Albert Einstein.

    Spread

    As of May 2014, several varieties of the image have been produced, on sites like DeviantArt and FunnyJunk.

    Notable Examples



    0 0
  • 05/03/14--05:32: Jack Douglass/jacksfilms
  • About

    Jack Douglass is a YouTube personality that’s most notable for his Your Grammar Sucks series, his Jackask series, which is a cynical QnA answering genuine or sarcastic questions, and his newest GamerGod88 videos which take Lets Plays as a video sketch form.
    As well as on again, off again. PMS (Parody, Music, Sketch)

    Online History

    Jack first started his YouTube career as many others did, as a hobby. His first video, The Handy Pen, recently has 244, 291 views.
    His later videos may not have the same amount as now, but a “sleeper hit” Currently Jack has 3-4 series going on, along with parodies to tide over his biches until he gets the anticipated video out.
    Jack is also Intern 2 from the MyMusic webshow created by TheFineBros.

    Reception

    Jack has accumulated 1.4 million subscribers, 151k likes on FaceBook, and 248k followers on Twitter.


    0 0
  • 05/03/14--17:00: Damn You Len
  • About

    “Damn You Len” is a tumblr meme that originated on YouTube as a comment by user purplegirlove. “Len” refers to the VOCALOID character Len Kagamine. The original comment reads:

    doctor: what happend to this girl?
    Nurse: she fainted for a mega nosebleed
    Doctor: thats the 5 one to day whats mking them have huge nosebleeds
    Nurse: it from len * thinks about len * *nosebleed *
    Doctor: damn you len




    Origin

    The comment was reposted as a screenshot on tumblr and gained thousands of notes, spawning several derivatives such as “Damn You X” and “Bless You Len” and many image derivatives, as well as its own tumblr tag.


    0 0
  • 05/03/14--21:57: Ninja Sex Party
  • About

    Ninja Sex Party is a comedy band duo that consists of Danny Sexbang (Leigh Daniel Avidan) and Ninja Brian (Brian Wecht). They are most famous for their comedic, sexual music videos along with contributions from many famous internet flash animators.
    The band came into the public eye more when Danny became a member of the YouTube gaming channel Game Grumps replacing former grump Jonathan Jafari.

    History

    Ninja Sex Party started in 2009 after Danny and Brian they were introduced by mutual friends at the Upright Citizen’s Brigade Theatre. The first official Ninja Sex Party music video, “I Just Want To (Dance),” was uploaded onto Youtube on October 22nd, 2009 and as of May 4th 2014 has over 750,000 views.

    They have also performed live at events such as the Women Comedy Festival in 2012.

    So far Ninja Sex Party has released 2 albums, NSFW in 2011 and Strawberries and Cream in 2013, and is currently working on a third album titled Attitude City. As of May 4th, 2014, Ninja Sex Party has over 260,000 subscribers and over 22,000,000 views.

    Music Videos

    Starbomb

    Danny and Brian along with Arin Hanson collaborated on Starbomb, an album that combines the musical style of Ninja Sex Party with the video game comedy of Egoraptor which was released in late 2013 to much praise and sales as well as over 10,000,000 hits on YouTube.


    0 0
  • 05/04/14--23:52: The Wicker Man
  • About

    The Wicker Man is a Horror film was directed by Neil LaBute starring Nicolas Cage and it was been use for a Remake on the 1973 film of the same name. After when the film was released it received mainly negative reviews from film critics.



    Reception

    On Rotten Tomatoes the film was hold in 15% approval rating with 105 reviews[1]. On At the Movies, The Wicker Man received two thumbs down from Richard Roeper and Aisha Tyler. The film garnered five Razzie Award nominations. However Gleiberman saying that director Neil LaBute brought some “innovation” over the original film[2]. Christopher Lee was commented on this Film: “I don’t believe in remakes. You can make a follow up to a film, but to remake a movie with such history and success just doesn’t make sense to me.” [3].

    Related Memes

    NOTTHEBEES!

    NOTTHEBEES! is a Quote that after the end of film Edward is got Torturer by the Bee’s and it will become a Popular Meme and then on YouTube it use this quote was been use for YTPMV’s.

    How’d It Get Burned?

    How’d It Get Burned? is also a Quote when that Edward saw a Burned Doll and then he ask to Sister Willow that he say’s “How’d It Get Burned?, How’d It Get Burned?!”. Like NOTTHEBEES it use for YTPMV’s.

    Search Interest



    External References

    [1]Rotten Tomatoes – The Wicker Man

    [2]Entertainment Weekly – The Wicker Man

    [3]The Free Library – Lee Review The Wicker Man


    0 0
  • 05/05/14--08:47: Sad Kanye
  • About

    Sad Kanye is a photoshop meme similar to Sad Keanu based on an Instagram photograph of the American rapper Kanye West looking morose while sitting on a lawn chair in zip line gear.

    Origin

    On April 30th, 2014, Instagram user and photographer Alex Yenni[1] posted an Instagram photo of a picture he found in a zip-lining office in Mexico[2] which features a smiling Kim Kardashian with Kanye West sitting slightly behind them and looking sad (shown below). The photo’s caption reads:

    “Bumped into Kim. Kanye wasn’t thrilled.”


    In less than a week the photo gained over 100 likes.



    The photograph was most likely taken in July 2012, as suggested by another photograph of West and Kardashian in the same outfits and gear tweeted out by Girls Gone Wild’s Joe Francis[3] on July 31st, 2012 (shown below). The photoshop meme didn’t begin until May 1st, 2014, when Redditor loltatz submitted the picture to the subreddit r/pics[7]. In less than a week, the photo gained over 16,000 upvotes.




    Spread

    On May 2nd, 2014, the original photo was covered by The Huffington Post,[4] followed by roundups of the best examples of the photoshop meme on Death and Taxes[5], Slate[6] and SheKnows.[8] Also on May 2nd, the single topic blog Sad Kanye Doing Stuff[9] was created on Tumblr.



    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/05/14--10:30: Flash Mob Parties
  • Overview

    Flash Mob Parties refer to large-scale social gatherings that are usually hosted at private locations, such as residential homes, and promoted publcly through social media platforms. Due to the overwhelming turnout in attendance, presence of underage drinking and as a result, concerns of public safety, flash mob parties have been often met by police crackdown.

    Background

    On January 12th, 2008, high school student Corey Worthington threw a party while his parents were away at his house in the Narre Warren district of Melbourne, Australia. According to the Australian news site Crikey[1], Worthington publicized the event on the social networking sites Myspace and Facebook, which attracted a crowd of 500 youths who subsequently vandalized the neighborhood. Following the party, Worthington was interviewed by the television news program A Current Affair, in which he famously refused to take off his sunglasses stating they were “famous” (shown below).



    Notable Developments

    May 2010: Kate’s Birthday

    On May 1st, 2010, the birthday party of Australian resident Kate Miller was crashed by over 60,000 attendees after the public Facebook event was posted on several community websites.



    September 2010: William Lashua’s Birthday

    In September 2010, an event flyer for the 90th birthday of Massachusetts resident William Lashua was posted on 4chan, which subsequently spread to various community sites. After finding out about the event’s online circulation, Lashua’s grandson submitted a post to Reddit with instructions on where to send “cards and well wishes.”



    June 2011: Thessa’s Birthday

    On June 3rd, 2011, the 16th birthday party of a teenager named Thessa in Hamburg, Germany was crashed by upwards of 1,600 people who discovered the gathering through a public Facebook event page.[1] 11 people were arrested, one officer was injured and several attendees were hospitalized for alcohol poisoning.



    March 2012: Project X Film

    On March 2nd, 2012, the comedy film Project X was released about a party held by several teenagers that escalates beyond control after being advertised on Craigslist and a local radio station. Following the film’s release, many flash mob parties began adopting the word “Project” for their event titles.



    March 2012: Project M

    On March 8th, 2012, an invite for a party dubbed “Project M” at a foreclosed home in Farmington Hills, Michigan was posted to Twitter by high school student Mike Vasovski, which was subsequently posted as an ad on Craigslist (shown below). The following day, the Detroit news site ABC 7[3] reported that Vasovski was offered a summer internship by the Gawker Media automotive blog Jalopnik for successfully marketing the event.



    September 2012: Project X Haren

    On September 6th, 2012, a 15-year-old girl from Haren, Groningen in the northeastern Netherlands launched a public Facebook event page in which she invited 78 friends to her 16th birthday party to be held on the 21st of that month. One of the invitees invited hundreds of additional Facebook users, which resulted in a total of 16,000 invites sent in the next 48 hours. After the Facebook page was deleted, people began spreading the event information on Twitter with the terms “Project X Merthe,” “Project X Stationsweg” and “Project X Haren”. A new Facebook page for the event was launched titled “Project X Haren,” through which over 30,000 people were invited by September 21st (shown below).



    That day, the family was moved to a secret location as a precautionary safety measure. Later that evening, thousands of people descended upon their street, resulting in riots and vandalism. Additionally, a total of 36 rioters and 15 policemen were injured and an elderly man was assaulted inside his home.



    September 2013: I’m Shmacked Party

    On September 9th, 2013, a promoter for the YouTube series I’m Smacked posted a tweet urging University of Delaware students to retweet the message in order to throw an impromptu tour stop in Newark.




    That evening, thousands of students rioted in the streets after police prevented the event from happening. Newark police reported that students vandalized public property, causing the town to call for reinforcements from across the state.



    April 2014: Deltopia

    On April 5th, 2014, the University of Santa Barbara’s annual springtime party Deltopia turned into a riot following wide-spread promotion of the event on sites like Instagram and Twitter. On the following day, the Internet news site The Daily Dot[6] highlighted several notable tweets, photos and videos of the riots.




    April 2014: #ProjectNat

    On April 11th, 2014, a party was broken up by police is Salem, Oregon, which had reportedly been organized by teenager Nat Gray via Twitter. Prior to the event, the Marion County Sherrif tweeted at Gray warning him that he could face serious consequences for the party.[4]



    March 2014: #MansionParty

    On May 2nd, 2014, a party for a 17-year-old in Ontario, Canada was promoted on social media under the hashtag #MansionParty, which was attended by 2,000 teenagers who caused an estimated $70,000 in damages. Canadian police reportedly broke up the party with 60 squad cars, canine and tactical units after receiving numerous complaints.




    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/05/14--11:41: Could Mozart Be Still Alive?
  • (Work in Progress)


    About

    Could Mozart Still Be Alive? is a question, associated with a conspiracy theory surrounding the whereabouts of a famous Austrian composer, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

    Origin

    The theory originated from an Easter egg found in the first generation Pokemon games for GameBoy (Red, Green, Blue, Yellow). In the games, there are the legendary Pokemon: Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres. By taking first few letters off each of their names, we get the word MOZART (MOltres, Zapdos, ARTicuno).

    Though the Easter Egg had been already known as of September 22nd, 2010[3], the first known instance of the question being used in this context, was on January 30th, 2013, in a Gaia Forums thread[1], about whenever or not the Pokemon games are funded by the German government.

    Spread

    On March 7th, 2013, the earliest known example of a satirical image, featuring various video game Easter eggs, was posted on 4chan’s /a/ board[2]. One of them was about the legendary Pokemon and their connection to Mozart, followed by a question “Could Mozart be still alive?”.



    The question itself is often used as a punchline in various theories, some of them are usually related to Nintendo, and the video games made by them[4].

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/05/14--13:41: Net Neutrality
  • About

    Net Neutrality is a network design principle which advocates Internet service providers (ISPs) to treat all Internet traffic equally in order to maintain an “open Internet.” The principle is in opposition to a “closed Internet” in which providers restrict access to content, filter content or use “traffic shaping”[3] to degrade access to specific web services.

    Origin

    Although the basic concept of net neutrality is often credited with the open access movement and political activist Lawrence Lessig[4] as early as 2001,[2] the term was first coined by Columbia law professor Tim Wu in a 2003 paper titled “Network Neutrality, Broadband Discrimination.”[1] The paper proposed that legislation be drafted to ensure ISPs allow unfettered communication between network applications and Quality of Service (QoS) traffic.

    Spread

    In February 2004, United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chairman Michael Powell announced a list of “Network Freedom” principles, stating that consumers be given four freedoms, including “freedom to access content,” “freedom to run applications,” “freedom to attach devices” and “freedom to obtain service plan information.”[6] On November 8th, 2005, Google[8] published a blog post containing a letter to Congress promoting net neutrality by computer scientist Vinton Cerf.[9]

    Dear Chairman Barton and Ranking Member Dingell,

    I appreciate the inquiries by your staff about my availability to appear before the Committee and to share Google’s views about draft telecommunications legislation and the issues related to “network neutrality.” These are matters of great importance to the Internet and Google welcomes the Committee’s hard work and attention. The hearing unfortunately conflicts with another obligation, and I am sorry I will not be able to attend. (Along with my colleague Robert Kahn, I am honored to be receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Wednesday at the White House for our work in creating the Internet protocol TCP/IP.)

    In April 2006, the Save the Internet[5] online activist organization was formed by the Free Press advocacy group, which includes a coalition of businesses and non-profit organizations aiming to protect net neutrality with a proposed “First Amendment” for Internet rights. On May 11th, YouTuber Ask A Ninja posted a video in which a man dressed in a ninja costume humorously explains the basics of net neutrality, gathering more than 1.1 million views and 600 comments in eight years (shown below, left). On June 5th, the YouTube channel Politicstv uploaded a video titled “Save the Internets,” in which the electronic musician Moby attempts to confront uninterested people on the street about net neutrality (shown below, right).



    On November 5th, 2007, the Net Neutrality Squad[10] activist group was formed to enlist Internet users to report any actions by ISPs deemed threatening to net neutrality. On November 14th, president Barack Obama gave an address at Google announcing his commitment to preserving network neutrality (shown below, left). On June 8th, 2008, YouTuber AtheneWins uploaded a video promoting the protection of net neutrality, gaining upwards of 3.06 million views and 4,200 comments in the first four years (shown below, right).



    On September 30th, 2009, the /r/netneutrality[11] subreddit was launched for discussions related to the controversial topic. On December 22nd, 2010, designer Mike Ciarlo[12] created the website The Open Internet,[13] containing an animated presentation arguing the case for net neutrality. Two days later, Redditor rednightmare submitted the site to the /r/technology[14] subreddit, where it gathered over 2,500 upvotes and 370 comments prior to being archived.



    On September 23rd, 2011, the FCC released rules stating that ISPs must disclose all network management practices, refrain from blocking any lawful content or discriminate in transmitting lawful network traffic.[15] On April 3rd, 2013, the website WhatIsNetNeutrality.org[16] was created, which contains an interactive timeline outlining the history of net neutrality.

    FCC Announces Proposed Internet “Fast Lane”

    On April 23rd, 2014, the FCC announced their proposal to change net neutrality rules to allow content companies to pay Internet service providers for special “fast lanes” that would deliver content at increased speeds.[17] The following day, a petition was created on the White House website We the People[19] urging the Obama administration to reject the FCC’s plans to allow preferential treatment to content providers (shown below).



    On May 3rd, Redditor dydorn submitted a post urging viewers to sign the petition and contact the FCC to fight the “fast lane” proposal to /r/technology,[18] where it received upwards of 12,000 upvotes and 560 comments in the first 48 hours. On May 5th, YouTuber CGP Grey uploaded a video titled “Internet Citizens: Defend Net Neutrality,” which explained the basics of net neutrality and urged viewers to contact the FCC to reclassify broadband Internet as a “title II common carrier telecommunications service.” That day, Redditor Igore34 posted the video to the /r/videos[7] subreddit, where it accumulated over 22,100 upvotes and 790 comments within 10 hours.



    Notable Issues

    Data Discrimination

    One of the most frequently debated issues in network neutrality concerns data discrimination, or the selective filtering of information by an Internet service provider. Proponents of the net neutrality assert that one class of customers should not be favored over another in treatment of traffic, as such prioritization would constitute a form of censorship and inequality in access to the Internet.

    Consumer Rights

    Yet another major point of debate in network neutrality addresses the issue of “double-dipping” by network owners, or the act of charging consumers twice for Internet access, at first by charging individual consumers for access to the network and then incurring additional costs by charging the service providers with a separate fee for their Internet access, the burden of which is usually passed onto the consumers in the form of price hikes.

    Innovation

    The issue of innovation has often been brought up in discussions of net neutrality, as proponents of the principle argue that startups and small-time entrepreneurs would have to face higher entry barriers and costs under the framework of tiered-networks, which would ensure big companies and service providers to monopolize the “fast lanes” of the Internet.

    Privacy

    Infringement of privacy has been another growing concern among the proponents of network neutrality. Because the current lack of legal safeguards enables the Internet service providers to directly control a user’s Internet connections and access the devices, some speculate that the profit-driven network providers could easily analyze what their subscribers are viewing and sell that information to the highest bidder.

    Related Memes

    Series of Tubes

    On June 28th, 2006, former Alaskan Senator Ted Stevens told the world, “The internet is not a big truck. It’s a series of tubes,” among other odd choices of wording while trying to criticize an amendment that would have prohibited ISP’s from charging for a tiered Internet structure.



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--09:46: K
  • About

    K is an abbreviation for “okay," an English expression commonly used as an interjection to denote consent, endorsement or acknowledgement. In online conversations and short message communications, the letter “K” can be more specifically interpreted as an indifferent acknowledgement.

    Origin

    While the origin of the letter “K” as a shorthand for “okay” remains unclear, the term most likely entered widespread usage during the onset of online multiplayer games and mobile texting in the early 2000s. On February 27th, 2003, Urban Dictionary[2] user Brian Black submitted an entry for the abbreviation, defining it as a “term of acknowledgement.”



    Spread

    In 2004, Rice University associate professor Suzanne Kemmer posted a list of Internet slang terms on her Words in English[1] website, which included “k” as an abbreviation of “okay.” On March 9th, “k” was listed in a collection of “text messaging and online chat abbreviations” on the online reference site Webopedia.[3] On July 31st, 2006, K was added to the “List of Chat Acronyms & Text Shorthand” on the Internet slang database NetLingo.[5] On April 6th, 2007, About.com[6] published an article about online slang term “kk,” defining it as an abbreviation of the phrase “okay, cool.” On February 7th, 2010, a Facebook[7] page titled "i hate short answers!!!! “k” “ok” “lol” etc" was launched. On August 30th, 2012, a question was submitted to Yahoo Answers[8] asking “what does k mean in texting?”, to which user Kerryn replied that it meant “okay.” On November 5th, 2013, Redditor jesuspunk submitted a GIF of the character Ari Gold from the television series Entourage throwing his phone against the wall titled “MRW my crush replies to my text with ‘k’” to the /r/reactiongifs[9] subreddit (shown below). Prior to being archived, the post gathered over 800 upvotes and 20 comments.



    On December 11th, the /r/K_Gifs[4] subreddit was launched for reaction GIFs captioned with the abbreviation (shown below). In the first six months, the subreddit accumulated more than 1,900 subscribers.


       

    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--10:01: Friends
  • About

    Friends is an American sitcom television series that follows six friends in their twenties and thirties living in New York City. During its decade-long run from 1994 to 2004, the series enjoyed both mainstream success and critical acclaims as one of the most successful sitcoms in television history and its fanbase continued to grow through syndicated airings in the years following its series finale.

    Premise

    Friends follows six friends in their twenties- Rachel Greene (Jennifer Aniston), Monica Geller (Courteney Cox), Phoebe Buffay (Lisa Kudrow), Joey Tribbiani (Matt LeBlanc), Chandler Bing (Matthew Perry) and Ross Geller (David Schwimmer) as they move in and out of relationships and jobs. Threads throughout the series include Monica’s culinary aspirations, Joey’s acting career, Ross and Rachel’s on again, off again relationship, and Phobe’s eccentricity. Throughout the series the six characters live, in varying combinations, in two apartments across the hall from each other.

    History

    Friends[1] premiered on NBC on September 22nd, 1994. It ran for ten seasons, airing its series finale on May 6th, 2004. Reruns of the series began airing on Nick at Nite in 2011.

    Joey Spinoff

    Joey, a Friends spinoff which followed Joey (Matt LeBlanc) to LA to pursue acting, premiered on NBC on September 9th, 2004. The series was renewed for a second season, and though the entire season was shot only 14 episodes aired, the last airing on March 7th, 2006.



    Reception

    Friends earned a rating of 9 on IMDB and a score of 59 on Metacritic[3]. It was nominated for 10 Golden Globes, winning one in 2003 for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy (Jennifer Aniston). The show also enjoyed a very high viewership. Its series premiere brought in over 21 million viewers[4], while its series finale brought in over 52 million viewers.[5]

    Online Presence

    As of May 2014, the official Friends Facebook Page[6] has gained over 19 million likes. All 236 episodes are available for $1.99 each on the official Warner Brothers Television YouTube channel.[7]



    Fandom

    The oldest Friends fansite predates the show’s official web presence. Friends-TV.org[16] was created shortly after the show began[17], the site’s FAQ page explains:

    “This site first began on a server at Dartmouth University in Fall of 1994, when the show first aired. The internet boom was just getting underway. Neither Warner Bros. nor NBC had web pages dedicated to Friends when the show first began. There was no other Friends site of any kind.”




    Older, now defunct fansites include friendsfan[18] and friendsfansite[19]. Still active Friends fansites include the Friends page of FanPop[9] and the Friends page of Lives in a Box.[11] There are numerous fan-run Tumblr blogs dedicated to the Friends fandom including fffriends[10], fuckyeahfriends[11] and f-r-i-e-n-d-s-confessions.[13] As of May 2014, there are over 4,000 Friends fanfiction submissions on Fanfiction.net[8].



    Related Memes

    Chandler Dances on Things

    Chandler Dances on Things is a GIF animation series of one of the main cast members from Friends, Chandler Bing (played by actor Matthew Perry) dancing awkwardly atop a variety of objects or in humorous contexts.



    Smelly Cat

    “Smelly Cat,” is a song written and performed by Friends character Phobe (Lisa Kudrow). The song first appeared in an episode titled “The One With The Baby On The Bus,”[14] which first aired on November 2nd, 1995. The music video created for the song appeared in an episode titled “The One Where Eddie Moves In,” which first aired on February 22nd, 1996. On March 16th, 2007, YouTuber lpss[15] uploaded that music video to YouTube. As of May 2014, the video has gained over 2.4 million views.



    External References

    [1]IMBDFriends

    [2]IMDBJoey

    [3]MetaCritic – Friends

    [4]Anything Kiss – Nielson Ratings

    [5]New Music and More – Nielson Ratings

    [6]Facebook – Friends

    [7]YouTube – Warner Bros Television

    [8]Fanfiction.net – Friends

    [9]Fanpop – Friends

    [10]Tumblr – fffriends

    [11]Lives in a Box – Friends

    [12]Tumblr – fuckyeahfriends

    [13]Tumblr – f-r-i-e-n-d-s-confessions

    [14]Friends Wikia – Smelly Cat

    [15]YouTube – lpss

    [16]Friends – friends-tv

    [17]Buzzfeed – 8 Hilariously Old ’90s Fan Sites

    [18]FriendsFan – friendsfan

    [19]Friends Fan Site – friendsfansite


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--11:52: Shovel Fight
  • Overview

    Shovel Fight Video refers to an amateur recording which shows a teenage girl striking another girl in the back of her head with a shovel during a physical brawl. As with previous “fight videos” that have gone viral on the Internet, the footage spawned a number of remix videos after it began circulating on Vine in early May 2014.

    Background

    On May 4th, 2014, Viner Josh Officer posted a video clip of a girl being hit in the head with a shovel as she retreats from another teenage girl’s porch (shown below). In the next 48 hours, the video garnered upwards of 510,000 tweets, 75,000 revines and 73,0000 likes.



    Notable Developments

    Online Reaction

    On May 5th, 2014, YouTuber gumbo uploaded an extended version of the video, showing the girls engaging in a fist fight prior to the shovel being thrown (shown below). When one of the girl’s retreats to her home in order to retrieve a “BB gun,” she is pursued to her front porch by her rival. In retaliation, she grabs and shovel and hits her opponent in the head. Within 24 hours, the video gained over 1.05 million views before being removed from the site.



    The same day, the video was reposted to Worldstar Hiphop,[2] where it received upwards of 2.3 million views and 8,200 comments in 24 hours. Also on May 5th, Redditor radrico submitted the video to the /r/videos[1] subreddit, where it gathered more than 6,200 upvotes and 2,100 comments that day. Additionally, the video was reposted to the /r/amateurfights[5] and /r/streetfights[6] subreddits.

    Vine Parodies

    On May 5th, Viner Zachary Butler posted an edited version of the Vine clip, featuring the 2012 hip hop song “M.A.A.D City” by Kendrick Lamar (shown below, left). In 24 hours, the video gained over 197,000 likes and 181,000 revines. The same day, Viner Music Don’t Match posted a mashup of a yeet dance video combined with the shovel fight (shown below, right).



    Identity of Victim

    On May 5th, Twitter user Miranda Lynn[3] tweeted at Worldstar Hip Hop identifying herself as the girl who was hit in the head with the shovel. That day, the sports blog Larry Brown Sports[4] highlighted several notable tweets from her feed and included a link to her Facebook page. As of May 6th, her Twitter account has been suspended.



    Death Hoax

    That same day, the hashtag #RIPShovelFightGirl began circulating on Twitter, accompanied with a fake news story reporting that Lynn had died after the fight due to complications from head injuries sustained from the shovel blow.[11]

    Miranda Fugate died of serious head injuries after being hit with a shovel in the head by an old friend of hers named Emily Powers. The whole thing was caught on video and posted all over the internet and generated around 500,000 video views in just 2 days. In the video, the two girls begin fist fighting outside Emily’s house for a few seconds before Emily threatened to go inside her house and bring out an air soft gun which shoots plastic BB’s, when Miranda suddenly charged at Emily, Emily grabbed a nearby shovel and “cracked” Miranda in the dome. If you haven’t seen the video, watch the video below: At first, It only seemed like a minor head injury as Miranda also temporarily lost one ear’s hearing. Suddenly, while watching ‘Mean Girls’ at home that same day, Miranda collapsed and died instantly. Doctors are saying she died of severe head trauma. “She was a good girl” Miranda’s mother cried to reporters, “I mean, she was sort of a bully, but she did not deserve to get molly whooped like that, especially with a shovel right to the head”. Emily will not be charged with second degree murder but instead man-slaughter as she was only protecting herself, and succeeded.

    Viner Josh Officer subsequently posted a new Vine video in which Lynn reveals that she is alive and is “doing alright” (shown below).



    News Media Coverage

    On May 5th, several news sites published articles about the video, including Deadspin,[7] The Huffington Post,[8] Larry Brown Sports,[4] Guyism[9] and MStarz News.[10]

    Search Interest

    Not available.

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--13:16: #BringBackOurGirls
  • About

    #BringBackOurGirls is a hashtag campaign launched by a group of Nigerians to raise awareness and call others to action after over 300 Nigerian school girls were kidnapped by a terrorist group on April 15th, 2014.

    Background

    On April 15th, 2014, a group of over 300 Nigerian girls were kidnapped from the Chibok Government Girls Secondary School.[1] As of May 2014, a little over 50 girls have escaped their kidnappers. A terrorist group called Boko Haram has claimed they are responsible for the kidnapping. Criticism of the Nigerian government’s inaction and Western media’s lack of coverage quickly emerged. The hashtag #BringBackOurGirls originated from Twitter users in Nigeria[8] and was first tweeted out on April 23rd, by lawyer Ibrahim M. Abdullahi[9].



    As of May 4th, more than 40% of the hashtag activity came from the United States. As of May 6th, 2014, the hashtag[3] has been tweeted out over 1.2 million times.

    Notable Developments

    Celebrity Tweets

    On May 3rd, 2014, education and equality activist Malala tweeted a picture from her foundation’s Twitter account[3] of herself holding a sign with the hashtag. In less than a week the tweet gained over 4,000 retweets.



    Other celebrities[7] who tweeted out the hashtag include Hillary Clinton[4], Kerry Washington[5] and Mary J Blige.[6]



    Media Coverage

    On May 4th, Refinery29[10] published a collection of Instagram images that used the hashtag. On May 5th ABC news published an article titled “Twitter Campaign #BringBackOurGirls Takes Off,” which explored how the hashtag’s popularity grew after celebrities tweeted it out. On May 6th, Buzzfeed[11] published a post titled “The Nigerian School Girls Are Still Missing And International Outrage Is Rising,” which collected many of the most powerful tweets which used the hashtag.

    Notable Examples



    Search Interest

    External References


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--15:09: #AddAWord
  • About

    #AddAWord is a type of hashtag-based word games in which an extraneous word must be added into the title of a famous book, film or song to make it sound irreverent or humorously out of its original context.

    Origin

    On October 4th, 2013, Twitter user Joel Watson posted a tweet with the hashtag #AddaWordRuinaMovie, accompanied by the altered film title “Sexual Assault on Precinct 13.”




    Precursor

    Long before the arrival of the hashtag games, there have been numerous internet memes that parody the titles of popular films by either replacing, adding or removing one letter from their original titles, most notably Anagrammed Movie Posters and One Letter Off Movie Posters on Something Awful.

    Spread

    The same day, Twitter user Colleen Hawkings posted an #AddAWordRuinAMovie tweet for “Finding Nemo Dead,” which gathered more than 145 retweets and 120 favorites.




    On October 5th, 2013, the news site Epoch Times[1] highlighted notable examples tweets from the series, including several photoshopped movie posters by Twitter user @darth[2] (shown below).



    On October 7th, the hashtag #AddaWordRuinaChristianBook began circulating on Twitter, containing titles of Christian-themed books with an added word to change its original meaning.




    On March 24th, 2014, the hashtag game #RuinaChildrensBook, which involves adding to the title of a classic children’s book to make it sound unpleasant or distasteful, was launched during the “#HashtagWars” segment of the Comedy Central late night show @midnight (shown below).



    On May 5th, @midnight broadcast a new segment of #HashtagWars, in which contestants drafted examples of tweets for the hashtag “#RuinARapTrack” featuring rap lyrics with added phrases meant to ruin the original meaning (shown below).



    Search Interest

    External References

    [1]Epoch Times – Add a Word Ruin a Movie

    [2]Twitter – @darth


    0 0
  • 05/06/14--18:35: Even Speedwagon Is Afraid!

  • About

    “Even Speedwagon Is Afraid!” is a memorable quote from the long-running manga JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure. The quote is usually used as a source for snowclones.

    Origin

    The line originally appeared in Chapter 13 of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood, “Immortal Monster”.[1] The chapter featured the revival of Dio Brando, who had been shot dead two chapters prior. Dio, having turned himself into a vampire, drains the blood of several nearby police officers to regain his strength. While lead protagonist Jonathan Joestar is quick to surmise the nature of Dio’s power, supporting character Robert Edward O. Speedwagon is left in awe, which is denoted by a text bubble.


    Spread

    On February 3rd, 2013, Facebook user Non Sense From Nowhere made a photo album for parodies of the quote.[2] As an April Fool’s prank for 2014,4Chan founder moot included the phrase as a CAPTCHA code for the website’s Anime message board (shown below).



    The quote had also spawned several derivative images, featuring Robert Edward O. Speedwagon or some other character, sometimes from an entirely different franchise, expressing some sort of emotion.

    Notable Examples


    Search Interest


    External References

    [1]JoJo’s Bizarre Encyclopedia – Immortal Monster.

    [2]Facebook – ‘Even Speedwagon Is Afraid!’ Photo Album.


    0 0
  • 05/07/14--08:06: Soviet Bear
  • About

    Soviet Bear is an advice animal image macro series featuring a character illustration of a brown bear and various propaganda slogans that either glorify Soviet Russia and communism or denounce the United States and capitalism in general. The character can be seen as an extension of the popular In Soviet Russia… trope.

    Origin

    On May 6th, 2014 Redditor UKZephyr submitted a photograph of a Soviet Russian-themed election campaign poster for a student council candidate at his school to the /r/funny[1]. Redditor UKZephyr’s post was quickly met with more than 74,800 up votes and gold rewards, reaching the front page of Reddit within hours.



    In the comments section of the post, Redditor Tacoman404 chimed in on the identity of the cartoon bear with a screenshot from DayZ in which the character is featured on a propaganda poster (shown below).



    Spread

    That same day, Reddtior JufishBong submitted an image macro featuring the original illustration of the bear and the caption reading “capitalist America steals your memes, vote Soviet bear” to /r/AdviceAnimals[2], where it garnered more than 15,000 upvotes in the first 12 hours.



    After Redditor JufishBong provided the blank template, dozens of additional image macro submissions followed suit on /r/AdviceAnimals[3], including a few counter-propaganda posters bearing the image of the American eagle featured in One Up America. However, the series has been also criticized by many members of /r/AdviceAnimals for employing less than original themes that are largely derived from “In Soviet Russia” jokes.

    Notable Examples




    External References


older | 1 | .... | 95 | 96 | (Page 97) | 98 | 99 | .... | 202 | newer